Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohannesburg
IN THE NEWS

Johannesburg

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 2, 2013
Here's a great fare from LAX to Johannesburg, South Africa, on United or Lufthansa: $1,057 round trip, including all taxes and fees. It is subject to availability. You must stay over a Saturday night but may not stay longer than three months. Departures must be between Nov. 1 and Nov. 30 or Jan. 10 and March 10. Info: United , (800) 864-8331; Lufthansa , (800) 645-3880 Source: Airfarewatchdog Follow us on Twitter @latimestravel , like us on Facebook @Los Angeles Times Travel.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 20, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
South African runner Oscar Pistorius was indicted Wednesday on two new charges that are believed to allege he fired guns in public during separate incidents that occurred before he killed his girlfriend in his apartment in February. Already indicted on a main charge of murder in the shooting death of Reeva Steenkamp as well as a charge of illegal possession of ammunition, the double-amputee hero of the 2012 London Olympics will likely have to defend himself against all four charges at his trial scheduled for March.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
November 30, 2003
Regarding "New Shine on City of Gold" (Nov. 16): Former resident Ted Botha's rosy picture of Johannesburg as a tourist destination was rather typical of many of my South African friends, who grossly understate the epidemic of crime that plagues the city and the country. This is not an issue to be marginalized. Before 2001, Johannesburg had a murder rate 16 times that of London, and one in 110 people was a victim of aggravated robbery with a firearm each year -- exponentially higher than any other place Americans are likely to travel.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Erin Conway-Smith
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Nelson Mandela was discharged from the hospital Sunday but will continue receiving care at home under the close supervision of doctors, and with his family nearby. The former South African president, who is 95, was taken by ambulance from a Pretoria hospital, where he spent the last three months, to his home in the upscale Houghton suburb of Johannesburg. He remains in critical condition “and is at times unstable,” requiring “medical interventions,” according to South African President Jacob Zuma's office, the only official source of updates on Mandela's health.
WORLD
November 26, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The spring, just over 20 miles northwest of Johannesburg, flows blood red. It is toxic, highly acidic and full of heavy metals, so nasty that newly weaned impala and other animals in the Krugersdorp Game Reserve downstream can't drink the water ? and some of them die of thirst. The water, a poisonous legacy of the gold mining industry, is dead. Not one living organism survives in it. Millions of gallons of the same kind of toxic water lie underneath Johannesburg, a city of nearly 4 million people, and it's rising 50 feet a month.
WORLD
September 13, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Each morning, an old Toyota arrives at the park, its engine protesting but its light blue paint work spotless. A sprightly woman with neatly coiffed snow-white hair alights. She and her arthritic dog, part border collie, part mutt, walk once around the park. Passing, she nods and smiles. A man, wearing only his briefs, sits in the sun on a rock in the middle of the park's river, his clothes laid out to dry. On the riverbank, faded yellow signs with skulls and crossbones warn against drinking, swimming or washing there.
NEWS
March 19, 1991
A delegation of the International Olympic Committee arrives Friday in Johannesburg on a fact-finding mission that many South Africans are predicting will lead to the country's speedy return to world sporting competition, perhaps in time for the 1992 games in Barcelona, Spain. South African sporting administrators previously won praise from longtime opponent and head of Africa's National Olympic Committee, Jean Claude Ganga, for establishing multiracial bodies to control sports in the country.
NEWS
April 24, 1990
Five exiled leaders of the African National Congress return to South Africa under a temporary amnesty this week to prepare for next month's historic talks with President Frederik W. de Klerk's government. The returnees, including the chief of the once-outlawed group's 30-year guerrilla war against the white leadership, will meet with deputy president Nelson Mandela and other internal ANC leaders.
NEWS
November 26, 1991
The government, the African National Congress and at least 20 other political groups in South Africa meet Friday to make arrangements for the beginning of historic constitutional negotiations next month. The session, the first of its kind in South African history, will discuss, among other things, the size of the negotiating table, its location and who will sit as moderator over the contentious political leaders.
WORLD
October 16, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Preparing to move to Africa two years ago, the 26-year-old Londoner looked at her beloved pair of 6-inch gold platform shoes, sensing she might not get the chance to wear them again. "But I packed them anyway," Sharna Darko recalled. Sister-in-law Louise Darko, meanwhile, took her entire 30-pair shoe collection. A generation earlier, Sharna's parents had left their home in Jamaica and Louise's parents had departed their Ghana homestead to go to a land of opportunity: Britain.
WORLD
June 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - President Obama's first audience of South Africans assembled Saturday in Soweto, and he recalled the protests that tore through the neighborhoods here in 1976, galvanizing the anti-apartheid movement. The 51-year-old president was among the few in the room old enough to remember. The town hall, packed with young people at the University of Johannesburg, was the latest in a series of international youth outreach efforts staged by the president. Obama's foreign travel schedule these days can sometimes look like a globe-trotting college tour.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
Here's a great fare from LAX to Johannesburg, South Africa, on United or Lufthansa: $1,057 round trip, including all taxes and fees. It is subject to availability. You must stay over a Saturday night but may not stay longer than three months. Departures must be between Nov. 1 and Nov. 30 or Jan. 10 and March 10. Info: United , (800) 864-8331; Lufthansa , (800) 645-3880 Source: Airfarewatchdog Follow us on Twitter @latimestravel , like us on Facebook @Los Angeles Times Travel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Spoek Mathambo grew up in the Johannesburg township of Soweto, where his adolescence was defined by the end of apartheid. Now 27, this South African singer-rapper-producer has emerged as one of the year's most exciting new artists, with a bold sound bent on stylistic desegregation and an unlikely relationship with an American indie-rock label. Mathambo funnels a dizzying number of influences - both musical and cultural - into “Father Creeper,” due out Tuesday on Seattle's Sub Pop. His music is an electro-acoustic melee of swaggering rap verses, scratchy rock guitar, singsong vocal hooks and staticky white noise.
WORLD
October 16, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Preparing to move to Africa two years ago, the 26-year-old Londoner looked at her beloved pair of 6-inch gold platform shoes, sensing she might not get the chance to wear them again. "But I packed them anyway," Sharna Darko recalled. Sister-in-law Louise Darko, meanwhile, took her entire 30-pair shoe collection. A generation earlier, Sharna's parents had left their home in Jamaica and Louise's parents had departed their Ghana homestead to go to a land of opportunity: Britain.
WORLD
July 20, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Derek Mutigo's home is pitch black and as cold as a fridge. To reach it, he descends broken steps into a cavernous basement and edges along a corridor holding a small plastic flashlight, its pale beam revealing haphazard plasterboard walls that don't reach the ceiling. Numbers are scrawled in black ink on rickety doors. Nothing's painted; everything looks as though it was filched from a building site. "Warning, strictly no alcohol, smoking and fighting," says a scribbled sign on a wall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2011 | Richard Cromelin
Gil Scott-Heron, a singer, songwriter, poet and author whose social commentary and combination of spoken words with musical grooves are widely cited as a seminal influence on rap music, died Friday. He was 62. The Associated Press reported that a friend, Doris C. Nolan, who answered the telephone number listed for Scott-Heron's Manhattan recording company, said he died at St. Luke's Hospital in New York after becoming sick upon returning from a trip to Europe. Scott-Heron, who recorded and performed prolifically from the early 1970s until the mid-'80s before being derailed by drug addiction, was a vital link between the percussive polemics of New York's the Last Poets of the 1960s and such politically charged hip-hop forces as Public Enemy and Talib Kweli.
NEWS
January 13, 1986 | United Press International
The Supreme Court today turned down black activist Winnie Mandela's bid to overturn a government order barring her from Johannesburg and the neighboring Soweto black township. In Cape Town, meanwhile, U.S. envoy Chester Crocker met with President Pieter W. Botha to discuss Namibian independence and deliver a personal letter from President Reagan. Mandela, known in black dissident circles as "the Mother of the Nation," was barred by a government order issued Dec.
WORLD
April 15, 2004 | Scott Kraft, Times Staff Writer
When apartheid ended a decade ago, this was a tidy, all-white suburb of 20,000 squeezed between the sprawling black township of Soweto and the economic engine of white rule, Johannesburg. But the residents who converged on a local school to vote in elections Wednesday reflected, like so much of South Africa, a nation transformed. Now a teeming suburb of 50,000, Rosettenville is a racial melange.
WORLD
November 26, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The spring, just over 20 miles northwest of Johannesburg, flows blood red. It is toxic, highly acidic and full of heavy metals, so nasty that newly weaned impala and other animals in the Krugersdorp Game Reserve downstream can't drink the water ? and some of them die of thirst. The water, a poisonous legacy of the gold mining industry, is dead. Not one living organism survives in it. Millions of gallons of the same kind of toxic water lie underneath Johannesburg, a city of nearly 4 million people, and it's rising 50 feet a month.
WORLD
September 13, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Each morning, an old Toyota arrives at the park, its engine protesting but its light blue paint work spotless. A sprightly woman with neatly coiffed snow-white hair alights. She and her arthritic dog, part border collie, part mutt, walk once around the park. Passing, she nods and smiles. A man, wearing only his briefs, sits in the sun on a rock in the middle of the park's river, his clothes laid out to dry. On the riverbank, faded yellow signs with skulls and crossbones warn against drinking, swimming or washing there.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|