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John Anderson

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NEWS
January 5, 2000 | Associated Press
John Anderson, the independent who captured 7% of the presidential vote in 1980, will appear this year as a Reform Party candidate on California's March 7 primary ballot. Although California Reform Party leaders asked the secretary of state to place his name on the ballot, he has not filed a statement of candidacy or set up a federal campaign committee. The secretary of state's office confirmed Anderson's spot on the ballot Tuesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2011
A funeral service for John E. Anderson, a billionaire businessman, philanthropist and namesake of UCLA's graduate school of management, will be held at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at Westwood United Methodist Church, 10497 Wilshire Blvd. He died Friday at 93.
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NEWS
August 17, 1992
A service honoring character actor John Anderson, who died Aug. 7 at age 69, is scheduled for 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Westwood Playhouse. The family has asked that memorial contributions be made to the Screen Actors Guild Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
John E. Anderson, a Bel-Air billionaire businessman and philanthropist who founded Topa Equities Ltd. and was the namesake of UCLA's graduate school of management, died Friday morning. He was 93. Anderson died of pneumonia at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, a family spokesperson said. A self-made man whose net worth of $2.4 billion placed him at No. 153 on the 2010 Forbes list of the 400 richest Americans, Anderson was the founder, president and chief executive of the privately owned Topa Equities Ltd. The Century City-headquartered holding company owns 33 subsidiaries involved in insurance, real estate, financial services, wholesale beverage distribution, automobile dealerships and manufacturing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We'll be swingin,' " John Anderson twanged during the chorus of a blithely rocking hit in 1982 that helped secure his long tenure in country music. Little did Anderson know how accurate "Swingin' " would be as a predictor of his career. If you made a graph of his sales progress over the years, the lines would swing indeed, with a couple of rises and plunges steep enough to delight a roller-coaster buff but potentially nerve-racking for anyone riding not for thrills but for keeps.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1993 | NOEL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ralph Emery once asked John Anderson why on one of his hit records, the background singers clearly articulated the word "swingin' " while he drawled "swangin'." "Someone has to sing it properly," Anderson replied, "because I sure cain't." Anderson's inventive, note-curling, language-pulverizing style has placed him on a par with George Jones when it comes to making, by vocal acrobatics alone, virtually any song a delight to listen to.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
Five years ago, John Anderson was one of the hottest young male vocalists in country music. But somehow, the Apopka, Fla., born singer managed to get lost in the shuffle as such peers as Ricky Skaggs, George Strait and Randy Travis all passed up the craggy-voiced singer on the charts. Maybe it was because Anderson, who plays the Crazy Horse in Santa Ana tonight, has never been particularly concerned with having a carefully groomed "look" and isn't the sort to hire himself an image stylist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1994 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Anderson's voice is better than money in the bank, to paraphrase one of the hits that contributed to his now long-running comeback story. * The trouble on Monday at the Crazy Horse was getting your hands on it. Between a sound mix that reduced his singing to the level of the band's instruments and Anderson's habit of bobbing his head in and out of microphone range, the voice that should have commanded the performance was as elusive as money in a sinking S&L.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
Like a blue chip stock, John Anderson has managed to ride out cyclical changes in the country music business--sometimes up, sometimes down--over the past 15 years, but always on the board and paying dividends to fans who have invested in his records and shows. Raised in the central Florida town of Apopka, he took his first musical steps playing rock 'n' roll inspired by the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. But by age 17 he had headed to Nashville, Tenn.
SPORTS
November 15, 1992 | KIM Q. BERKSHIRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time, given the brief history of the Gulls, that a two-game winning streak against an opponent would be reason enough to welcome the home team back to its arena with open arms. Predictably, the Gulls' third triumph in four days over the Salt Lake Golden Eagles--a 4-1 IHL decision Saturday at the Sports Arena--charmed the masses. So, what's new? Sweeping an adversary has become a common occurrence for the Gulls. Ft. Wayne, Kansas City, Kalamazoo.
MAGAZINE
May 7, 2006
Dan Neil's column "Towels Optional" (800 Words, April 16) made me chuckle. I'm one of those guys: 60 years old, 25 pounds overweight, sporting a saggy butt. I'm a white guy, but my gym buddies are mostly black and Latino and under 40. We're all from different walks of life. We lie, shower and sweat together. I wouldn't trade it for anything. John Anderson Torrance I can tell you why the graying group in the locker room seems so casual about covering up. When I was in school, physical education was mandatory every day--no exceptions unless you were sick or injured.
NEWS
March 30, 2006
Thank you for your article "Like Movies? Join the Club" [by Greg Braxton, March 23]. It's a great introduction to the wide variety of movie clubs available in Los Angeles. However, there's another film series your readers might enjoy. The nation's longest-running (since 1979) and most popular film series is UCLA Extension's Sneak Preview series. Sneak Preview is offered this spring and summer on Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. in the state-of-the-art Writers Guild Theater and is hosted each quarter by a top Hollywood film critic or columnist, including such luminaries as Anne Thompson, Pete Hammond, John Anderson and Kirk Honeycutt.
MAGAZINE
March 26, 2006 | John Anderson, John Anderson was film critic for Newsday for 15 years. He is the coauthor of "I Wake Up Screening," to be published next month.
At last count, I have been to a thousand film festivals in a hundred countries. Or maybe it just feels that way. Whatever the number is, it's a lot, and only a fraction of what's out there. Film festivals have become the tourist attraction du jour, their growing numbers just part of the continued scramble to pull in dollars, extend the "season" at already hot spots and bring cultural cachet to otherwise intellectually drought-ridden areas of planet Earth.
MAGAZINE
April 17, 2005
I think I see the real reason why Mark Helprin dislikes "the posturing and crowing of post-election Republicans" ("Dressing Down the Primitives," by John Anderson, March 13). Perhaps he recalls a different party doing the same thing a couple of generations ago: announcing the death of the opposition party, knowing they had all the answers, etc. I'm certain he also recognizes that the resounding victory was not all that pronounced, and that some of the slim margins involved were driven by fear rather than conviction: fear of homosexuality, fear of stem-cell research, fear of terrorists.
TRAVEL
December 19, 2004
I began to run out of cash after a few days in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, so I tried every bank within a mile of my hotel only to have my card immediately rejected or the transaction eventually canceled. A resident American suggested an ATM at a local bank. I approached the ATM, put in my card, entered my PIN and chose the amount of currency I wanted. The machine whirred; my hopes escalated. The ATM spat out my card with a receipt that said "Transaction canceled." I tried again.
SPORTS
October 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
John Anderson kicked a 30-yard field as time expired and No. 13 Washington rallied for yet another comeback victory, defeating Arizona State, 33-31, on Saturday night at Tempe, Ariz. Willie Hurst ran for 185 yards for Washington (6-1, 4-1 Pacific 10 Conference), which has made five successful fourth-quarter comebacks this season. The Huskies trailed 31-30 when they started the winning drive from their own 10-yard line with 7:12 left.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He has a voice rather like a honey-filled beehive. But John Anderson makes his singing even more unusual by way of what nearly seems a musical nervous tic: Triggered by the emotional rhythms of his songs, his head frequently flinches away from his microphone as he sings, causing his voice to fade in and out in a way that curiously enhances the feeling in his phrasing. One nearly expects him to employ the same technique with his telephone.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Anderson may not smash guitars or video-dance the way some country music's newer sensations do, but he sure can sing. It's reassuring that such a basic quality still matters in the booming country biz. It seemed for a while that Anderson had gotten lost in the shuffle. After a breakthrough run of three No. 1 hits in 1982 and '83, it appeared he could do no wrong, and he didn't.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | Associated Press
John Anderson, the independent who captured 7% of the presidential vote in 1980, will appear this year as a Reform Party candidate on California's March 7 primary ballot. Although California Reform Party leaders asked the secretary of state to place his name on the ballot, he has not filed a statement of candidacy or set up a federal campaign committee. The secretary of state's office confirmed Anderson's spot on the ballot Tuesday.
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