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John A Sculley

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June 4, 1987
The breach of contract suit, filed by Steven Kitchen and Woodside Design Associates in Redwood City, Calif., accuses Apple of reneging on a 1985 oral deal to acquire Woodside, developer of a flat-panel video screen for computers. The suit claims that Woodside's agreement with founder and then-Chairman Steven P. Jobs was broken once Jobs was ousted from power in a bitter dispute with John A. Sculley, president and now chairman.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 1997 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May 1993, John Sculley was chairman of Apple Computer, a friend of Bill (as in Clinton) and some people's technology visionary du jour. Just eight months later, he was an out-of-work executive who'd embarrassed himself by going to work for a tainted Long Island company and was now being held responsible for the ruination of Apple. It was a remarkably precipitous fall. But now Sculley is trying once again to be a player in a technology industry that's always regarded him with suspicion.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
To: John A. Sculley Chief Executive, Apple Computer Subject: Revitalizing Apple These are excruciating times for Apple and for you. Your market share in personal computers continues to decay, you've churned top management and on Wednesday announced a 3% work force cut. Your leadership has been criticized as destructively aloof or low-key incompetent.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1994 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Sculley and Spectrum Information Technologies have agreed to drop the lawsuits they filed against one another after Sculley quit the company last month--thus halting, at least temporarily, one of the most colorful public spats in the business world.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1997 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May 1993, John Sculley was chairman of Apple Computer, a friend of Bill (as in Clinton) and some people's technology visionary du jour. Just eight months later, he was an out-of-work executive who'd embarrassed himself by going to work for a tainted Long Island company and was now being held responsible for the ruination of Apple. It was a remarkably precipitous fall. But now Sculley is trying once again to be a player in a technology industry that's always regarded him with suspicion.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Apple Says CEO John Sculley Isn't Jumping Ship: Reviving periodic rumors that Sculley is looking for work elsewhere, USA Today reported that he has privately discussed other opportunities, including starting a technology company on the East Coast.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
The year is 2000, and Prof. Bradford in Berkeley is desperately trying to pull together a last-minute lecture on deforestation of the Amazon for his 4:15 class. He flips on his notebook-sized computer and starts talking, ordering libraries of research papers, a few animated charts and even some help directly from a colleague across the country. The computer, a revolutionary device by any standard, doesn't exist today except in a slick, six-minute video produced by Apple Computer Inc.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apple Computer Chairman John Sculley's visit to Japan has renewed speculation about a possible alliance between Apple and Sony Corp. or another Japanese consumer electronics company. Sculley reiterated Wednesday his desire to expand Apple's computer know-how to a broader array of consumer products, such as advanced TVs and compact disk players, possibly through a tie-up with a Japanese consumer electronics company.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Apple Computer is in crisis again. In a hectic week, its highly visible chairman John Sculley stepped aside as chief executive and Apple directors met in an extraordinary board meeting to name Michael Spindler, Apple's president, as the CEO. Their action resolves a simmering dispute between Spindler and Sculley about Apple's immediate direction. It could be a case of this young company once again getting the right person for the job.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1994 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a blistering counterattack against John Sculley, Spectrum Information Technologies said it filed a $300-million lawsuit Wednesday against its former chairman, charging that Sculley's resignation two days earlier was the culmination of an elaborate conspiracy. A spokesman for Sculley called the Spectrum lawsuit "a complete work of fiction."
NEWS
February 8, 1994 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may have been one of the worst career moves of all time. In October, John Sculley--having worn out his welcome at Apple Computer--joined a small, unproven, communications company called Spectrum Information Technologies. On Monday, he resigned--and filed a lawsuit against the executive he says recruited him to the job under false pretenses. It's a bizarre, tragicomic saga that may permanently blacken the reputation of one of the nation's most prominent business executives.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
John Sculley, the former boss at Apple Computer Inc. who is now chairman of tiny Spectrum Information Technologies, on Tuesday denied a report that he is leaving the wireless communications company. But the television report, by columnist Dan Dorfman, also alleged that the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating the company, and it sparked frenzied trading in Spectrum shares, which tumbled $1 to $6.31 on the Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Apple Pays Severance to Sculley's Former Aides: The computer maker, which gave former Chairman John Sculley a multimillion-dollar severance package, disclosed that two of his top assistants got somewhat smaller packages. Albert A. Eisenstat, who was vice president and secretary, will receive $646,000, medical benefits and the right to exercise options to buy Apple Computer Inc. shares valued at $13.4 million. Robert L.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Apple Gives Sculley Hefty Package: Apple Computer Inc. sweetened former Chairman John Sculley's goodby with a multimillion-dollar golden parachute that included the purchase of his Lear jet, the company's proxy statement shows. Just a few weeks after Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple fired 2,500 employees and ordered a 5% pay cut for its executive staff, the computer company paid Sculley $1 million in severance and promised another $750,000 in "consultant's fees" over the next year.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1993 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Sculley, who resigned Friday as chairman of Apple Computer Inc., raised more than a few eyebrows Monday with the announcement that he will head Spectrum Information Technologies Inc., a small and controversial wireless communications company. Sculley is believed to have been a candidate for the top job at Eastman Kodak Co., and many observers had assumed he would land at a major company.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1988 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
After years of dedicated, hard work--not to mention leading a company to record-setting sales and profits--an employee deserves a little time off, right? Of course. So John Sculley, chairman and chief executive of Apple Computer, is planning to take a nine-week, fully paid leave from the helm of the high-flying personal computer maker beginning June 29.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean-Louis Gassee, head of Apple Computer's new-product development unit, is expected to resign shortly because he feels wrongly blamed for the company's current ills, sources close to the company confirmed Wednesday. The resignation of Gassee, a flamboyant 46-year-old French engineer who had overseen new products for the last five years, would create the third vacancy in the top six jobs at Apple.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Sculley, the one-time Pepsi marketer turned technology visionary, resigned Friday as chairman of Apple Computer Inc., ending a 10-year tenure with the company that he helped turn into a powerhouse seller of easy-to-use computers.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Apple Computer is in crisis again. In a hectic week, its highly visible chairman John Sculley stepped aside as chief executive and Apple directors met in an extraordinary board meeting to name Michael Spindler, Apple's president, as the CEO. Their action resolves a simmering dispute between Spindler and Sculley about Apple's immediate direction. It could be a case of this young company once again getting the right person for the job.
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