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John A Mccone

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February 16, 1991 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John A. McCone, who helped form the Central Intelligence Agency and served as its director during the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, has died at his home in Pebble Beach. He was 89. McCone died Thursday night of cardiac arrest. CIA Director William H. Webster said Friday that McCone "made an enormous contribution to the security of this nation . . . (and) guided the intelligence community during a particularly trying time."
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NEWS
February 16, 1991 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John A. McCone, who helped form the Central Intelligence Agency and served as its director during the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, has died at his home in Pebble Beach. He was 89. McCone died Thursday night of cardiac arrest. CIA Director William H. Webster said Friday that McCone "made an enormous contribution to the security of this nation . . . (and) guided the intelligence community during a particularly trying time."
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NEWS
April 19, 1992
Caltech has received a gift of $2.5 million from the estate of the late John A. McCone and the McCone Foundation. The funds will endow the John A. McCone Professorship of High Energy Physics with $1.5 million. Mark B. Wise, professor of theoretical physics, will be the new McCone Professor. Of the balance, $100,000 will be used to purchase library materials related to high-energy physics.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
The following sources were used in putting together this special section. California Assn. of Realtors California Dept. of Finance California Employment Development Dept. Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. of Los Angeles County Los Angeles Police Department Los Angeles City Planning Dept. Los Angeles Times History Center Southern Calif. Assn. of Governments Characteristics of the South and East Los Angeles Areas, U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1965.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hayward R. Alker, 69, an international relations scholar who held the John A. McCone Chair in International Relations at USC, died Aug. 24 at a hospital in Providence, R.I., after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage at his summer home on Block Island, the university announced. Alker, whose Quaker faith informed his nonviolent worldview, studied world order and international conflict resolution.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan will award posthumous Medals of Freedom to actor Danny Kaye and composer Meredith Willson, the White House announced Tuesday. Others chosen for the nation's highest civilian honor are conductor Mstislav Rostropovich, Frederick Patterson, founder of the United Negro College Fund, and Nathan Perlmutter, executive director of the Anti-Defamation League. The awards will be presented June 23 at the White House, the announcement said.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Tuesday saluted the work of 10 Americans, awarding them the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the government's highest civilian award, in luncheon ceremonies at the White House. Reagan honored the recipients as "fellow Americans who've made a difference--Americans who represent the very best of our country." The honors--a medal and a citation signed by Reagan--are awarded only by the President to those who have made "especially meritorious contributions" to U.S.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marlen Eldredge Neumann, the only woman to serve on the eight-member McCone Commission that investigated the Watts riots of 1965, has died in Washington, D.C., at age 81. Neumann also served as president of the Los Angeles League of Women Voters and was a member of the city's Civil Service Commission. She died Tuesday of heart failure, family members said. She was married to Robert G. Neumann, a UCLA political science professor who became U.S.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government's intelligence analysts were so sure in the summer of 1962 that the Soviet Union would not risk sending offensive nuclear weapons to Cuba they discounted growing evidence to the contrary, changing their views only after a lucky U-2 reconnaissance flight produced clear photographic proof, declassified CIA documents showed Monday.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | BEA MAXWELL
Olive Crest Treatment Centers for Abused Children received more than $100,000 raised by the black-and-white ball on March 6 at the Four Seasons Hotel, Newport Beach. The fund-raiser, attended by 500 guests, was sponsored by Olive Crest Abused Children's Foundation and chaired by Betty Belden-Palmer and Roberta Rinehart. Olive Crest provides group homes and foster homes for abused, abandoned and troubled children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Ziskind, a veteran Los Angeles labor lawyer who helped desegregate the city's Fire Department and was active on local community relations panels following the 1965 Watts riots, has died. He was 98. Ziskind died July 2 in Los Angeles, said his daughter, Ellen Z. Berg of Washington, D.C. In the mid-1950s, Ziskind stepped into a feud between then-Los Angeles Mayor Norris Poulson and Fire Chief John H. Alderson over the city Fire Commission's order to hire and promote African Americans.
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