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John A Gavin

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NEWS
August 2, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Gavin, a former actor and outspoken ambassador to Mexico during the Ronald Reagan Administration, is being urged by some prominent California Republicans to enter the party's primary next year as a candidate to succeed retiring Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston. "He's talked to people in the (Bush) Administration and in Congress," Judy Miller, Gavin's aide, said Thursday. "He has not encouraged or invited any of this. He is obviously listening to them."
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NEWS
August 2, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Gavin, a former actor and outspoken ambassador to Mexico during the Ronald Reagan Administration, is being urged by some prominent California Republicans to enter the party's primary next year as a candidate to succeed retiring Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston. "He's talked to people in the (Bush) Administration and in Congress," Judy Miller, Gavin's aide, said Thursday. "He has not encouraged or invited any of this. He is obviously listening to them."
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BUSINESS
January 25, 1989
John A. Gavin, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, has been elected a director of Arco, Los Angeles. Gavin, 57, is president of Univisa Satellite Communications, a division of Univisa, a Los Angeles-based company that supplies news and entertainment programs to Spanish-language television stations. Before joining Univisa in May, 1987, Gavin served for a year as vice president-federal and international relations at Arco.
NEWS
April 27, 1987 | From United Press International
John A. Gavin, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, resigned today as a vice president of Arco after less than 10 months on the job to become president of Univisa Satellite Communications. The Los Angeles-based communications company owns Univision, a Spanish-language television news and entertainment programmer. Gavin, 55, joined Arco last June as vice president of federal and international relations after serving five stormy years as U.S. ambassador to Mexico.
NEWS
January 10, 1985 | United Press International
U.S. Ambassador to Mexico John A. Gavin is expected to resign his post soon as part of a general shake-up of the U.S. diplomatic corps in Latin America, it was reported today. Gavin, appointed by President Reagan in 1981, is reported to be tired of the post and will submit his resignation in February or March, the Dallas Times Herald quoted diplomatic sources as saying.
NEWS
May 2, 1985 | JUAN M. VASQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
The United States is seeking the removal of Mexico's ambassador to the United Nations, Porfirio Munoz Ledo, diplomatic sources said Wednesday. U.S. and Mexican officials are concerned that the matter could become another source of friction in the already troubled relations between the two governments. Behind the move, the sources said, is Munoz Ledo's involvement in a gun-wielding incident in New York a few weeks ago. They described it as "a fairly serious breach of diplomatic protocol."
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A desperate, last-minute attempt to break a weeklong impasse that had blocked nearly 30 diplomatic appointments failed Thursday on the Senate floor, as Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) announced the nominations would be held over until after Congress' Fourth of July recess.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1989 | United Press International
New York Post Publisher Peter Price announced Monday that he was resigning in order to form a partnership with the Los Angeles-based unit of an international communications company. Price will team up with Univisa, the U.S. subsidiary of Televisa, which has been described as the world's largest producer of Spanish-language television and radio programming. Univisa's principals include John A. Gavin, former U.S. ambassador to Mexico.
NEWS
June 27, 1986 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico John A. Gavin said that two governors of Mexican states are "up to their elbows" in drug trafficking and corruption, but he declined to identify them to a Senate subcommittee Thursday. Gavin said Gov. Rodolfo Felix Valdez of Sonora, who had been accused by U.S. Customs Commissioner William von Raab of owning four ranches on which opium poppies and marijuana are being grown under police and military protection, was not one of the two.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The government of Mexico, long used to looking at illicit narcotics as a big problem for the United States and a minor bother for itself, has decided that the trade is getting out of control in Sinaloa, a Pacific Coast farming state. In a region where country musicians sing the praises of drug lords, the government is changing its tune. Drug smugglers had the run of Sinaloa in recent years. By all accounts, the trade went hand in hand with payoffs to corrupt officials.
OPINION
September 26, 1999 | Sergio Munoz, Sergio Munoz is an editorial writer for The Times
Being U.S. ambassador to Mexico has never been easy. The size and complexity of the bilateral agenda can be truly overwhelming: Intricate trade and immigration regulations, as well as drug-trafficking standoffs, are some of the difficult issues involved. The cultural, political and economic differences between countries can appear impossible to manage. On the Mexican side, history also plays a role in how the U.S. ambassador is perceived.
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