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John Brademas

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OPINION
July 5, 1998 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is director of the JSM+ New Media Lab. Dr. John Brademas spoke with him from London, where the former congressman and Rhodes scholar was attending a series of lectures at Oxford University
Late last month, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a near-unanimous ruling that seemed to end a bitter chapter in the collision of art and politics. In upholding a 1990 law requiring the National Endowment for the Arts to apply a "general standard of decency and respect" when making grants, the court handed a victory to conservatives. Led by North Carolina Republican Sen. Jesse Helms, the conservatives were outraged by NEA grants to artists whose work they found obscene.
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OPINION
July 5, 1998 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt, a contributing editor to Opinion, is director of the JSM+ New Media Lab. Dr. John Brademas spoke with him from London, where the former congressman and Rhodes scholar was attending a series of lectures at Oxford University
Late last month, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a near-unanimous ruling that seemed to end a bitter chapter in the collision of art and politics. In upholding a 1990 law requiring the National Endowment for the Arts to apply a "general standard of decency and respect" when making grants, the court handed a victory to conservatives. Led by North Carolina Republican Sen. Jesse Helms, the conservatives were outraged by NEA grants to artists whose work they found obscene.
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NEWS
December 8, 1988
New York University president John Brademas received the 1988 Axios Man of the Year Award at a ceremony held recently at the Beverly Hilton. Axios, now celebrating its 10th anniversary, is a charitable organization of Southern California Greek-American business and professional leaders. It provides scholarships and is active in community programs. Brademas, who served in Congress for 22 years before becoming president of NYU in 1980, was the first American of Greek origin elected to the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Endowment for the Arts reforms--ranging from altering grant-review panels to assuring that the NEA chairman is exposed to "salvos" but not "potshots" from critics--were proposed Wednesday to a commission searching for a consensus to save the federal agency. The proposals by a panel of arts policy experts are expected to be the final testimony before the Independent Commission prepares its report to Congress. The 12-member body has until approximately Sept.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Former U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright was honored today with the Athinai prize, the main award among the annual Onassis prizes. Fulbright, 84, was cited for establishing this century's largest international fellowship program of academic and cultural exchanges. "In the words of your tutor at Oxford, you are 'responsible for the largest and most significant movement of scholars across the face of the Earth since the fall of Constantinople in 1453,' " John Brademas, president of New York University, told the Arkansas Democrat as ministers, diplomats and local dignitaries looked on. Fulbright said he hoped the exchange program he founded more than 40 years ago could play a role in "enhancing mutual understanding" among countries.
NEWS
January 12, 1987
Proposed cuts in federal education spending drew mixed reaction on CBS' "Face the Nation." Sen. Robert T. Stafford (R-Vt.) said the cuts could weaken defense. "Our young people have to have the education to understand how to use the weapons we devise," he said. Budget Director James C. Miller III said President Reagan's proposed fiscal 1988 budget, which would cut federal aid to education by 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Endowment for the Arts reforms--ranging from altering grant-review panels to assuring that the NEA chairman is exposed to "salvos" but not "potshots" from critics--were proposed Wednesday to a commission searching for a consensus to save the federal agency. The proposals by a panel of arts policy experts are expected to be the final testimony before the Independent Commission prepares its report to Congress. The 12-member body has until approximately Sept.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Texaco--the big oil company that in the last two years has endured bankruptcy, a $3-billion lawsuit settlement and sale of about $5 billion worth of its assets--made really important news the other day. At the suggestion of the California Public Employees Retirement System, one of its major shareholders, Texaco appointed a new director to its board--John Brademas, president of New York University and formerly a powerful member of Congress. Why is that news?
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | Associated Press
L. Jay Oliva, a scholar of Russian history and chancellor of New York University, was named Tuesday to succeed John Brademas as the university president. Oliva, 57, will assume the presidency in January, 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Goddard Leaves $20 Million to NYU: The late actress Paulette Goddard left more than $20 million to New York University, it was announced Thursday. University President John Brademas said Goddard's "extraordinary" bequest would benefit the university programs in European studies, public service and the arts. The gift would go toward scholarships, junior faculty development and seven endowed professorships in areas of special interest to Goddard and her late husband, novelist Erich Maria Remarque.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Former U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright was honored today with the Athinai prize, the main award among the annual Onassis prizes. Fulbright, 84, was cited for establishing this century's largest international fellowship program of academic and cultural exchanges. "In the words of your tutor at Oxford, you are 'responsible for the largest and most significant movement of scholars across the face of the Earth since the fall of Constantinople in 1453,' " John Brademas, president of New York University, told the Arkansas Democrat as ministers, diplomats and local dignitaries looked on. Fulbright said he hoped the exchange program he founded more than 40 years ago could play a role in "enhancing mutual understanding" among countries.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Texaco--the big oil company that in the last two years has endured bankruptcy, a $3-billion lawsuit settlement and sale of about $5 billion worth of its assets--made really important news the other day. At the suggestion of the California Public Employees Retirement System, one of its major shareholders, Texaco appointed a new director to its board--John Brademas, president of New York University and formerly a powerful member of Congress. Why is that news?
NEWS
December 8, 1988
New York University president John Brademas received the 1988 Axios Man of the Year Award at a ceremony held recently at the Beverly Hilton. Axios, now celebrating its 10th anniversary, is a charitable organization of Southern California Greek-American business and professional leaders. It provides scholarships and is active in community programs. Brademas, who served in Congress for 22 years before becoming president of NYU in 1980, was the first American of Greek origin elected to the U.S.
NEWS
January 12, 1987
Proposed cuts in federal education spending drew mixed reaction on CBS' "Face the Nation." Sen. Robert T. Stafford (R-Vt.) said the cuts could weaken defense. "Our young people have to have the education to understand how to use the weapons we devise," he said. Budget Director James C. Miller III said President Reagan's proposed fiscal 1988 budget, which would cut federal aid to education by 12.
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | Associated Press
The Onassis Foundation launched a $15-million Center for Hellenic Studies at New York University today, its first major grant to an American educational institution. The funds, NYU President John Brademas said, will be used to buy, renovate and maintain a town house as a home for the Onassis Center; to endow six professorships; for scholarships, fellowships and library materials, and for a cultural program.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Onassis Foundation launched a $15-million Center for Hellenic Studies at New York University on Monday. The funds, university president John Brademas said, will be used to buy, renovate and maintain a townhouse as a home for the Onassis Center; to endow six professorships; for scholarships, fellowships and library materials; and for a cultural program. Athens' Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation was established in the will of Aristotle S.
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