Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Bolton
IN THE NEWS

John Bolton

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Slowly but surely, Mitt Romney is shoring up his right flank. His campaign announced Thursday that he's been endorsed by John Bolton, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President George W. Bush. Bolton, whose outspoken views on national security earned him fans among conservatives and critics elsewhere, briefly flirted with a presidential bid of his own. He also became strongly identified with the tea party movement as it rose to prominence in 2009 and 2010.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 15, 2013
Re "Ukraine's drama, Obama's weakness," Opinion, Dec. 12 John Bolton, a former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, has some knowledge and perspective on foreign affairs. But his argument that events in Ukraine are important to the West would be more persuasive if he could refrain from bashing President Obama. Whether Ukraine and Georgia remain in the Russian sphere of influence or perhaps join the European Union may be very important to the citizens of those countries. The economic stakes would be quite high.
Advertisement
OPINION
December 15, 2007
Re "Bolton calls report on Iran 'quasi-putsch,' " Dec. 9 John Bolton has proved, once again, his unfitness to hold high office by calling the intelligence community's recent report on the Iranian nuclear policy a "quasi-putsch." The report was the result of an extremely thorough investigation that reflects the consensus of all 16 intelligence agencies. Bolton is simply using what psychologists call "projection," where someone projects his own intentions onto others.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid asserted his determination to end the use of the filibuster to block presidential appointments Monday, saying the change was needed to “save the Senate from becoming obsolete.” “This is really a moment in history when circumstances dictate the need for change,” the Nevada Democrat said in a morning speech at the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank. “All we want to do is what the Constitution says we should do. Filibusters are not part of the Constitution.” Reid's remarks represented a further escalation in his rhetoric in the dispute with the Senate's Republican minority over procedural maneuvers that have left a number of President Obama's choices to executive branch postings unconfirmed nearly a half year into his second term.
NATIONAL
November 10, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
John R. Bolton's prospects for remaining the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations dwindled Thursday as Democrats and a key Republican senator rejected efforts to have the still-Republican- controlled Senate confirm his nomination. The White House continued to explore ways to keep Bolton at the U.N. without going through a confirmation process. Outgoing Sen. Lincoln Chafee (R-R.I.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2005 | Paul Richter and Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writers
A former U.S. ambassador to South Korea said Thursday that John R. Bolton, President Bush's choice for U.N. ambassador, might have misled the Senate Foreign Relations Committee about a provocative and controversial 2003 speech on North Korea. The former ambassador, Thomas Hubbard, also described Bolton yelling and slamming down a telephone on him during a confrontation. It was the latest example of the allegedly confrontational behavior that had helped stall Bolton's nomination.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2005 | Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writer
John R. Bolton, emerging as the most controversial of President Bush's second-term nominees, battled charges by Democratic senators Monday that he had bullied intelligence analysts who disagreed with him and was unfit to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. During a tense daylong hearing on his confirmation, Democrats painted Bolton as too ideologically hostile to the U.N., undiplomatic and too compromised by his handling of intelligence to be entrusted with America's top U.N. job. "The U.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Democrats are likely to vote unanimously against John R. Bolton when his nomination to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations comes before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee next week, according to Democratic and Republican lawmakers and aides. It would be the first time that committee Democrats unanimously opposed a Bush diplomatic selection, and it could put the nomination in peril if any Republicans defected to vote against Bolton.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2005 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
The maverick tendencies of Republican Sen. George V. Voinovich are no secret. The former Ohio governor and Cleveland mayor has challenged President Bush and party leaders on numerous issues. But Tuesday, when Voinovich held up Bush's nomination of John R. Bolton as United Nations ambassador, even his Capitol Hill colleagues were stunned. "I've heard enough today that I don't feel comfortable about voting for Mr.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2005 | Mary Curtius and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee warned Thursday that they may not be prepared to vote on John R. Bolton's nomination as U.N. ambassador next week, as they previously agreed to do. Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, the committee's ranking Democrat, asked for additional documents as part of the panel's investigation of Bolton, and indicated that Democrats might try again to delay Thursday's vote if the information is withheld.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Paul Richter
The State Department slammed former United Nations envoy John Bolton over his suggestion that Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton falsely claimed a concussion to avoid a potentially embarrassing appearance before Congress to explain the deadly terrorist attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya. In an appearance on Fox News, Bolton said that Clinton's claim that she had fainted because of the flu, hitting her head and suffering a concussion, was what foreign service officers call a “diplomatic illness,” intended to free a diplomat from an unpleasant duty.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Slowly but surely, Mitt Romney is shoring up his right flank. His campaign announced Thursday that he's been endorsed by John Bolton, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations under President George W. Bush. Bolton, whose outspoken views on national security earned him fans among conservatives and critics elsewhere, briefly flirted with a presidential bid of his own. He also became strongly identified with the tea party movement as it rose to prominence in 2009 and 2010.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli and James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
  Republican presidential contenders took a brief respite from canvassing early battleground states Wednesday to come here to court Jewish activists and donors, with Newt Gingrich reveling in his newfound status as a front-runner and Rick Perry trying to clarify his stance on aid to Israel. Gingrich was bathed in applause from the crowd at a forum hosted by the Republican Jewish Coalition. In the morning, he spoke at a gathering of conservative activists in Virginia before appearing at the forum, where he, like the five other candidates in attendance, denounced the Obama administration's Middle East policy.
OPINION
October 22, 2009
Re "Ditherer in chief," Opinion, Oct. 18 It took President George W. Bush a number of years to put us in the difficult global position we now face. And, of course, as with so many others, John Bolton wants to conveniently blame this entire mess on President Obama by disingenuously asserting that by now the president should have all of his global chess pieces in place. By his logic, Bolton seems to think that the president, in less than one year in office, should fully understand all of the nuances of each world leader he deals with, and in turn, they should acquiesce to any pressure he should want to exert.
OPINION
December 15, 2007
Re "Bolton calls report on Iran 'quasi-putsch,' " Dec. 9 John Bolton has proved, once again, his unfitness to hold high office by calling the intelligence community's recent report on the Iranian nuclear policy a "quasi-putsch." The report was the result of an extremely thorough investigation that reflects the consensus of all 16 intelligence agencies. Bolton is simply using what psychologists call "projection," where someone projects his own intentions onto others.
WORLD
December 9, 2007 | From Reuters
U.S. intelligence services attempted to influence political policy by releasing their assessment that concludes Iran halted its nuclear arms program in 2003, said John Bolton, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Der Spiegel magazine quoted Bolton on Saturday as alleging that the aim of the National Intelligence Estimate, which contradicts his and President Bush's position, was not to provide the latest intelligence on Iran.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2005 | Paul Richter and Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writers
Republicans were bracing Wednesday for a "barrage" of new allegations against John R. Bolton, President Bush's choice for U.N. ambassador, as Democrats planned to expand an investigation of the controversial nominee. After a Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation vote was unexpectedly delayed Tuesday, surprised and angry White House officials accused Democrats of exaggerating and making unproven allegations as part of an "ugly" partisan effort to derail the nominee.
WORLD
March 8, 2005 | Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Monday nominated State Department official John R. Bolton to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, selecting an administration loyalist who has disparaged the world body and clashed with allies over Iran and North Korea policy. Bolton's approval seems assured by the Republican majority in the Senate. But with congressional Democrats ex- pressing dismay over his selection, the confirmation hearing may be rancorous.
WORLD
December 5, 2006 | Maggie Farley and James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writers
John R. Bolton, the pugnacious U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, is known for not giving up. But after meeting with his mentor Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday to discuss ways to stay at the U.N. without a Senate confirmation, he decided it was time to quit.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|