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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001
Thank you for that sobering and incisive assessment of John Ashcroft's nomination for attorney general ("The Conscience of a Pentecostal," by Martin E. Marty, Opinion, Jan. 28). I too am an evangelical Christian committed to scriptural truths and commands. Thus I find it breathtakingly appalling that Ashcroft is so power-hungry he would willingly subscribe to enforcing laws he declares he finds totally unscriptural and abhorrent. Either this means he is intending to change or subvert those laws--or has no moral convictions whatever.
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OPINION
June 10, 2011
Not for the first time, the Supreme Court has refused to hold high government officials responsible for outrageous abuses of human rights. Late last month, the court rejected a lawsuit against former Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft by a U.S. citizen who was unfairly imprisoned and mistreated under the pretense of securing his appearance as a witness. Abdullah Kidd, a convert to Islam who was known as Lavoni Kidd when he played football for the University of Idaho, claimed that Ashcroft had authorized a policy of using the material witness statute — designed to ensure the presence of witnesses at trial — as a way of holding suspected terrorists when there was no probable cause to do so. Kidd was detained at Dulles International Airport in 2003 as he prepared to fly to Saudi Arabia to study.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2001
Re "Ashcroft, Under Fire, Vows to Uphold the Law," Jan. 17: George W. Bush's campaign platform of bipartisanship means little if John Ashcroft is confirmed as attorney general. It is not a question of whether he will uphold the law. It becomes a question of how far to the right can the president-elect go from his "middle of the road" campaign. Especially after the campaign debacle that left him without a true mandate. This nomination does not lend itself to bringing the two parties together.
NATIONAL
June 1, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court, unanimously throwing out a suit against former Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft from someone arrested but never used as a material witness in a terrorism case, has now erected a broad shield protecting the government and Bush administration officials for their conduct in the war on terrorism. The justices have repeatedly rejected lawsuits from civil libertarians who contended top officials had stretched the law and violated the Constitution by ordering the arrest of Muslim men in the U.S. and abroad, most of whom were never charged with terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2001 | TED LAPKIN, Ted Lapkin, former communications director for Rep. Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.), does communications strategy for a trade association in Arlington, Va
In the 18th century, Samuel Johnson coined his famous aphorism that "patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel." Yet if Johnson were alive today to witness the hurly-burly of modern political discourse, he might very well say "the charge of racism is the last refuge of the American left."
NEWS
January 5, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Elizabeth Dole, wife of 1996 Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole, cracked open the door to a White House bid of her own Monday, even as Missouri Sen. John Ashcroft, a favorite of conservatives, appeared to be edging away from the race. In announcing her resignation as president of the American Red Cross, Dole indicated that she intends to explore the possibility of seeking next year's GOP presidential nomination.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Congressional Black Caucus vented their rage on a panoply of racially tinged issues during an hourlong meeting Wednesday evening with President Bush. The president agreed to work with the black Democrats on election reforms but he neither agreed with their criticisms of nor defended his appointment of John Ashcroft as attorney general, according to meeting participants. "The meeting was very businesslike, very civil and very relaxed," said Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.).
NATIONAL
March 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft remained hospitalized in an intensive care unit for treatment of a severe pancreatitis. Doctors were awaiting results of tests before deciding on their next steps.
NEWS
December 21, 1985 | Associated Press
Gov. John Ashcroft will be that rarity in life--a speechless politician--for up to two weeks while he recovers from surgery to remove a polyp from his vocal chords. Ashcroft underwent the surgery Friday and is under doctors' orders not to talk for 10 days to two weeks.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Sen. Jean Carnahan (D-Mo.) voted against the nomination of John Ashcroft in her first high-profile vote since taking the seat her late husband won from Ashcroft in November. In a statement issued by her office, Carnahan said she had heeded her conscience in deciding to vote against Ashcroft. "I do not believe that the nomination of John Ashcroft furthers the conciliatory tone that President Bush has set," she said. Her husband, Missouri Gov.
OPINION
March 5, 2011
On Wednesday, the Supreme Court was asked to help right an egregious violation of human rights that occurred in the aftermath of 9/11. The case involved a U.S. citizen who was confined for two weeks on the pretext of securing his testimony at someone else's trial. In fact, the government regarded him as a suspect but had no probable cause to hold him. A majority of the court seemed unsympathetic to Abdullah Kidd's attempt to sue former Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft for the mistreatment.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court intervened again Monday in a lawsuit against a former George W. Bush administration official, agreeing to decide whether former Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft is entirely shielded from claims that he misused the law to arrest terrorism suspects under false pretenses. Obama administration lawyers appealed on Ashcroft's behalf and asserted that it would "severely damage law enforcement" if the nation's top law enforcement official could be held liable for abusing his authority.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court served notice Monday that it would set a high bar for anyone seeking to hold top government officials liable for abuse suffered by prisoners held as part of the Bush administration's war on terrorism. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy spoke for a 5-4 majority in throwing out a lawsuit against former Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft and FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III that claimed the two ordered the roundup of hundreds of Muslim men after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
OPINION
July 5, 2008
Re "Tainted justice," Opinion, June 28 Bruce J. Einhorn is incorrect in one respect. It was not John Ashcroft and Alberto R. Gonzales alone, as attorneys general, who established the hiring policy at the Department of Justice, but rather it was under the direction of their boss. Clearly, President Bush himself has tainted the department by requiring politically-based hirings in areas that have been historically apolitical. To write an opinion article that doesn't mention our president in this matter is not fully accurate or reasonable, despite such an article being otherwise correct in its condemnation.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court rejected the Bush administration's challenge to the nation's only right-to-die law Tuesday, ruling that then-Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft had overstepped his authority when he sought to punish Oregon doctors who helped terminally ill patients end their lives. The 6-3 decision was a victory for states and their independent-minded voters, and a defeat for social conservatives. The case also showed Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
With barely a word about it, on Friday workers at the Justice Department removed the blue drapes that had famously covered two scantily clad statues for the last 3 1/2 years. "Spirit of Justice," with one breast exposed and her arms raised, and the bare-chested male "Majesty of Law" basked in the late afternoon light of Justice's ceremonial Great Hall. The drapes, installed in 2002 at a cost of $8,000, allowed then-Atty. Gen.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Departing Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft, warning Tuesday that a recent Supreme Court decision could lead to more lenient treatment of violent offenders, called on Congress to enact tougher federal sentencing guidelines. Ashcroft, who is to leave office once his replacement is approved by the Senate -- probably Thursday -- also said his greatest regret as the nation's highest law enforcement officer for the last four years was not adequately explaining the Patriot Act to the American people.
OPINION
November 28, 2004 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today. E-mail: jpett@herald-leader.com.
For the Bush administration, it's been a four-year feast. Jeb set the table. Scalia and Thomas held court at the bar. Don Rumsfeld served up the biggest freedom-range turkey in memory, with stuffing from a new European recipe. W's eggnog got ever richer. Laura provided the sweet-potato pie, and the twins smuggled in the hooch. Karl Rove made sure everyone got their just desserts, while cantankerous Uncle Dick grabbed the remote and growled at America's Team to launch another bomb.
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