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John Arnone

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If recent pop culture can be succinctly described, it might be called the Age of the Designer. It started with designer jeans, and now it's extended all the way to designer hand vacuums. The demand for designed goods, cars and living spaces are all telling signs of an ever-growing interest in how things look, and diminished interest in what's inside the package. We have all heard the dangers of form over substance in many areas of society, and it's also discussed in the theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If recent pop culture can be succinctly described, it might be called the Age of the Designer. It started with designer jeans, and now it's extended all the way to designer hand vacuums. The demand for designed goods, cars and living spaces are all telling signs of an ever-growing interest in how things look, and diminished interest in what's inside the package. We have all heard the dangers of form over substance in many areas of society, and it's also discussed in the theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1993
Here is a complete list of winners of Broadway's 1993 Tony Awards announced Sunday: *Play: "Angels in America: Millennium Approaches." *Musical: "Kiss of the Spider Woman." *Revival: Roundabout Theatre Company's "Anna Christie" *Book of a musical: Terrence McNally, "Kiss of the Spider Woman." *Original score: (tie) John Kander and Fred Ebb, "Kiss of the Spider Woman"; Pete Townshend, "The Who's Tommy." *Director/musical: Des McAnuff, "The Who's Tommy." *Director/play: George C.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2001
While I didn't love "Dracula," I did enjoy myself, mostly due to the talents of director Des McAnuff and scenic designer John Arnone ("Money Talks; It May Not Sing," by Michael Phillips, Nov. 25). I don't, however, agree with Phillips' assessment of Frank Wildhorn. I found the book and lyrics to the show (not by Wildhorn) to be ridiculously amateurish and often just really bad. I shouldn't have been surprised, considering it was the same "Sunset Boulevard" writers that brought us the song "Let's Do Lunch" (which was later changed to "Let's Have Lunch" when they found out that people didn't "do" lunch back then)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
A funny thing happened on the way to the La Jolla Playhouse: "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" became high-class entertainment. That's Entertainment with a capital E, not a capital H, as in high-brow, which "Forum" could/should never be.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Amid the bustle of deranged psyches running amok on stage in the final moments of "What the Butler Saw" at the Mandell Weiss Forum on Sunday, one line stood out above the din: "You can't be a rationalist in an irrational world," yelled the hyperkinetic Dr. Rance. "It isn't rational!" If the line--and the play--provoked ripples of comic shock in 1967, when Joe Orton wrote it, it is met now, 25 years later, with yelps of recognition. Society has become Ortonesque.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Woman. Manipulator or manipulated? Mantis or mannequin? The question, in a world largely ruled by men, has been ceaselessly debated, while the prototype is as ancient as Hatshepsut of Egypt and as recent as Marilyn Monroe. Prominent in the torrent of history/books/films/plays that has coursed between these prototypes is Frank Wedekind's sexually fraught "Lulu," unpublishable when written in 1895, later unevenly divided into two tamer plays retitled "Earthspirit" and "Pandora's Box."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
A funny thing happened on the way to the La Jolla Playhouse: "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" became high class entertainment. That's Entertainment with a capital E, not a capital H, as in high-brow, which "Forum" could/should never be.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Fast-lane people who leave the city for the supposed serenity and stability of rural roads are the theme of the month at La Jolla Playhouse, with two productions examining ex-urbanites. The premiere of Tom Donaghy's "Eden Lane" in the Mandell Weiss Theatre is more engaging than Martin Crimp's "The Country," in the smaller, adjacent Mandell Weiss Forum. Both plays share an elliptical quality. In "Eden Lane," as in "The Country," some details are not spelled out.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Director Mark Lamos dresses up his actors in "The School for Wives" at the La Jolla Playhouse to suggest silent-movie archetypes. Arnolphe (Gerry Bamman) makes us think of Chaplin, with his derby hat and mustache. His ward, Agnes (Barbara Howard), might be Mary Pickford. The gimmick doesn't particularly serve the story.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
It's difficult to tell just where the La Jolla Playhouse's inaugural production of the season, Chekhov's "Three Sisters," went awry, but one suspects it was early on.
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