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John Boorman

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2001 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's a ruthless spy and a pathological liar to do in a post-Cold War world where none of the old rules apply and everything's up for grabs? Why, team up and turn the espionage game into the ultimate con and walk away with a fortune, of course. At least that's what Pierce Brosnan and Geoffrey Rush try to do in "The Tailor of Panama," the John Boorman film that opened last weekend to strong business in limited release ($1.8 million on 199 screens).
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
In "Black Rock," a female-fueled thriller, Sarah (Kate Bosworth) wants to make amends with two childhood friends by pitching a tent with them on a small Maine island where the three women once camped as kids. "We are all dying," Sarah tells Lou (Lake Bell) and Abby (Katie Aselton), and she's right: Life is short, and it's about to get shorter. After a trio of dishonorably discharged vets crashes the women's campfire and a drunken hookup goes deathly awry, it's girls-versus-boys to see which gender will survive.
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NEWS
December 3, 1992 | GEOFF BOUCHER
"Zardoz" (1974), directed by John Boorman. 105 minutes. Rated R. For wild science fiction fans, this is a trippy examination of what happens when intellect overpowers humanity and humans taste immortality. For the less philosophical, it's a unique chance to see a bare-chested Sean Connery run around as a gun-toting savage with a ponytail.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Taylor Hackford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Donald E. Westlake's greatest literary creation, Parker, was first played on-screen by Lee Marvin in "Point Blank" (1967). Marvin's collaboration with first-time feature director John Boorman was wonderfully fertile, giving birth to some indelible cinematic moments. Boorman encouraged Marvin to remain so silent, to suppress his intentions so deeply, that costar Angie Dickinson became totally frustrated in their scenes. Finally, Boorman encouraged Dickinson to unleash her anger by physically attacking Marvin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988 | Leonard Klady \f7
Oscar-nominated film maker John Boorman (for "Hope and Glory") tells us he and another nominee--actor Marcello Mastroianni (for "Dark Eyes")--may soon be "swinging" into action on a new film. The two men, who worked together on 1970's "Leo the Last," dined in Rome recently, where the actor suggested an ideal subject for collaboration--Tarzan. Boorman said Mastroianni would play the king of the apes in his 60s and no longer quite the dashing figure he once was. "I like the idea," said Boorman.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | GEOFF BOUCHER
With a cheesy title such as "Zardoz" and an opening monologue by a floating, disembodied head sporting an Egyptian headdress and a penciled-on mustache, it is easy to understand why John Boorman's 1974 fantasy film might grow dusty on video store shelves. But for fans of wild science fiction, the film is a trippy examination of what happens when intellect overpowers humanity and humans taste immortality.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | SUSAN KING
Here are the paintings upon which the Showtime "Picture Windows" episodes are based and their film masters. Each evening's trilogy begins at 8. Oct. 1 Soir Bleu: Based on the 1914 painting by Edward Hopper and directed by Norman Jewison. Alan Arkin, Dan Hedaya and Rosana DeSota star. Song of Songs: Inspired by Sandro Botticelli's "La Primavera" and directed by Peter Bogdanovich. George Segal, Sally Kirkland and Brooke Adams star.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
The quality of John Boorman's autobiographical "Hope and Glory" comes from its perspective. Unlike most films that take a backward look at World War II, this one replaces the sad-cynical perspective of adults with the awe-struck recollections of youth--a London kid (fashioned in the image of Boorman himself) enjoying the air raids and bomb-pocked streets of his neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
In "Black Rock," a female-fueled thriller, Sarah (Kate Bosworth) wants to make amends with two childhood friends by pitching a tent with them on a small Maine island where the three women once camped as kids. "We are all dying," Sarah tells Lou (Lake Bell) and Abby (Katie Aselton), and she's right: Life is short, and it's about to get shorter. After a trio of dishonorably discharged vets crashes the women's campfire and a drunken hookup goes deathly awry, it's girls-versus-boys to see which gender will survive.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I don't know exactly when Liam Neeson turned into Hollywood's favorite vengeance machine - the go-to guy for settling scores - but he has definitely arrived with an emotionally gripping performance in the current box-office hit "The Grey. " Surely "Taken" in 2009 , with his ex-CIA operative in a relentless and ruthless bid to find his kidnapped daughter, signaled that he had made the A-team. And in 2010, he would actually join a re-imagined "A-Team" as its tactical leader, Hannibal, with all the historic resonance that name implies.
NEWS
June 7, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE American Cinematheque is going European -- at least for one week. The showcase "EuroCinema: New Films From Europe" begins this evening at the Egyptian Theatre with the Los Angeles premiere of John Boorman's newest film. "The Tiger's Tail" is an Irish black comedy thriller starring frequent Boorman collaborator Brendan Gleeson as a property owner from humble origins who is now overextended and on the verge of a nervous breakdown until he comes across his doppelganger.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Call it kismet, fate or a clever marketing tool that led to the DVD debuts today of British director John Boorman's first American film and his latest feature. A former documentary filmmaker, Boorman made the leap to features in 1965 with the well-received musical "Having a Wild Weekend" (it was known as "Catch Me if You Can" in England), which starred the popular British pop group the Dave Clark Five.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"In My Country" is the kind of serious, intelligent probing of the work of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, set up by the government in 1996 to investigate human rights abuses under apartheid, that one would expect from a director of the caliber of John Boorman. He has confronted the horrors straight on but has been stymied by a ponderous script adapted by Ann Peacock from the book "Country of My Skull" by Afrikaans poet Antjie Krog.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Making "In My Country" two years ago in South Africa was an emotionally draining experience for veteran director John Boorman. The drama, which opens today, is set against the backdrop of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings that took place in the country from 1996 to 1998 to investigate human rights abuses under apartheid.
BOOKS
November 9, 2003 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel reviews movies for Time and is the author of "Woody Allen: A Life in Film." His latest documentary picture is "Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin."
"MEMORY is definition of life," director John Boorman writes in his gracefully composed and haunting autobiography. Yet memory of the kind he is talking about -- highly personal and delicately shaded -- is a subject mostly excluded from movies. It does not directly inform them the way it does so many, perhaps most, seriously intended novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2001 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's a ruthless spy and a pathological liar to do in a post-Cold War world where none of the old rules apply and everything's up for grabs? Why, team up and turn the espionage game into the ultimate con and walk away with a fortune, of course. At least that's what Pierce Brosnan and Geoffrey Rush try to do in "The Tailor of Panama," the John Boorman film that opened last weekend to strong business in limited release ($1.8 million on 199 screens).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Entertainments" is the way celebrated British novelist Graham Greene described his clever, sophisticated diversions such as "The Third Man" and "Our Man in Havana," and John Boorman's spiffy film version of spymaster John le Carre's "The Tailor of Panama" is very much in that satisfying but often ignored tradition.
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