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John Adams

NEWS
March 24, 2002 | LAWRENCE L. KNUTSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Realistic or sentimental, full of hope or delivered with an eye on the history books, the final words of America's presidents have been dutifully recorded ever since George Washington uttered his on Dec. 14, 1799. "I die hard, but I am not afraid to go," Washington told his doctor after being stricken with a violent throat infection at his Mount Vernon, Va., estate. He was 67. John Adams, who lived to be 91, approached his demise with humor.
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NEWS
April 21, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The church crypt containing the remains of father and son Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams will reopen despite earlier concerns that it would be closed to visitors for lack of money. Secretary of State William F. Galvin, who also is chairman of the state Historical Commission, said he will grant $15,000 to the United First Parish in Quincy, Mass., to continue to maintain the crypt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1990
The only present my family and I want this Christmas is our boys back home from Saudi Arabia. John Adams said, "We are friends of freedom everywhere, but guardians only of our own." OSCAR L. SANCHEZ San Bernardino
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The world premiere of John Adams' "Naive and Sentimental Music" by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Friday would be enough to make our city the center of the new music universe, at least for this weekend. But, in fact, the Adams' work is only one element in a half-intentional, half-serendipitous cluster of local new music events--including two concurrent festivals.
OPINION
July 4, 2006 | Richard Brookhiser, RICHARD BROOKHISER is the author of "What Would the Founders Do: Our Questions, Their Answers."
IF SUPERMAN CAN return to help us, why can't America's founders? It's true, Superman is alive and the founders are not. On the other hand, Superman is fictional, whereas Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Hamilton and the rest were flesh-and-blood politicians, dealing with problems surprisingly similar to our own and establishing the laws and institutions we still use to confront those problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Choreographer Jerome Robbins has been the forgotten man in the ongoing New York City Ballet visit to Southern California, not only inevitably overshadowed by the celebrations of George Balanchine's centennial but also yielding the stage to dance-makers Christopher Wheeldon and Peter Martins with far less justification.
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