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John Barry

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
John Barry, a five-time Academy Award-winning composer of movies such as "Born Free" and "Out of Africa" who earned a prominent spot in pop-culture history by writing the scores for 11 James Bond films, including "From Russia With Love" and " Goldfinger ," has died. He was 77. FOR THE RECORD: John Barry: On the cover of the Feb. 1 LATExtra section, the obituary of Academy Award-winning composer John Barry incorrectly included a photo of editor Neil Travis, a fellow Oscar winner.
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NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Model Lindsay Ellingson, seen Tuesday night walking in the Victoria's Secret Fashion Show on CBS, has become engaged to boyfriend Sean Clayton, a medical sales representative. Clayton reportedly proposed over the Thanksgiving holiday, between the time when the fashion show was taped on Nov. 13 and its airing on TV. [People] Singer Erykah Badu is the new celebrity face of Givenchy. She'll appear in the label's spring campaign. [Style.com] Van Cleef & Arpels celebrated the opening of its redesigned Manhattan flagship this week with a "flash ballet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
The focus here isn't on the James Bond film scores for which Barry is best known today but the composer-bandleader's earlier pop-rock recordings in England. The 37 tracks range from rockabilly ventures to, mostly, guitar-driven instrumentals. It's on the latter that Barry begins to move toward the Bond sound, mixing rock and exotic pop. This should be of special interest to fans of today's "bachelor pad" trend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul Church, State, and the Birth of Liberty John M. Barry Viking: 465 pp., $35 There's a recurring theme among the religiously political/politically religious that the United States was founded as a Christian nation and that in this modern era we have somehow strayed from God and from our roots. John M. Barry's new book "Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul: Church, State, and the Birth of Liberty" is a counterargument and it is a significant reminder of whence, exactly, this little experiment in democracy of ours came.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Veteran film composer John Barry receives the Palm Springs International Film Festival's Frederick Loewe Award on Saturday night--the latest in a series of honors for the Englishman who's won five Oscars, for the music of "Born Free" (song and score), "The Lion in Winter," "Out of Africa" and "Dances With Wolves." His other films include such classics as "Midnight Cowboy" and "Body Heat."
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Model Lindsay Ellingson, seen Tuesday night walking in the Victoria's Secret Fashion Show on CBS, has become engaged to boyfriend Sean Clayton, a medical sales representative. Clayton reportedly proposed over the Thanksgiving holiday, between the time when the fashion show was taped on Nov. 13 and its airing on TV. [People] Singer Erykah Badu is the new celebrity face of Givenchy. She'll appear in the label's spring campaign. [Style.com] Van Cleef & Arpels celebrated the opening of its redesigned Manhattan flagship this week with a "flash ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul Church, State, and the Birth of Liberty John M. Barry Viking: 465 pp., $35 There's a recurring theme among the religiously political/politically religious that the United States was founded as a Christian nation and that in this modern era we have somehow strayed from God and from our roots. John M. Barry's new book "Roger Williams and the Creation of the American Soul: Church, State, and the Birth of Liberty" is a counterargument and it is a significant reminder of whence, exactly, this little experiment in democracy of ours came.
BOOKS
February 8, 2004 | Alfred W. Crosby, Alfred W. Crosby, professor emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin, is the author of many books, including "America's Forgotten Pandemic: The Influenza of 1918."
Afraid of the flu? This flu season had people running scared and heading to their doctors for the vaccine after deaths made headlines around the nation. Now the public is fearfully watching the progress of avian flu across Southeast Asia. Don't panic, please, though concern is justified: Lest we forget, the influenza pandemic of 1918-19, in terms of numbers of deaths, was the worst thing that ever happened to the human species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2009 | Tony Perry
John Barry, the unpretentious Midwesterner who made a San Diego product called WD-40 into a national sensation by "breaking all the Harvard Business School rules," died July 3 at a skilled nursing facility in La Jolla of pulmonary fibrosis. He was 84. Barry's business genius during three decades at the company was in emphasizing brand loyalty for a lubricant that fights rust and eliminates squeaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2011 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
John Barry, a five-time Academy Award-winning composer of movies such as "Born Free" and "Out of Africa" who earned a prominent spot in pop-culture history by writing the scores for 11 James Bond films, including "From Russia With Love" and " Goldfinger ," has died. He was 77. FOR THE RECORD: John Barry: On the cover of the Feb. 1 LATExtra section, the obituary of Academy Award-winning composer John Barry incorrectly included a photo of editor Neil Travis, a fellow Oscar winner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2009 | Tony Perry
John Barry, the unpretentious Midwesterner who made a San Diego product called WD-40 into a national sensation by "breaking all the Harvard Business School rules," died July 3 at a skilled nursing facility in La Jolla of pulmonary fibrosis. He was 84. Barry's business genius during three decades at the company was in emphasizing brand loyalty for a lubricant that fights rust and eliminates squeaks.
BOOKS
February 8, 2004 | Alfred W. Crosby, Alfred W. Crosby, professor emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin, is the author of many books, including "America's Forgotten Pandemic: The Influenza of 1918."
Afraid of the flu? This flu season had people running scared and heading to their doctors for the vaccine after deaths made headlines around the nation. Now the public is fearfully watching the progress of avian flu across Southeast Asia. Don't panic, please, though concern is justified: Lest we forget, the influenza pandemic of 1918-19, in terms of numbers of deaths, was the worst thing that ever happened to the human species.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Veteran film composer John Barry receives the Palm Springs International Film Festival's Frederick Loewe Award on Saturday night--the latest in a series of honors for the Englishman who's won five Oscars, for the music of "Born Free" (song and score), "The Lion in Winter," "Out of Africa" and "Dances With Wolves." His other films include such classics as "Midnight Cowboy" and "Body Heat."
BOOKS
April 6, 1997 | JIM SQUIRES, Jim Squires is the author of "Secrets of the Hopewell Box" and "Read All About It: The Corporate Takeover of America's Newspapers."
The sea is around us, T.S. Eliot wrote, but the river is in us. Flowing through Eliot's mind was the majestic Mississippi on whose banks he was born; to him, it was a "strong brown God--sullen, untamed and intractable." Due in no small measure to Eliot, Mark Twain and Oscar Hammerstein, the Mississippi became the river of American consciousness and the river in us all.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
The focus here isn't on the James Bond film scores for which Barry is best known today but the composer-bandleader's earlier pop-rock recordings in England. The 37 tracks range from rockabilly ventures to, mostly, guitar-driven instrumentals. It's on the latter that Barry begins to move toward the Bond sound, mixing rock and exotic pop. This should be of special interest to fans of today's "bachelor pad" trend.
BOOKS
April 6, 1997 | JIM SQUIRES, Jim Squires is the author of "Secrets of the Hopewell Box" and "Read All About It: The Corporate Takeover of America's Newspapers."
The sea is around us, T.S. Eliot wrote, but the river is in us. Flowing through Eliot's mind was the majestic Mississippi on whose banks he was born; to him, it was a "strong brown God--sullen, untamed and intractable." Due in no small measure to Eliot, Mark Twain and Oscar Hammerstein, the Mississippi became the river of American consciousness and the river in us all.
BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
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