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John A Boehner

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December 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Supreme Court refused to free Rep. Jim McDermott (D-Wash.) from having to pay damages to House Minority Leader John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) for letting reporters hear an illegally recorded 1996 phone call among House Republicans. Without comment, the justices let stand an appeals court ruling that the Constitution's free-speech guarantee doesn't shield McDermott from Boehner's lawsuit. A judge ordered McDermott to pay Boehner $60,000 in damages plus legal fees and costs.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro and Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - Just a week after Republicans raised hopes for a bipartisan overhaul of the nation's immigration laws, House Speaker John A. Boehner all but abandoned the effort Thursday, saying it would be "difficult" to get any legislation approved this year by his GOP majority. Boehner's sudden shift, coming after his high-profile unveiling last week of Republican immigration principles that were partly embraced by the White House, left immigration advocates fuming and renewed speculation that the speaker's tenuous grip on a rebellious rank-and-file was slipping again.
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NATIONAL
May 7, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
A key Republican House leader said Sunday that if President Bush's current strategy in Iraq is not working by fall, members of Congress will demand to know what the White House's next plan is. Rep. John A. Boehner of Ohio, the House minority leader, said the troop buildup had shown some success and noted that it was not yet complete. But he embraced the idea of setting benchmarks for the Iraqi government and requiring Bush to assess the Iraqis' progress on a monthly basis.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - In a potential breakthrough for long-stalled immigration legislation, House Republicans will consider a proposal this week that would allow millions of immigrants in the country illegally to gain legal status and, in some cases, to eventually become citizens. House Speaker John A. Boehner of Ohio is expected to issue a list of broad immigration "principles" to fellow Republicans during a three-day retreat that begins Wednesday at a Chesapeake Bay resort. For the first time, the list will include a narrow path to citizenship as well as tighter border security and new visas for foreign workers.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2006 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
New House Majority Leader John A. Boehner, who himself has been criticized for cozying up to Washington lobbyists, said Sunday that the public should know more about how lawmakers interacted with the lobbying industry, but he also stressed that politicians should not automatically stop taking trips paid for by special-interest groups. The Ohio Republican was making his first television appearances on the Sunday political talk shows since House Republicans chose him Thursday to succeed Rep.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2006 | Janet Hook and Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writers
Rep. John A. Boehner, with his ever-present cigarette, seems like a throwback to the days of Capitol Hill's smoke-filled rooms. He is hip-deep in political contributions from an industry he oversees. He was once scolded for passing out campaign checks from tobacco interests on the House floor. He was booted from a leadership post eight years ago.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
House Speaker John A. Boehner brought the Republican-led House into the gay marriage debate Friday by announcing plans to initiate a legal defense of the 1996 law that bars the federal government from giving legal rights or federal benefits to gay couples. Boehner, an Ohio Republican, seized on the opportunity to take up a social issue after the Obama administration announced last week that its Justice Department would no longer defend the law. The administration concluded that the law, known as the Defense of Marriage Act, was unconstitutional.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2006 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
One of three Republicans vying to replace Rep. Tom DeLay (R-Texas) as House majority leader offered rare public criticism Tuesday of House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.), saying he disagreed with key elements of Hastert's plan to overhaul the chamber's ethics rules. Rep. John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) questioned Hastert's call for a ban on travel by House members and their staffs paid for by private groups, indicating he considered such a proposal "childish."
NATIONAL
February 3, 2006 | Mary Curtius and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
In choosing Rep. John A. Boehner of Ohio as the new House majority leader Thursday, Republicans sought to put a new face on a party reeling from scandals and worried about maintaining its congressional majority. In an upset, Boehner won a tense closed-door vote that went to a second ballot. Rep. Roy Blunt of Missouri, the acting majority leader, had been favored to win the election.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli and Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama, acknowledging what appears to be a resounding Republican victory, made a midnight phone call to the man who is set to lead the opposition party as speaker of the House, John A. Boehner. The call was made from the president's Treaty Room office. According to the White House, Obama also called the current Democratic House leadership ? including Nancy Pelosi, whose four-year run as speaker will end in January ? and Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, whose party will remain in the minority in that chamber.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - A bill to extend historic new protections to gays in the workplace won easy Senate approval Thursday, bolstered by rare bipartisan support that illustrated the dramatic shift in the politics around gay rights amid growing public acceptance for same-sex marriage. Seventeen years after a similar proposal failed by a single vote in the Senate, 10 Republicans joined a unanimous Democratic bloc to pass the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, known as ENDA, which would prohibit public and private employers, employment agencies and labor unions from using sexual orientation or gender identity as the basis for decisions about employment, promotion or compensation.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - House Republicans united Wednesday around a plan to use the threat of a government shutdown as leverage to repeal President Obama's healthcare law, confident the American people are on their side. House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) yielded to his right flank by agreeing to attach the healthcare law repeal to a must-pass bill to keep the government funded past Sept. 30. A vote is expected Friday on a bill that would allow the government to stay open for the next few months.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama trimmed his demand for tax increases on the wealthy Monday, making a substantial counteroffer as he and House Speaker John A. Boehner reconvened privately at the White House. Crucial differences remain, but the quickened pace of the budget talks suggested the men are engaged in a serious effort to bridge the partisan divide before the holidays - and before the year-end "fiscal cliff" leads to economically dire tax increases and spending cuts. The president offered to raise tax rates on household income above $400,000, according to a source familiar with the talks who was not authorized to speak publicly about them.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
Hopes for a sweeping budget deal to increase the federal debt limit unraveled when House Speaker John A. Boehner abruptly withdrew from talks, provoking a furious response from President Obama, who summoned political leaders for an emergency meeting. "We have now run out of time," Obama said, demanding that the Democratic and Republican leaders of Congress convene for a White House meeting at 11 a.m. Saturday to explain what they will do to avoid default. Boehner, who has been under enormous pressure from the conservatives in the House Republican majority, blamed the breakdown on Obama's insistence that any deal include new revenues as well as spending cuts.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
In a presidency full of firsts, Barack Obama racked up another one: first sitting president to tweet from the White House. Obama strode to a laptop set up in the East Room on Wednesday, splayed his fingers in classic touch-type position and tweeted out a question: "In order to reduce the deficit, what costs would you cut and what investments would you keep? BO. " With that, the first Twitter town hall was underway. Obama sat on a high stool, his back to the Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington, and fielded questions submitted via the trendiest of social media tools.
NATIONAL
July 6, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
Congressional leaders will converge on the White House for Thursday's summit on deficit reduction, but the burden for advancing the talks and averting a fiscal crisis increasingly has fallen on two key negotiators: President Obama and House Speaker John A. Boehner. As a deadline nears, top aides for Obama and Boehner have privately been exchanging views about budget proposals, a sign of efforts underway to work through key issues that have separated the two sides for more than two months.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - A bill to extend historic new protections to gays in the workplace won easy Senate approval Thursday, bolstered by rare bipartisan support that illustrated the dramatic shift in the politics around gay rights amid growing public acceptance for same-sex marriage. Seventeen years after a similar proposal failed by a single vote in the Senate, 10 Republicans joined a unanimous Democratic bloc to pass the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, known as ENDA, which would prohibit public and private employers, employment agencies and labor unions from using sexual orientation or gender identity as the basis for decisions about employment, promotion or compensation.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
In a presidency full of firsts, Barack Obama racked up another one: first sitting president to tweet from the White House. Obama strode to a laptop set up in the East Room on Wednesday, splayed his fingers in classic touch-type position and tweeted out a question: "In order to reduce the deficit, what costs would you cut and what investments would you keep? BO. " With that, the first Twitter town hall was underway. Obama sat on a high stool, his back to the Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington, and fielded questions submitted via the trendiest of social media tools.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
President Obama was safely back in Washington after his slightly shortened trip to Latin America, preparing on Thursday to deal with questions about his policy on Libya, which is under attack from several, sometimes contradictory angles. It was Sarah Palin, freshly back from his her own globe-trotting, who captured the mood of one stream of the Republican opposition to Obama’s military intervention in Libya. “I would like to see, of course, as long as we're in it -- we better be in it to win it,” Palin, a Fox News contributor, told Fox host Greta Van Susteren.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
House Speaker John A. Boehner brought the Republican-led House into the gay marriage debate Friday by announcing plans to initiate a legal defense of the 1996 law that bars the federal government from giving legal rights or federal benefits to gay couples. Boehner, an Ohio Republican, seized on the opportunity to take up a social issue after the Obama administration announced last week that its Justice Department would no longer defend the law. The administration concluded that the law, known as the Defense of Marriage Act, was unconstitutional.
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