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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012
John Amos has demonstrated his versatility over the last four decades. Here are just three of his memorable roles: Gordon Howard Amos played Gordy the Weatherman at WJM on the classic CBS comedy series "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" for three seasons. Kunta Kinte Amos portrayed the adult slave in ABC's seminal 1977 miniseries "Roots," earning an Emmy nomination. Pastor Nelson Amos lends a dramatic element to the new comedy "Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection" as a minister who is about to retire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012
John Amos has demonstrated his versatility over the last four decades. Here are just three of his memorable roles: Gordon Howard Amos played Gordy the Weatherman at WJM on the classic CBS comedy series "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" for three seasons. Kunta Kinte Amos portrayed the adult slave in ABC's seminal 1977 miniseries "Roots," earning an Emmy nomination. Pastor Nelson Amos lends a dramatic element to the new comedy "Tyler Perry's Madea's Witness Protection" as a minister who is about to retire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
If it hadn't been for famed Kansas City Chiefs football coach Hank Stram, John Amos may never had a four-decade long career in Hollywood, including memorable acting roles in "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "Good Times" and "Roots. " A running back at Colorado State, Amos had tried out unsuccessfully for the Denver Broncos and was cut twice from the Chiefs. Stram, recalled the 72-year-old Amos, told him, "Young man, you are not a football player. You are a young man who happens to be playing football.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
If it hadn't been for famed Kansas City Chiefs football coach Hank Stram, John Amos may never had a four-decade long career in Hollywood, including memorable acting roles in "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "Good Times" and "Roots. " A running back at Colorado State, Amos had tried out unsuccessfully for the Denver Broncos and was cut twice from the Chiefs. Stram, recalled the 72-year-old Amos, told him, "Young man, you are not a football player. You are a young man who happens to be playing football.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1989 | DAVID PECCHIA
John Amos, whom we all know via his work on "Good Times" and as Kunta Kinte in "Roots," speaks unabashedly about his recent stretch in prison. No, Amos hasn't been misbehaving. It's just that playing Meissner, the menacing captain of correctional officers in "Lock Up," necessitated his being in New Jersey's dreaded Rahway Prison for a portion of the shoot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2003 | Michael Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
Just days after losing almost all his possessions in the Grand Prix fire, Dan Knight had perhaps the most bizarre experience of his life. He was riding in a Lincoln Town Car limousine to the taping of a television show. "It was unbelievably strange," said Knight, 50, a carpenter left homeless when the wind-driven blaze destroyed his Etiwanda home in the early morning hours of Oct. 24. "We had lost everything, and here we were in a limo heading to a television show."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Lock Up" (citywide) is yet another Sylvester Stallone macho fantasy in which he plays an underdog of superhuman endurance. Once again, his ability to survive extreme brutality is used to justify equally savage acts of revenge. As experienced a rabble-rouser as Stallone is, he by now defies credibility to the point of inviting unintended laughter.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Esther Rolle, a sharecropper's daughter who grew up to become a respected actress and role model for other blacks, has died. She was 78. Rolle, best remembered for her portrayal of the strong mother on the hit television sitcom "Good Times," died Tuesday night in Los Angeles, publicist Pat Tobin said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ernest Borgnine seemed born to play the heavy when he burst onto the Hollywood scene as "Fatso" Judson, a sadistic stockade sergeant who viciously beats a private to death in the 1953 movie "From Here to Eternity. " But two years later came the title role in "Marty," where the stocky, gap-toothed Borgnine defied typecasting and earned recognition as a versatile actor by inhabiting the part of a lonely Bronx butcher looking for love. He went on to a prolific seven-decade career in film and television, moving easily from scoundrels and serious portrayals to a comedic role on the 1960s TV sitcom "McHale's Navy" and a spate of grandfatherly parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Trial Watch: Veteran film star Anthony Quinn, 76, is the latest celebrity to drop by the federal courthouse in Brooklyn to watch some of the murder-racketeering trial of reputed mobster John Gotti. "I came because I want to make a picture about this drama," Quinn said. Quinn tried to speak with Gotti but federal marshals kept Gotti away. Actors Mickey Rourke and John Amos also have watched the Gotti proceedings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2003 | Michael Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
Just days after losing almost all his possessions in the Grand Prix fire, Dan Knight had perhaps the most bizarre experience of his life. He was riding in a Lincoln Town Car limousine to the taping of a television show. "It was unbelievably strange," said Knight, 50, a carpenter left homeless when the wind-driven blaze destroyed his Etiwanda home in the early morning hours of Oct. 24. "We had lost everything, and here we were in a limo heading to a television show."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1989 | DAVID PECCHIA
John Amos, whom we all know via his work on "Good Times" and as Kunta Kinte in "Roots," speaks unabashedly about his recent stretch in prison. No, Amos hasn't been misbehaving. It's just that playing Meissner, the menacing captain of correctional officers in "Lock Up," necessitated his being in New Jersey's dreaded Rahway Prison for a portion of the shoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1999 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a Times staff writer
It is 1:30 a.m. and Aaron Sorkin is slouched in a director's chair, commiserating with Rob Lowe between scenes on the set of "The West Wing." The new NBC drama, which co-stars Lowe as a harried White House speech writer, is one of two shows, along with ABC's "Sports Night," created by Sorkin in his young career as TV's new golden boy. Right now the golden boy is beleaguered and exhausted. Up at dawn, Sorkin has been going at a David E. Kelley-style pace, writing every episode of both shows.
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