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John Billingsley

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SPORTS
September 19, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Hammer thrower John Billingsley has been suspended from competition for two years after testing positive for high levels of testosterone during the U.S. Track and Field Championships, The Athletics Congress announced. Billingsley, 25, formerly of Washington State, will be suspended through June 15, 1992.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2004 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
"Bitter Bierce: Or the Friction We Call Grief," a solo show at the Zephyr about the life and career of unjustly neglected literary genius Ambrose Bierce, is a happy marriage of performance and text that leaves us weeping at the church. Call this a love match. A Bottom's Dream production, playing in repertory with "Miss Margarida's Way," the show is reminiscent of "Mark Twain Tonight" -- with acid splashed in its face.
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SPORTS
December 19, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John Billingsley, the 10th-ranked hammer thrower in the United States in 1989, has been banned from competition for life, USA Track & Field announced. Billingsley, 26, of Placentia, was suspended for two years in June of 1991, after testing positive for high levels of testosterone. He would have been eligible to return to competition June 16, 1993, provided he passed further drug tests.
SPORTS
December 19, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John Billingsley, the 10th-ranked hammer thrower in the United States in 1989, has been banned from competition for life, USA Track & Field announced. Billingsley, 26, of Placentia, was suspended for two years in June of 1991, after testing positive for high levels of testosterone. He would have been eligible to return to competition June 16, 1993, provided he passed further drug tests.
NEWS
October 4, 1986 | Associated Press
A 14-year-old boy was charged with involuntary manslaughter and serious assault Friday for allegedly delivering a blow that dislodged a plastic heart valve, causing the death of a 13-year-old classmate. Jasper County Atty. John Billingsley said the boy, Jody Collins of Newton, had gotten into a hallway scuffle with Justin Charles Cupples at Berg Junior High School on Sept. 24. Court documents said Cupples was hit once in the chest and once in the back.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2004 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
"Bitter Bierce: Or the Friction We Call Grief," a solo show at the Zephyr about the life and career of unjustly neglected literary genius Ambrose Bierce, is a happy marriage of performance and text that leaves us weeping at the church. Call this a love match. A Bottom's Dream production, playing in repertory with "Miss Margarida's Way," the show is reminiscent of "Mark Twain Tonight" -- with acid splashed in its face.
NEWS
August 12, 2004 | Kathleen Foley
Bitter Bierce: Or the Friction We Call Grief: A solo show at the Zephyr about the life and career of overlooked literary genius Ambrose Bierce, this is a happy marriage of performance and text that leaves us weeping at the church. Call this a love match. The show is reminiscent of "Mark Twain Tonight" -- with acid splashed in its face.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Playwrights who mix disparate characters from history and legend in fanciful settings often become too amused by their own erudite jokes and neglect the audience's needs for coherence, connection--and footnotes. Such is the case with Jeffrey Dorchen's "Ugly's First World," at the Actors' Gang's El Centro space. The title character is a zombie, fresh out of hell, along with two comrades, Cruel and Stupid. Ugly soon learns that no one is very happy in heaven or on Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1997 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Talk about enjoying your work. In his gleefully nasty portrayal of the eponymous villain in Shakespeare's "King Richard III" at A Noise Within, company stalwart Geoff Elliott makes it clear that this is one Richard who gets a huge charge out of his own misdeeds.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
How many Klingons does it take to screw in a lightbulb? Never mind. All you need to know is there's a new Enterprise in prime time, this one going boldly where other TV starshippers have gone many times before. The newcomer arrives in a UPN series succeeding its "Star Trek: Voyager," which came after "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine," which followed "Star Trek: The Next Generation," which was spun from Gene Roddenberry's "Star Trek."
SPORTS
September 19, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Hammer thrower John Billingsley has been suspended from competition for two years after testing positive for high levels of testosterone during the U.S. Track and Field Championships, The Athletics Congress announced. Billingsley, 25, formerly of Washington State, will be suspended through June 15, 1992.
NEWS
October 4, 1986 | Associated Press
A 14-year-old boy was charged with involuntary manslaughter and serious assault Friday for allegedly delivering a blow that dislodged a plastic heart valve, causing the death of a 13-year-old classmate. Jasper County Atty. John Billingsley said the boy, Jody Collins of Newton, had gotten into a hallway scuffle with Justin Charles Cupples at Berg Junior High School on Sept. 24. Court documents said Cupples was hit once in the chest and once in the back.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Mamet Matters," declares the title of this double bill of one-acts at the Hudson Theatre. Yet these sprightly little plays are not what most people have in mind when they think of David Mamet's work. "Bobby Gould in Hell" and "The Frog Prince" are excursions into fantasy, with a light touch that's more rewarding than the heavier hand Mamet sometimes wields. Neither play is new, but the production company (Broken Leg Productions) is, and it does full justice to Mamet's creations.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2012 | By Charlotte Stoudt
One percenters, hide those offshore accounts: Occupy LA - or something a lot like it - has been spotted at the Boston Court Performing Arts Center.  The corruption of the privileged few is the comic target of Nikolai Gogol's “The Government Inspector,” now in an exuberant if overstated new adaptation by Oded Gross. We open on a scene that sounds suspiciously like a city council meeting in Bell: Mayor Anton (John Billingsley) alerts his cronies (Joe Fria, Alan Brooks, and Dana Kelly, Jr.)
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