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John Abercrombie

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
Although technology has played a considerable role in reshaping jazz during the past decade or so, no number of synthesizers and gadgets can be blamed for what many find to be a general decline in musical quality. A case in point is John Abercrombie, the New York-based guitarist who worked the weekend at the Palace Court with bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Peter Erskine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
The John Abercrombie heard at Catalina Tuesday was not exactly the musician many listeners expected to hear. Over the years, this distinctive stylist has experimented with everything from guitar synthesizers to an electric mandolin. Now, however, he says he's given up synthesizers, reducing his artillery to an electric guitar--powerfully amplified--and an acoustic model. In no way does the result represent a retrogression.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
The John Abercrombie heard at Catalina Tuesday was not exactly the musician many listeners expected to hear. Over the years, this distinctive stylist has experimented with everything from guitar synthesizers to an electric mandolin. Now, however, he says he's given up synthesizers, reducing his artillery to an electric guitar--powerfully amplified--and an acoustic model. In no way does the result represent a retrogression.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
John Abercrombie, one of the most adventurous artists in a new generation of guitarists, is always reaching for higher-tech. The group he now leads (due to open tonight for a 6-day run at Catalina Bar & Grill) finds him working with the guitar synthesizer, enabling the group to undergo a powerful change of character: In effect, the trio can become a full orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
John Abercrombie, one of the most adventurous artists in a new generation of guitarists, is always reaching for higher-tech. The group he now leads (due to open tonight for a 6-day run at Catalina Bar & Grill) finds him working with the guitar synthesizer, enabling the group to undergo a powerful change of character: In effect, the trio can become a full orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Only a resentful rival could confuse McCoy Tyner's vigorous, lusty approach to the keyboard with a destructive intent. "There is a false rumor," Tyner said, "that I destroy pianos. I don't do that. The only ones I destroy are the bad ones." After emerging from a lengthy stint with John Coltrane (1960-65), Tyner became, during the 1970s, the most influential pianist of his generation. For many years he has toured with his own group; tonight he opens at the Vine St.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The music of guitarist John Abercrombie and pianist Marc Copland has the rare capacity to both whisper and shout. Often laid-back to the point of understatement, it can also suddenly shift into emotional and improvisatory high gear. The duo's opening set Tuesday at the start of a six-night run at the Jazz Bakery included a typically eclectic collection of numbers, many of them drawn from a new Savoy jazz album, "Second Look."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
State-of-the-art jazz was blooming all over the place Sunday night at Santa Monica's At My Place. The John Abercrombie Trio--with Marc Johnson on bass and Peter Erskine on drums--linked the music's present and past in a program that was a virtual model of contemporary improvisation. There wasn't a moment that misfired.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1986
"Jazzvisions . . . Made in America," a series of seven concerts produced by Jack Lewis, will be held in early December at the Wiltern Theater. The lineup includes "Rio Revisited" on Dec. 1, featuring Antonio Carlos Jobim and singer Gal Costa; "Jazz Africa" on Dec. 2, headlined by Herbie Hancock, with Foday Musa Suso and an African ensemble; guitarists Tal Farlow, Larry Carlton, John Abercrombie and Larry Coryell on Dec. 3; "Brazilian Knights and a Lady" Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Only a resentful rival could confuse McCoy Tyner's vigorous, lusty approach to the keyboard with a destructive intent. "There is a false rumor," Tyner said, "that I destroy pianos. I don't do that. The only ones I destroy are the bad ones." After emerging from a lengthy stint with John Coltrane (1960-65), Tyner became, during the 1970s, the most influential pianist of his generation. For many years he has toured with his own group; tonight he opens at the Vine St.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
Although technology has played a considerable role in reshaping jazz during the past decade or so, no number of synthesizers and gadgets can be blamed for what many find to be a general decline in musical quality. A case in point is John Abercrombie, the New York-based guitarist who worked the weekend at the Palace Court with bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Peter Erskine.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND
It's a bizarre, blasted place, that spot where jazz fusion, avant-garde pop music and noise for art's sake cross-fertilize each other. Captain Beefheart was a regular tourist. So was/is Frank Zappa. But Crazy-Backwards Alphabet, which played the Palomino Thursday, not only visits this quirky intersection--the band's planted a flag, built a cabin and has settled in for good.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1997 | Don Heckman
Is Jack DeJohnette just too versatile for his own good? It sometimes seems that way for an artist whose restless forays into an enormously wide array of music underscore his refusal to be pigeon-holed or over-categorized. "Oneness," not unlike a previous album, "Dancing With Nature Spirits," is DeJohnette on yet another surprise journey--a tempestuous trip through frontiers of percussive improvisation.
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