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John Bohn

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BUSINESS
May 3, 2005 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed the former head of Moody's Investors Service to the state's Public Utilities Commission on Monday, filling the final vacancy on the powerful regulatory body. John Bohn, 67, who also worked in the Reagan administration's Treasury Department and now runs a consulting firm, is expected to be sworn in by Thursday.
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BUSINESS
May 3, 2005 | Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed the former head of Moody's Investors Service to the state's Public Utilities Commission on Monday, filling the final vacancy on the powerful regulatory body. John Bohn, 67, who also worked in the Reagan administration's Treasury Department and now runs a consulting firm, is expected to be sworn in by Thursday.
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BUSINESS
February 19, 1986
The White House announced that President Reagan intends to nominate John A. Bohn Jr. to a four-year term as president of the Export-Import Bank. Bohn, 48, has been first vice president and chairman of the board of the bank since 1984.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1990
A 96-unit Marina del Rey condominium development has received the go-ahead from the Los Angeles Planning Commission, overcoming objections from a neighboring property owner that construction might disturb underground toxics nearby. The project by developers Paul Plotkin and Jeff Rosen is planned for a lot at the corner of Glencoe and Maxella avenues, across from the movie theaters in the Marina Marketplace shopping center.
NEWS
June 7, 1990
A 96-unit Marina del Rey condominium development got the go-ahead last week from the Los Angeles Planning Commission, overcoming objections from a neighboring property owner that construction might disturb underground toxic contamination on a nearby lot. The project by developers Paul Plotkin and Jeff Rosen is planned for a vacant lot at the corner of Glencoe and Maxella avenues, across the street from the movie theaters in the Marina Marketplace shopping center.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2005 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Almonds are just almonds. That was the decision Thursday by the California Public Utilities Commission when it ordered PG&E Corp.'s Pacific Gas & Electric Co. to sell power to almond hullers and shellers at a discounted agricultural rate. The utility has been charging the industry a higher commercial rate, arguing that the process of freeing the nut is a manufacturing technology that changes the form of the almond.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1988 | From Reuters
As revitalized U.S. exports continue to grow stronger, the Export-Import Bank is concerned that America's trading partners may increasingly seek ways to offset the dollar-value advantage. A sharp reduction in the value of the dollar has made U.S. products much more attractive overseas while making foreign goods more expensive in the American market.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2005 | James S. Granelli and Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writers
Few who deal with the state Public Utilities Commission expect the agency to veer substantially from its recent pro-business course after the departure of hard-driving Susan Kennedy, named Wednesday as Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's chief of staff. But many figure the agency will become more collegial and, possibly, more effective as it tries to balance the interests of consumers against those of power and phone companies.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | Associated Press
The Export-Import Bank will seek a $3-billion bailout from Congress next month to counter the loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in capital, the federal agency's president said in a report published today. John A. Bohn Jr. told the New York Times that he will report to Congress next month that the bank's capital has fallen below $1.4 billion, half its 1983 level, and will be wiped out within nine months. The bank helps finance U.S. exports.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2008 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
The cost of flicking on the lights is about to get cheaper for customers of Southern California Edison. Electricity rates will go down for Edison customers by about 1.5% this year as the utility returns about $430 million it over-collected from ratepayers in 2007. The give-back stems from an annual reconciliation of utility rate proceeds and costs and reflects lower-than-expected prices for natural gas and power purchases in 2007. Under the rates approved Thursday by the California Public Utilities Commission, the average residential bill will be about $1 lower per month, beginning April 2 and continuing for the following 12 months, said Akbar Jazayeri, Edison's vice president of regulatory operations.
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