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NEWS
June 16, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John B. Connally, the embodiment of the larger-than-life Texas politician who first came to national prominence 30 years ago when he was wounded during the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, died Tuesday. He was 76. He was admitted to Houston's Methodist Hospital on May 17, complaining of a breathing obstruction. His condition was complicated by infection and pneumonia and he had been in critical condition for most of his hospital stay.
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NEWS
June 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Hundreds of mourners, including Lady Bird Johnson and former President Richard Nixon, paid their last respects Thursday to former Gov. John B. Connally. His family refused to comment about whether bullet fragments lodged in Connally's wrist and thigh during the assassination of President John F. Kennedy were removed before burial, as requested by private researchers. Connally died Tuesday of pulmonary fibrosis. He was 76.
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NEWS
June 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Hundreds of mourners, including Lady Bird Johnson and former President Richard Nixon, paid their last respects Thursday to former Gov. John B. Connally. His family refused to comment about whether bullet fragments lodged in Connally's wrist and thigh during the assassination of President John F. Kennedy were removed before burial, as requested by private researchers. Connally died Tuesday of pulmonary fibrosis. He was 76.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | The Washington Post
Former Texas Gov. John B. Connally was buried Thursday in Austin after a frantic and unsuccessful effort to get family permission to extract bullet fragments left in his body almost 30 years ago. Hundreds of mourners attended the rites. FBI officials in Dallas had recommended that an attempt be made to recover the evidence and settle a longstanding controversy about whether Connally was hit by the same bullet that wounded President John F. Kennedy on Nov.
NEWS
January 27, 1988
The four-day auction in Houston of possessions belonging to former Texas Gov. John B. Connally and his wife, Nellie, ended and netted more than $2.6 million, auctioneers estimated. Connally, 70, had actively promoted the sale for months to help repay his creditors. The three-time governor and former Treasury secretary under President Richard M. Nixon last year filed for bankruptcy stemming from failed real estate ventures. He said last week he was about $48 million in debt.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1989 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
The last name of the spokesman for Lincoln Savings & Loan in Irvine and its parent firm should look familiar. It's Connally, as in John B. Connally, the former Texas governor and presidential candidate. The spokesman is the former politician's youngest son, Mark M. Connally. Before taking on his new duties, the 36-year-old Connally worked for Lincoln's parent firm, American Continental Corp., overseeing land development and loan administration at its Tucson office for the last 2 years.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | John Balzar
Former Texas Gov. John B. Connally on Friday endorsed Kansas Sen. Bob Dole for President. Connally's recent auctioning of his wordly possessions was the humiliation of a lifetime and his 1980 presidential campaign was ridiculed for producing only a single delegate, so his endorsement may not be the most important announcement of this year's Republican race. But Dole nevertheless rushed off to Houston when Connally called and happily accepted the endorsement.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A research center that has studied the John F. Kennedy assassination on Wednesday urged the Justice Department to retrieve bullet fragments from the body of former Texas Gov. John B. Connally, contending that they may resolve the controversy over whether President Kennedy and Connally were hit by one bullet. James H.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John B. Connally, the embodiment of the larger-than-life Texas politician who first came to national prominence 30 years ago when he was wounded during the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, died Tuesday. He was 76. He was admitted to Houston's Methodist Hospital on May 17, complaining of a breathing obstruction. His condition was complicated by infection and pneumonia and he had been in critical condition for most of his hospital stay.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross Perot says North Vietnamese agents put his family on an assassination hit list two decades ago when Perot was conducting a highly-publicized campaign to improve the treatment of American prisoners of war. The possible presidential contender said the North Vietnamese went to Canada and passed a list of assassination targets to sympathizers in the United States.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the greetings and tears of relatives and friends, 21 American hostages arrived here before dawn Sunday on a chartered freedom flight from Iraq that was arranged partly through the efforts of former Texas Gov. John B. Connally. It had been the first such group to leave Iraq since that country's president, Saddam Hussein, ordered all hostages freed late last week. Their arrival also gave a glimpse into how foreigners hiding in Kuwait managed to survive the long months of Iraqi occupation.
NEWS
December 9, 1990
About 500 foreign hostages, including 22 Americans, left Iraq for home. The Americans and eight relatives traveled on a special flight arranged by former Treasury Secretary John B. Connally and Texas oilman Oscar S. Wyatt. The hostage airlifts apparently were negotiated before Iraq's blanket offer to free all hostages. Meanwhile, foreign nationals who had been held as "human shields" at strategic sites in Iraq streamed into Baghdad in anticipation of their imminent release.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two Texans pulled no punches, and they reported that Saddam Hussein listened intently as they made their strong plea. Release all the hostages, they urged the Iraqi president. The "human shields" are doing you no good, they said they told him. And they will not be a deciding factor if President Bush should order an attack against Iraq. So why keep them? Let them go, John B. Connally and Oscar S. Wyatt said to Hussein. "It's hurting you in the eyes of the world," said Connally, a former U.S.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | The Washington Post
Former Texas Gov. John B. Connally was buried Thursday in Austin after a frantic and unsuccessful effort to get family permission to extract bullet fragments left in his body almost 30 years ago. Hundreds of mourners attended the rites. FBI officials in Dallas had recommended that an attempt be made to recover the evidence and settle a longstanding controversy about whether Connally was hit by the same bullet that wounded President John F. Kennedy on Nov.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Free at last, about 500 foreign hostages, including 22 Americans, began flying home Saturday night, becoming the first to leave here following Saddam Hussein's declaration of general amnesty for all foreigners in Iraq and Kuwait. Another 400 or more Americans are expected to leave today, a senior U.S. Embassy official in Baghdad said Saturday night.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1989 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
The last name of the spokesman for Lincoln Savings & Loan in Irvine and its parent firm should look familiar. It's Connally, as in John B. Connally, the former Texas governor and presidential candidate. The spokesman is the former politician's youngest son, Mark M. Connally. Before taking on his new duties, the 36-year-old Connally worked for Lincoln's parent firm, American Continental Corp., overseeing land development and loan administration at its Tucson office for the last 2 years.
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