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John A Young

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BUSINESS
October 25, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The Securities and Exchange Commission approved sweeping investor reforms earlier this month, making it easier for shareholders to communicate with one another and forcing companies to more clearly disclose executive compensation. The reforms, which were three years in the making, were particularly sought after by institutional investors, who complained that they were barred from discussing issues of mutual importance.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hewlett-Packard CEO Denies He Is IBM Candidate: John Young, the former president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co., denied that he is a candidate for the top post at International Business Machines Corp. Young, 60, issued a brief statement through a Hewlett-Packard spokeswoman saying he is "definitely not a candidate for the IBM job." Young is the third business executive this week to say he won't be succeeding John F. Akers as IBM's chief executive.
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BUSINESS
June 24, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Technically competent but a tad stodgy, reliably profitable but overstaffed and lagging in financial performance. That's the reputation that has dogged Hewlett-Packard Co. the past several years. As recently as last fall, the venerable Silicon Valley firm seemed to be stumbling along its conservative path. Wall Street was in a snit over years of lackluster earnings, and company co-founder David Packard had re-emerged in an operating role amid speculation that Chief Executive John A.
NEWS
December 2, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON
IRAQGATE, THE SEQUEL: Democrats got a lot of campaign mileage out of charges that President Bush helped arm Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein before the Persian Gulf War. Now, some conservative Republicans on Capitol Hill are gearing up to turn the Iraqgate scandal against a Silicon Valley mogul, if President-elect Bill Clinton picks him for secretary of commerce: John Young, president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co. in Palo Alto. . . .
BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Hewlett-Packard CEO Denies He Is IBM Candidate: John Young, the former president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co., denied that he is a candidate for the top post at International Business Machines Corp. Young, 60, issued a brief statement through a Hewlett-Packard spokeswoman saying he is "definitely not a candidate for the IBM job." Young is the third business executive this week to say he won't be succeeding John F. Akers as IBM's chief executive.
NEWS
December 2, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON
IRAQGATE, THE SEQUEL: Democrats got a lot of campaign mileage out of charges that President Bush helped arm Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein before the Persian Gulf War. Now, some conservative Republicans on Capitol Hill are gearing up to turn the Iraqgate scandal against a Silicon Valley mogul, if President-elect Bill Clinton picks him for secretary of commerce: John Young, president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard Co. in Palo Alto. . . .
BUSINESS
May 8, 1985
Chevron, San Francisco, elected as directors R. Hal Dean, former chairman of Ralston Purina; James E. Lee, chairman and chief executive of Gulf Corp., which Chevron acquired, and John A. Young, president and chief executive of Hewlett-Packard.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1985
John A. Young, chief executive of the Palo Alto-based firm, told securities analysts that its domestic orders were up 5% while international orders were up 10% in the first two months of fiscal 1985. Young said the sluggishness began in the last quarter of fiscal 1984. The company's stock topped the New York Stock Exchange's most-active list, falling $1.25 to $33.875.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1986 | GREG JOHNSON
Hewlett-Packard reported first-quarter net earnings of $109 million, a 6% decrease from the corresponding period of 1985. The company said revenue totaled nearly $1.6 billion for the quarter, compared to $1.53 billion in the same period last year, while international revenue was up 5% to $681 million for the latest period. H-P President John A. Young said: "We've made good progress in reducing the cost of goods sold as a percent of revenue.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1992 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The Securities and Exchange Commission approved sweeping investor reforms earlier this month, making it easier for shareholders to communicate with one another and forcing companies to more clearly disclose executive compensation. The reforms, which were three years in the making, were particularly sought after by institutional investors, who complained that they were barred from discussing issues of mutual importance.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Technically competent but a tad stodgy, reliably profitable but overstaffed and lagging in financial performance. That's the reputation that has dogged Hewlett-Packard Co. the past several years. As recently as last fall, the venerable Silicon Valley firm seemed to be stumbling along its conservative path. Wall Street was in a snit over years of lackluster earnings, and company co-founder David Packard had re-emerged in an operating role amid speculation that Chief Executive John A.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1987
Citing solid growth in both domestic and foreign sales, Hewlett-Packard announced a 28% jump in second-quarter earnings and an increase of 18% for the first half of 1987. The company, which manufactures computer products and systems, said it had second-quarter revenue of $2.02 billion, up 13%. Revenue from U.S. sales increased by 8% to $997 million and foreign sales increased by 19% to $1.02 billion, the company said.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
When Michael D. Eisner and Frank G. Wells took over as top executives at troubled Walt Disney Co. in 1984, they took smaller base salaries in exchange for a shot at lucrative bonuses and stock options. If they turned the firm around, the bonuses and stock options would kick in and earn them far more than what they gave up in base salaries. Such confidence has paid off handsomely for the Disney duo. The $40.1 million and $32.1 million that Eisner and Wells earned in 1988--mostly in bonuses and stock options--made them by far the highest-paid managers last year in The Times' annual survey of executive compensation at California-based, publicly held companies.
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