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John Borunda

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March 7, 2001 | ADAM BREGMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With no money, resume or skills to speak of, in 1993 I decided to run for mayor of L.A. hoping to sneak some relatively radical ideas into public discussion. I was 22 and had passed on college in favor of traveling and writing and publishing my own zine, while working various dead-end, minimum-wage jobs. I felt qualified to run for mayor because I had been spending much of my time wandering around L.A. documenting the city for my zine, following local politics and being overly opinionated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this, the "Year of School Reform," when top candidates in the Los Angeles mayoral race talk often and loudly of the need to improve public education, such an oversight could never happen, right? It could, and it did. On Saturday, about 150 of Southern California's brightest and most politically active high school students hosted a mayoral candidates forum--and only one of the front-runners showed up, arriving 90 minutes late.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A politically active young Salvadoran immigrant woman was kidnaped, raped and interrogated in Los Angeles earlier this week in what fellow activists charge may be the first Salvadoran death squad-style abduction in the United States. Police confirmed that the woman had been kidnaped and raped, but declined comment on political aspects of the incident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first weeks, the race for mayor of Los Angeles often resembled a gang attack on City Councilman Michael Woo, the leader in early polls. But in a pair of debates this week, the campaign escalated into a barroom brawl, as a number of top candidates began throwing verbal punches at each other. Woo took shots at Assemblyman Richard Katz. Katz called Woo a liar. City Councilman Nate Holden attacked multimillionaire lawyer Richard Riordan, as did Councilman Joel Wachs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
Rep. Maxine Waters played a dirty trick on the mayoral candidates by inviting them to appear at her forum Saturday--and then sharing the stage with them. It was as if Katharine Hepburn in her prime had appeared with a bunch of featured players from the soaps. The candidates didn't have a chance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | GEORGE RAMOS
When the L.A. metro chapter of the Mexican-American Political Assn. handed out its endorsement for mayor Saturday evening, the reactions were understandable. Mike Woo's supporters let out a holler when he won the group's nod. Julian Nava politely declined to talk about it afterward. John Borunda, Frank Teran, Oscar Valdes, Leonard Shapiro and Ted Hayes--who aren't as well known as Woo and other officeholders in the race--said they weren't discouraged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1993
The Los Angeles city clerk's office has announced that the following candidates will be on the April 20 election ballot. Of the original 119 who filed to run for 17 offices, 95 qualified. Candidates' descriptions are their own. MAYOR Michael A. Leptuch; none stated Nick Patsaouras; businessman, transportation commissioner Philip R.
NEWS
April 11, 1993
They are the minor candidates, the Rodney Dangerfields of the mayoral election. Among them are a doctor, a retired policeman, a homeless activist and a singer-dancer who for years did her performing on a downtown street corner. Running on shoestring budgets against 11 better-known, better-funded candidates, they often feel that they get no respect. And some of them do not, although a number have serious messages and are using the mayoral campaign as a forum in which to express themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1993 | RICHARD SIMON and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a legally controversial boost to Michael Woo's campaign for mayor of Los Angeles, the Democratic National Committee has weighed in with more than $100,000 for mailers supporting the councilman, campaign spending records show. The action came just days after a state judge, citing a California constitutional ban on political party spending in nonpartisan municipal campaigns, blocked a promised $200,000 in expenditures for Woo by the state Democratic Party.
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