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John Allen Muhammad

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November 11, 2009 | Scott Calvert
A defiant John Allen Muhammad, who terrified the Washington area in 2002 as he orchestrated a series of sniper shootings, including 10 murders, was executed by lethal injection Tuesday night. Muhammad, 48, was pronounced dead at 9:11 p.m., said Larry Traylor, spokesman for the Virginia Department of Corrections. Asked if he wanted to make a last statement, Muhammad "did not acknowledge us," Traylor said outside the Greensville Correctional Center. The execution took place without incident, he said.
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NATIONAL
November 11, 2009 | Scott Calvert
A defiant John Allen Muhammad, who terrified the Washington area in 2002 as he orchestrated a series of sniper shootings, including 10 murders, was executed by lethal injection Tuesday night. Muhammad, 48, was pronounced dead at 9:11 p.m., said Larry Traylor, spokesman for the Virginia Department of Corrections. Asked if he wanted to make a last statement, Muhammad "did not acknowledge us," Traylor said outside the Greensville Correctional Center. The execution took place without incident, he said.
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NATIONAL
October 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
A jury of 12 people was seated Friday for the murder trial of sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad. Opening statements in the trial of the 42-year-old Army veteran are expected to begin Monday. The jury, with three alternates, includes some members with ties to the military -- an expected mix in a community with large Navy installations. The 10 women and five men, 13 whites and two blacks were culled from a pool of 123.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2009 | David G. Savage
Seven years ago this month, the captured Beltway snipers -- John Allen Muhammad, 41, and his accomplice, Lee Boyd Malvo, 17 -- were in federal custody, accused of 16 shootings and 10 murders. They had set out to create a reign of terror in the Washington area to match the 9/11 attacks of the year before. U.S. Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft had a choice: He could send them to be tried in Maryland, where most of the murders took place but where the death penalty was on hold because of the specter of racial unfairness.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2003 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
After speaking his mind, John Allen Muhammad has retreated into silence. His blank face, half-hidden in a cupped fist, does not betray him now. A parade of witnesses who said they glimpsed Muhammad and the car he drove have already constructed a powerful circumstantial case in the Washington-area sniper murder trial.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2003 | From Associated Press
More than half the people needed to complete a jury in the trial of sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad had been selected Thursday, and the prosecutor said opening statements and testimony could begin Monday. Potential jurors were quizzed Thursday about their views on the death penalty, their exposure to pretrial news accounts and whether they felt terrorized by the sniper spree that killed 10 people over a three-week period last fall.
NATIONAL
June 2, 2006 | Andrea F. Siegel, Baltimore Sun
Convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad was sentenced to six consecutive life terms without the possibility of parole Thursday. "You, Mr. Muhammad, have no hope. You have no future. You will spend every day for the rest of your life locked in a cage," Judge James L. Ryan said. "You chose the wrong county to stain with your acts of violence." Muhammad, 45, looked grim as the sentence was read, and some in the audience applauded.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2003 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
Less than half an hour after Dean Harold Meyers was felled by sniper fire a year ago, Virginia Police Officer Steven I. Bailey questioned the man who would later be arrested in his killing. After a brief conversation just yards from the blood-pooled crime scene, Bailey let John Allen Muhammad drive off, convinced by the suspect that police had routed him into a nearby parking lot as part of their dragnet.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2006 | Julie Scharper and Andrea F. Siegel, Baltimore Sun
With his murder trial entering its final days, John Allen Muhammad's once-confident tone gave way Thursday to frustration and confusion as his witnesses failed to poke holes in the elaborate case put on by prosecutors and the judge refused to extend the deadline to permit him to bring in witnesses from out of state.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2003 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
After acting as his own lawyer for two days, sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad handed control of his case back to his attorneys on Wednesday. Circuit Court Judge LeRoy F. Millette Jr., who is presiding over the case, said Muhammad had decided it was "in his best interest that he no longer represent himself." Muhammad is accused of orchestrating 13 attacks in the Washington, D.C., area a year ago that claimed 10 lives.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
State officials are seeking a Nov. 9 execution for John Allen Muhammad, mastermind of the deadly 2002 sniper attacks in the Washington area. In a letter requesting the execution date, Senior Assistant Atty. Gen. Katherine B. Burnett wrote that the request had been coordinated with the governor's office to ensure consideration of an expected clemency petition. Muhammad was sentenced to death for the slaying of Dean Harold Meyers, one of 10 people killed during the shooting rampage that terrorized the nation's capital.
NATIONAL
June 2, 2006 | Andrea F. Siegel, Baltimore Sun
Convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad was sentenced to six consecutive life terms without the possibility of parole Thursday. "You, Mr. Muhammad, have no hope. You have no future. You will spend every day for the rest of your life locked in a cage," Judge James L. Ryan said. "You chose the wrong county to stain with your acts of violence." Muhammad, 45, looked grim as the sentence was read, and some in the audience applauded.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
John Allen Muhammad was convicted in Rockville of six sniper killings after the prosecution's star witness, Muhammad's young protege, portrayed him as the mastermind of an audacious terrorist scheme. Muhammad, 45, is already under a death sentence in Virginia for a killing there. The most he can get for the six murders committed in Maryland is life in prison without parole. The jury took slightly more than four hours to convict him after a four-week trial in which he acted as his own lawyer.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2006 | Julie Scharper and Andrea F. Siegel, Baltimore Sun
With his murder trial entering its final days, John Allen Muhammad's once-confident tone gave way Thursday to frustration and confusion as his witnesses failed to poke holes in the elaborate case put on by prosecutors and the judge refused to extend the deadline to permit him to bring in witnesses from out of state.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2006 | Andrea F. Siegel and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun
Convicted sniper Lee Boyd Malvo told jurors Tuesday that had he and John Allen Muhammad not been caught, the pair planned to make Baltimore the center of a murderous campaign in which they would use explosives against children and police. Malvo, 21, said the scheme was "Phase 2" of a plan to kill a police officer with a weapon other than the .223-caliber Bushmaster rifle the pair had been using in the Washington area sniper rampage in 2002, then set off explosives against mourners.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge has granted a delay for the trial of John Allen Muhammad in the six Maryland deaths linked to the 2002 Washington-area sniper spree. Defendants are usually entitled to a trial within 180 days of arrest in Maryland or within 120 days of transfer to the state, but attorneys can ask for delays in complicated cases. After fighting extradition from Virginia, Muhammad arrived in Maryland on Aug. 22, and his trial had been set for May 1.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2003 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
As prosecutors built their case against sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad, a police officer on Friday identified the defendant's alleged partner as the young man he chased from the scene of a slaying in Montgomery, Ala., last year. Another witness testified that the gun used in that shooting was a high-velocity rifle and not the handgun held by the fleeing suspect.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad, already sentenced to death in Virginia, was transferred to Maryland for his second murder trial in the shootings that terrorized the Washington area in October 2002. Muhammad was reluctant to have his fingerprints taken or pose for a mug shot when he arrived at the jail, Montgomery County Sheriff's Deputy Chief Darren Popkin said. Muhammad joins co-defendant Lee Boyd Malvo in the maximum-security section of the Montgomery Correctional Facility in Boyds.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Sussex ordered John Allen Muhammad to be moved from Virginia's death row to Maryland for his second trial in the 2002 sniper shooting rampage in the Washington, D.C., area. Muhammad, 44, had fought the extradition but appeared to be in good spirits after the judge's ruling, grinning and laughing with his attorney. Armed guards blanketed the rural courthouse, with seven guards lining the perimeter of the courtroom. Muhammad will face trial in the slayings of six people in Maryland.
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