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John Bonadelle

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February 21, 1998 | MARK ARAX and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The developer who built much of Fresno and Madera counties over the last half-century, whose power has been felt by successive generations of local and state politicians, was indicted Friday on wide-ranging charges that he attempted to corruptly influence public officials to secure approval for housing tracts. John Bonadelle, 80, was charged along with two former Fresno councilmen, one of whom served as Bonadelle's personal lobbyist for the past two decades.
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NEWS
May 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
A prominent developer and a lobbyist have pleaded guilty in a wide-ranging political corruption probe that has snagged more than a dozen politicians and developers. Developer John Bonadelle, 81, and James Logan, 74, were indicted more than a year ago on a range of racketeering, bribery, mail fraud and witness tampering charges. On Tuesday, a week before trial, Bonadelle pleaded guilty to one felony count of mail fraud, and Logan pleaded guilty to a single felony count of witness tampering.
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NEWS
May 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
A prominent developer and a lobbyist have pleaded guilty in a wide-ranging political corruption probe that has snagged more than a dozen politicians and developers. Developer John Bonadelle, 81, and James Logan, 74, were indicted more than a year ago on a range of racketeering, bribery, mail fraud and witness tampering charges. On Tuesday, a week before trial, Bonadelle pleaded guilty to one felony count of mail fraud, and Logan pleaded guilty to a single felony count of witness tampering.
NEWS
February 21, 1998 | MARK ARAX and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The developer who built much of Fresno and Madera counties over the last half-century, whose power has been felt by successive generations of local and state politicians, was indicted Friday on wide-ranging charges that he attempted to corruptly influence public officials to secure approval for housing tracts. John Bonadelle, 80, was charged along with two former Fresno councilmen, one of whom served as Bonadelle's personal lobbyist for the past two decades.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this agricultural heartland of California, an endless valley of boom towns, the words "slow growth" are spoken in the whisper of someone confessing heresy. Behind closed doors, city and Fresno County elected officials concede an unspoken fact of life here: The tract houses swallowing up 20 square miles of prime farmland each year are economic losers, lining the pockets of a few developers and slowly draining city coffers. But when it comes to voting down the projects in public, critics gripe, these same elected officials turn pussycat.
FOOD
July 22, 1998 | DAVID KARP
"Royal yaks for sale," reads the sign a few miles north of downtown Fresno on California 99. Could there really be a herd of the shaggy, long-horned Tibetan bovines in the sweltering flatlands of the Central Valley? It's possible. Around the country, rare-breed enthusiasts raise the creatures for yak cashmere and yakburgers (like ostrich and emu, they're supposed to be lower in cholesterol than beef).
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of the successes that rose from the Dust Bowl migration here, none has been more stunning than that of the Tatham family, horse traders extraordinaire who parlayed a few nursing homes into a $200 million fortune in real estate and farm holdings. Their journey from Oklahoma poverty to Fresno riches was recently captured in a major book, "Rising in the West," the story of an Okie family from the Great Depression through the Ronald Reagan years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2005 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
The Millerton New Town -- more than 3,000 houses rising in the foothills above Fresno -- was all set for approval when it quietly disappeared from the agenda of the Board of Supervisors a few weeks ago. At the last minute, the builder decided not to seek the board's go-ahead after it was revealed that the entire development was based on a supply of federal water that didn't exist, at least not legally. But no one here -- not the developer or the county or the U.S.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FBI Agent Jim Wedick was in his Sacramento office trying to close the books on the biggest political corruption case of his career--a sting that netted four crooked state senators and 10 other public officials--when the call came in from Fresno County. A city councilman allegedly was shaking down a developer on a rezoning vote. The angry developer had captured the $10,000 deal on a hidden tape recorder.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this agricultural heartland of California, an endless valley of boom towns, the words "slow growth" are spoken in the whisper of someone confessing heresy. Behind closed doors, city and Fresno County elected officials concede an unspoken fact of life here: The tract houses swallowing up 20 square miles of prime farmland each year are economic losers, lining the pockets of a few developers and slowly draining city coffers. But when it comes to voting down the projects in public, critics gripe, these same elected officials turn pussycat.
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