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John A Svahn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1988 | TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writer
When Los Angeles County set out to comply with new state and federal requirements to move people off welfare, it alarmed the social services bureaucracy in Sacramento by taking a most unusual step. In a move unique among local governments, county officials turned over supervision of its massive workfare program to a private company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1988 | TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writer
When Los Angeles County set out to comply with new state and federal requirements to move people off welfare, it alarmed the social services bureaucracy in Sacramento by taking a most unusual step. In a move unique among local governments, county officials turned over supervision of its massive workfare program to a private company.
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NEWS
June 21, 1986 | Associated Press
Dorcas R. Hardy of California has been confirmed by the Senate to be commissioner of the Social Security system. She was approved by voice vote Thursday night to succeed John A. Svahn.
NEWS
March 20, 1986
President Reagan said he intends to nominate Dorcas R. Hardy, assistant health and human services secretary, to be commissioner of Social Security. If confirmed by the Senate, Hardy, 39, a former health services official at USC, would succeed John A. Svahn as head of the pension system. Hardy was California's assistant secretary for health under then-Gov. Reagan in 1973-74.
NEWS
October 6, 1985 | United Press International
Margaret M. Heckler complained that she was ousted as secretary of health and human services because of a "long-term vendetta" on the part of "one individual in the White House." Heckler, who this week resigned from the department to become U.S. ambassador to Ireland, said in an interview published Saturday that the vendetta "went on for years" but that, with the support of President Reagan, she nonetheless was able to accomplish a great deal.
NEWS
September 30, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan said today that he wants to talk to Health and Human Services Secretary Margaret M. Heckler about "something else" he might like her to do but denied that he is going to fire the head of the government's largest department. Heckler, who has launched a campaign to save her Cabinet job, sought and was granted a meeting with Reagan later in the day. Reports have circulated for days that Reagan is about to name her ambassador to Ireland.
NEWS
February 5, 1985 | Associated Press
The Nixon era speech writer who wrote Vice President Spiro T. Agnew's blistering attacks on the press will move into the Reagan White House as director of communications, it was announced today. Patrick J. Buchanan, now a television commentator and newspaper columnist, will be in overall control of White House communications, including press relations and speech writing, new White House Chief of Staff Donald T. Regan said.
NEWS
July 19, 1985 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan is expected to replace Budget Director David A. Stockman, who announced his resignation last week, with Federal Trade Commission Chairman James C. Miller III, Administration sources said Thursday. Miller, an economist, would succeed Stockman at a time when the federal government is threatened by annual deficits of more than $200 billion, deficits that are proving more intractable than ever.
NEWS
February 6, 1985 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Blending ideological fervor with political pragmatism, President Reagan filled out his new team of senior advisers Tuesday by appointing conservative columnist Patrick J. Buchanan as his communications strategist and rehiring two former key aides, political expert Edward J. Rollins and congressional lobbyist Max L. Friedersdorf. The appointments were announced by Donald T. Regan, the new White House chief of staff, who had selected and recruited the three.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
The White House senior staff, led by President Reagan and Vice President George Bush, will undergo voluntary testing for drugs beginning Monday "to set the example and lead the way to the President's goal of a drug-free workplace," the White House announced Thursday. Although none of the 78 top staff members are required to take the test, White House spokesman Rusty Brashear said that those who refuse to participate "would be noted" and that they could bear the brunt of "peer group pressure."
NEWS
February 8, 1986 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
Congressional leaders, citing strong political pressure from voters, vowed Friday to meet the Gramm-Rudman law's drastic deficit-reduction targets, even though a three-judge federal panel Friday overturned key provisions of the act and it still faces scrutiny by the Supreme Court. "I would guess that there is still plenty of pressure to go around," said Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.). Rep. Mike Synar (D-Okla.
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