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John Adams

BOOKS
October 5, 1997 | ANDREW R.L. CAYTON, Andrew R.L. Cayton is the author of "Frontier Indiana" and coauthor of "The Midwest and the Nation: Rethinking the History of an American Region." He teaches in the history department at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio
The most dramatic event in the life of John Quincy Adams was his death. The 80-year-old congressman was stricken Feb. 21, 1848, on the floor of the House as he rose to protest the Mexican War. He lingered for two days in the speaker's private rooms before he died. It was a fitting end for Adams, not simply because he had spent virtually his entire life in government service but because he never hesitated to speak his mind, whatever the price.
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NEWS
April 21, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The church crypt containing the remains of father and son Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams will reopen despite earlier concerns that it would be closed to visitors for lack of money. Secretary of State William F. Galvin, who also is chairman of the state Historical Commission, said he will grant $15,000 to the United First Parish in Quincy, Mass., to continue to maintain the crypt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1990
The only present my family and I want this Christmas is our boys back home from Saudi Arabia. John Adams said, "We are friends of freedom everywhere, but guardians only of our own." OSCAR L. SANCHEZ San Bernardino
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The world premiere of John Adams' "Naive and Sentimental Music" by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Friday would be enough to make our city the center of the new music universe, at least for this weekend. But, in fact, the Adams' work is only one element in a half-intentional, half-serendipitous cluster of local new music events--including two concurrent festivals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Choreographer Jerome Robbins has been the forgotten man in the ongoing New York City Ballet visit to Southern California, not only inevitably overshadowed by the celebrations of George Balanchine's centennial but also yielding the stage to dance-makers Christopher Wheeldon and Peter Martins with far less justification.
NEWS
February 15, 2002 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
AMERICA'S FIRST DYNASTY The Adamses, 1735-1918 by Richard Brookhiser The Free Press $25, 256 pages At a time when a certain sentimentalism is creeping into contemporary reconsiderations of the Founding Fathers, Richard Brookhiser's new book about the Adams family comes as a bracing tonic. Brookhiser, a senior editor at William F. Buckley's National Review and a columnist for the New York Observer, admires the Adamses. He seems to share their skeptical conservatism.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
If your name is John Kennedy or John Adams , Boston's Revere Hotel has a suite for you. Anyone with the name of a Massachusetts president or nominee (yes, Michael Dukakis counts) will receive a free night in the 24th-floor presidential suite and some extras such as a haircut from Mitt Romney 's stylist. The deal: I can't imagine there are a lot of Michael Dukakises around, so I'm guessing Kennedys and Adamses might win the suite. Women can play too if their name is Abigail Adams or another first lady from Massachusetts.
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