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John Boswell

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BOOKS
December 14, 1986 | Shelly Lowenkopf
THE AWFUL TRUTH ABOUT PUBLISHING: WHY THEY ALWAYS REJECT YOUR MANUSCRIPT AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT by John Boswell (Warner: $14.95; 161 pp.). A literary agent, book packager and part-time writer, John Boswell has sought to provide a quick fix on the American book trade, nudging and winking his way through common misconceptions beginning authors have about publishers' decisions to publish and their subsequent decisions relating to distribution, promotion and advertising.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 29, 2012
Re "The next worst thing," Opinion, July 26 Michael Kinsley stated that gay marriage "seemed at first to be a bizarre idea" but "has become utterly conventional. " Christian gay marriage was "utterly conventional" in pre-modern Europe. The Times' 1994 review of the late Yale history professor John Boswell's book, "Same-sex Unions in Pre-modern Europe," called it "striking … profound and exciting. " On the book's back cover, just under a quote from that review, it states, "One of our most respected authorities on the Middle Ages produces extensive evidence that at one time the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches not only sanctioned unions between partners of the same sex but sanctified them - in ceremonies that bear striking resemblance to heterosexual marriage ceremonies.
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NEWS
June 17, 1994
We found the Los Angeles Times' note accompanying Garry Trudeau's "Doonesbury" last week (which concerned John Boswell's book, "Same Sex Unions in Premodern Europe") to be highly misleading in implying that the same-sex union ceremony uncovered by Professor Boswell was primarily a phenomenon of the Eastern Orthodox Church. In the early Christian era, there was no clear division between the Eastern and Roman branches of the Christian Church. Professor Boswell shows that the same-sex ceremony was practiced throughout Europe and, in fact, he found the largest number of early manuscript copies in Italy--with no less than eight copies in the Vatican itself.
OPINION
July 29, 2012
Re "The next worst thing," Opinion, July 26 Michael Kinsley stated that gay marriage "seemed at first to be a bizarre idea" but "has become utterly conventional. " Christian gay marriage was "utterly conventional" in pre-modern Europe. The Times' 1994 review of the late Yale history professor John Boswell's book, "Same-sex Unions in Pre-modern Europe," called it "striking … profound and exciting. " On the book's back cover, just under a quote from that review, it states, "One of our most respected authorities on the Middle Ages produces extensive evidence that at one time the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches not only sanctioned unions between partners of the same sex but sanctified them - in ceremonies that bear striking resemblance to heterosexual marriage ceremonies.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | Times Wire Services
John E. Boswell, a Yale historian who provoked debate with his research saying gay marriages during the Middle Ages were celebrated in the church, died Friday of the complications of AIDS. He was 47. Boswell drew national attention in June with his book "Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe," a study of more than 60 manuscripts from the Middle Ages. Boswell contended that homosexual marriages were well established in the medieval church. But Boswell's thesis was criticized by other scholars.
BOOKS
July 2, 1989 | Robert Maniquis, Maniquis is the director of "1789-1989, The French Revolution: A UCLA Bicentennial Program."
Garbage bins are where people today sometimes leave their babies. We have all heard such stories and we all wonder at such barbarity. But do street smarts, especially of the poor, suggest that the garbage heap is where unwanted babies are most likely to be found? Are people who abandon their children in this way both callous and kind? Attitudes toward children, as John Boswell shows, always have been contradictory.
BOOKS
July 31, 1994 | Wendy Doniger, Wendy Doniger is the Mircea Eliade professor of the history of religions at the University of Chicago and the author of "Women, Androgynes, and Other Mythical Beasts" (University of Chicago Press)
John Boswell's "Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe" broaches two crucial issues: the subjectivity of translation--in this case, what do other people mean when they speak of love or marriage? And the relevance of history--of what use is the past to us? Boswell approaches these questions in a particularly striking and controversial form--more vividly than a historian investigating, say, slavery or usury in the ancient world--because he is speaking of sex. Sexuality in general, and sexuality between people of the same sex in particular, has always been characterized by tremendous privacy, subjectivity, circumlocution and, often, concealment.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1994
Although "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau refers to the Catholic church as blessing same-sex unions, most, but not all, of the claims of such unions point to rituals and practices of Catholics who later came to be identified with the Eastern Orthodox Church. Church spokesmen dispute the claims made in a book by Yale University professor John Boswell.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | Times Wire Services
John E. Boswell, a Yale historian who provoked debate with his research saying gay marriages during the Middle Ages were celebrated in the church, died Friday of the complications of AIDS. He was 47. Boswell drew national attention in June with his book "Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe," a study of more than 60 manuscripts from the Middle Ages. Boswell contended that homosexual marriages were well established in the medieval church. But Boswell's thesis was criticized by other scholars.
BOOKS
July 31, 1994 | Wendy Doniger, Wendy Doniger is the Mircea Eliade professor of the history of religions at the University of Chicago and the author of "Women, Androgynes, and Other Mythical Beasts" (University of Chicago Press)
John Boswell's "Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe" broaches two crucial issues: the subjectivity of translation--in this case, what do other people mean when they speak of love or marriage? And the relevance of history--of what use is the past to us? Boswell approaches these questions in a particularly striking and controversial form--more vividly than a historian investigating, say, slavery or usury in the ancient world--because he is speaking of sex. Sexuality in general, and sexuality between people of the same sex in particular, has always been characterized by tremendous privacy, subjectivity, circumlocution and, often, concealment.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
We found the Los Angeles Times' note accompanying Garry Trudeau's "Doonesbury" last week (which concerned John Boswell's book, "Same Sex Unions in Premodern Europe") to be highly misleading in implying that the same-sex union ceremony uncovered by Professor Boswell was primarily a phenomenon of the Eastern Orthodox Church. In the early Christian era, there was no clear division between the Eastern and Roman branches of the Christian Church. Professor Boswell shows that the same-sex ceremony was practiced throughout Europe and, in fact, he found the largest number of early manuscript copies in Italy--with no less than eight copies in the Vatican itself.
BOOKS
July 2, 1989 | Robert Maniquis, Maniquis is the director of "1789-1989, The French Revolution: A UCLA Bicentennial Program."
Garbage bins are where people today sometimes leave their babies. We have all heard such stories and we all wonder at such barbarity. But do street smarts, especially of the poor, suggest that the garbage heap is where unwanted babies are most likely to be found? Are people who abandon their children in this way both callous and kind? Attitudes toward children, as John Boswell shows, always have been contradictory.
BOOKS
December 14, 1986 | Shelly Lowenkopf
THE AWFUL TRUTH ABOUT PUBLISHING: WHY THEY ALWAYS REJECT YOUR MANUSCRIPT AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT by John Boswell (Warner: $14.95; 161 pp.). A literary agent, book packager and part-time writer, John Boswell has sought to provide a quick fix on the American book trade, nudging and winking his way through common misconceptions beginning authors have about publishers' decisions to publish and their subsequent decisions relating to distribution, promotion and advertising.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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