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NATIONAL
January 7, 2010 | By Bob Drogin
Like the disturbed genius in Hollywood's "A Beautiful Mind," Walter K. Sartory was a brilliant mathematician with a grave mental illness. It made him the perfect victim. Sartory worked for 30 years at Tennessee's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which was built in secret for the atomic bomb project and became America's largest science and energy lab. Sartory's work on nuclear weapons remains classified, but he published pioneering papers on reactor design, medical centrifuges and other subjects.
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SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Gary Klein
No. 9 USC (22-12) vs. No. 8 St. John's (22-10) Saturday at Thompson-Boling Arena, Knoxville, Tenn. How they got here: USC won four games in four days - including a victory over Stanford - to win the Pac-12 Conference tournament. St. John's reached the Big East tournament title game before losing to DePaul. Last 10 games: USC 7-3, St. John's 5-5. USC lineup: Starters - F Cassie Harberts (15.6 ppg, 7.4 rpg), G Ariya Crook (15.8 ppg, 2.3 apg), F Alexyz Vaioletama (15.8 ppg)
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NEWS
October 15, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three have been fired and 10 have quit. Nine have been promoted. Two have killed suspects while on duty. And one stands accused of falsifying evidence in a murder case. For most of the 44 Los Angeles Police Department officers labeled "problem officers" in the landmark 1991 Christopher Commission report, the past four years have been tumultuous. The commission said its intention was to illustrate, not define, what it called "the problem of excessive force in the LAPD."
NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Just a week after Republicans raised hopes for a bipartisan overhaul of the nation's immigration laws, House Speaker John A. Boehner all but abandoned the effort Thursday, saying it would be "difficult" to get any legislation approved this year by his GOP majority. Boehner's sudden shift, coming after his high-profile unveiling last week of Republican immigration principles that were partly embraced by the White House, left immigration advocates fuming and renewed speculation that the speaker's tenuous grip on a rebellious rank-and-file was slipping again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The fashion news in fish bait this season is color. Living, wiggling color. When it comes to worms, brown is out. Day-Glo chartreuse, red and blue are in. Designer squirmers, created in Canada, made their debut in Ventura County last week. Anglers have tried them at Lake Piru and Lake Casitas, and although fish in Lake Piru don't seem impressed, some bait shops on the road to Lake Casitas are doing a brisk business.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2008 | Ralph Vartabedian and Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writers
John McCain was training in his AD-6 Skyraider on an overcast Texas morning in 1960 when he slammed into Corpus Christi Bay and sheared the skin off his plane's wings. McCain recounted the accident decades later in his autobiography. "The engine quit while I was practicing landings," he wrote. But an investigation board at the Naval Aviation Safety Center found no evidence of engine failure.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Superior Court jury in Los Angeles has awarded $2.5 million to a former executive of bankrupt Newport Beach home builder Baldwin Co. after finding that the owners reneged on a promise to make him a partner in the company. The jury found that brothers James and Alfred Baldwin breached their contract with Robert B. Burns, who headed their company's Los Angeles-Ventura division. However, the jury awarded damages only against James Baldwin, who directly supervised Burns' division.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Officer Henry J. Cousine--a police ring on his finger, an LAPD tattoo on his leg and battle scars on his body--says the officers accused of beating Rodney G. King swung their batons like "little girls." Then he ticks off some of his own episodes of violence during a decade as a beat cop: three fights and three shootings. "You get in my face, I'm going to fight back," Cousine said. "You swing at me, I'm going to knock you off your feet. And you pull a gun, I'll kill you."
SPORTS
December 13, 1985 | MARC APPLEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The Chargers exchanged bravado for humility when rookie John Hendy replaced Wayne Davis as the starting left cornerback. Davis' brashness was replaced by Hendy's modesty. "I'm not an outward type of person," Hendy said, "but I have confidence. I know what I can do and can't do. On the field, I play with a little cockiness, but I don't talk to opposing players. I think I'm a smart player and try to use that to my advantage."
BUSINESS
July 13, 1996 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the summer travel season heats up, Southwest Airlines fired the first salvo in a new fare war Friday by dropping many of its prices for travel in the West and Midwest to as low as $25 one way. United, American and Trans World Airlines quickly followed suit, and other competing airlines are expected to do so as well. But there's a big catch: Seats for the special fares will be limited. In United's case, reportedly as few as 10% of a typical flight's seats will get the special fare.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - In a potential breakthrough for long-stalled immigration legislation, House Republicans will consider a proposal this week that would allow millions of immigrants in the country illegally to gain legal status and, in some cases, to eventually become citizens. House Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio is expected to issue a list of broad immigration "principles" to fellow Republicans during a three-day retreat that begins Wednesday at a Chesapeake Bay resort. For the first time, the list will include a narrow path to citizenship as well as tighter border security and new visas for foreign workers.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California's two top legislative leaders - both Democrats - have their eyes on 2014 as California faces big challenges in continuing to improve the state's still underperforming economy. They're pleased that after years of austerity, the Assembly and Senate along with Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown have stabilized the state's budget, raising revenues, keeping spending in check and even socking away money for future downturns. Even so, state unemployment remained high at 8.5% in November, despite a quickening job creation pace.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | Christi Parsons
With his popularity flagging and his healthcare law at risk, President Obama has uncharacteristically reached outside his tightknit core of advisors to bring into the White House a veteran Democratic strategist who helped guide President Clinton through the darkest days of his presidency. The appointment of John Podesta, who was the White House chief of staff during the Monica Lewinsky scandal and the impeachment proceedings in Congress, is an acknowledgment by Obama of the extent of the problems that have dogged the first year of his second term.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
John Grisham is the world's most successful author of legal thrillers (and one baseball novel, last year's "Calico Joe") with sales of more than 275 million copies to his credit. He talked by phone from his office in Charlottesville, Va., about "Sycamore Row. " His latest novel returns to Clanton, Miss., the setting of his most popular book, "A Time to Kill," later made into a film and a play that recently closed after a brief run on Broadway. What made you decide to return to small-town lawyer Jake Brigance and Clanton almost 30 years after "A Time to Kill"?
NATIONAL
November 7, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - A bill to extend historic new protections to gays in the workplace won easy Senate approval Thursday, bolstered by rare bipartisan support that illustrated the dramatic shift in the politics around gay rights amid growing public acceptance for same-sex marriage. Seventeen years after a similar proposal failed by a single vote in the Senate, 10 Republicans joined a unanimous Democratic bloc to pass the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, known as ENDA, which would prohibit public and private employers, employment agencies and labor unions from using sexual orientation or gender identity as the basis for decisions about employment, promotion or compensation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO -- Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez (D-Los Angeles) announced Wednesday that he will run for the office of state controller next year. "California has made great strides in its path to recovery, but our work is far from complete," Pérez said in a statement. "I'm running for controller to ensure our government reflects the values of the people of California and increases prosperity, by managing our finances smartly, efficienty and effectively. " Pérez revealed his bid for to be the state's chief fiscal officer Wednesday afternoon during a Q & A session at Town Hall Los Angeles, a public discussion forum.
SPORTS
November 23, 1986 | BILL BRUBAKER, The Washington Post
These have been trying times for A. Lee Fentress, a globe-trotting 45-year-old lawyer who co-founded Advantage International Inc., a 3 1/2-year-old Washington-based sports management firm that represents more than 150 athletes from nine offices on four continents.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state agency filed suit to close three Orange County financial brokers for allegedly duping customers--many of them elderly--into investing $26 million in unregistered certificates of deposit. The Department of Corporations, in a filing last week in Superior Court in Los Angeles, alleged that the companies--CD Services Inc. and Nationwide CD Corp., both of Laguna Hills, and Leisure World Financial Services Inc.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - House Republicans united Wednesday around a plan to use the threat of a government shutdown as leverage to repeal President Obama's healthcare law, confident the American people are on their side. House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) yielded to his right flank by agreeing to attach the healthcare law repeal to a must-pass bill to keep the government funded past Sept. 30. A vote is expected Friday on a bill that would allow the government to stay open for the next few months.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - An Internal Revenue Service manager who described himself as a "conservative Republican" told congressional investigators that no one in the agency's Cincinnati office was trying to target tea party organizations for political reasons, according to an interview transcript released Tuesday. The manager, John Shafer, said he and an employee in his screening unit decided to pull applications for tax-exempt status filed by political groups and send them to managers in Washington.
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