Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Brockman
IN THE NEWS

John Brockman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | LEE DEMBART
Science, after all, is limited. In the areas where it holds sway--physical reality--it has no equal in its ability to understand the world and its power to affect it. But it cannot know everything. Values and morals, for example, elude scientific proof. Where are the limits? How much can science know? Questions along this frontier turn out to be devilishly difficult and so far unresolvable. Is there a complete physical explanation for the experience we call mind?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
March 12, 2006 | K.C. Cole, K.C. Cole is the author of "Mind Over Matter: Conversations With the Cosmos" and a former science writer for The Times.
IT'S hard to know what to make of a book about what scientists believe but cannot prove. Proof, after all, is what scientists do. Proof is what distinguishes science from belief. Of course, proof is not always what it's cracked up to be. As mathematician Keith Devlin points out in "What We Believe but Cannot Prove," a book of essays edited by John Brockman, some of Euclid's proofs turned out centuries later to be incorrect.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | PETER CATALANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems like ages since anyone sat down to write a bare knuckles manifesto challenging our national intelligentsia. Last spring, however, New York literary agent John Brockman fired a fusillade over the bow with a short monograph he calls "The Emerging Third Culture." Brockman's essay says that scientists, not the literary Establishment, are the cream of America's brainpower, the thinkers who make the United States "the intellectual seedbed for Europe and Asia."
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | PETER CATALANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems like ages since anyone sat down to write a bare knuckles manifesto challenging our national intelligentsia. Last spring, however, New York literary agent John Brockman fired a fusillade over the bow with a short monograph he calls "The Emerging Third Culture." Brockman's essay says that scientists, not the literary Establishment, are the cream of America's brainpower, the thinkers who make the United States "the intellectual seedbed for Europe and Asia."
BOOKS
March 12, 2006 | K.C. Cole, K.C. Cole is the author of "Mind Over Matter: Conversations With the Cosmos" and a former science writer for The Times.
IT'S hard to know what to make of a book about what scientists believe but cannot prove. Proof, after all, is what scientists do. Proof is what distinguishes science from belief. Of course, proof is not always what it's cracked up to be. As mathematician Keith Devlin points out in "What We Believe but Cannot Prove," a book of essays edited by John Brockman, some of Euclid's proofs turned out centuries later to be incorrect.
OPINION
December 28, 2006 | STEVE BALLMER; NED SHERMAN; RAFAT ALI; KEVIN WERBACH; CHRIS ANDERSON; HANK BARRY; JOHN BROCKMAN
You'll be back in control STEVE BALLMER Steve Ballmer is the chief executive of Microsoft Corp. RIGHT NOW, I AM as excited by the prospects for technology-driven change as I've ever been. The impact of the Internet, e-mail and mobile phones has been so dramatic that people tend to think the digital revolution has already happened. I think it's just getting started. Many technologies have the potential to catch fire, including Internet television, mobile video devices and even robots.
REAL ESTATE
August 20, 2006 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
When multimillionaire John Brockman decided to build a country estate in 1910, he purchased 40 acres of orchards and 100 acres of mountain land in the Glendale foothills. He patterned his Casa Verdugo -- better known as the Clock Tower House -- after a castle on the Rhine River in his native Germany. According to a Times article from 1914, the palatial home had one of the most unusual garages in the world.
SPORTS
December 18, 1989 | GARR KLUENDER
Rick Majerus, the University of Utah's basketball coach, was understandably nervous before undergoing coronary bypass surgery Thursday. Majerus said he called a friend, Indiana University assistant coach Don Donoher. "I told Don, 'I'm really apprehensive,' " Majerus said. " 'I don't know what I'm getting into. I wonder if Bob (Knight, Indiana's coach) could give me Bo Schembechler's phone number.' At 7 o'clock the next morning, Schembechler was on the phone to me."
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like all enduringly popular children's tales, Frances Hodgson Burnett's "The Secret Garden" communicates a message about human values in the guise of an entertaining story. But where so many of the classics set their lessons against a backdrop of adventure and derring-do, Burnett's 1911 novel deals extensively with loss, wounding and the healing process of the soul. It's a profoundly inward-looking work, which presents all manner of difficulties for a dramatic adaptation.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2004 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
The Brockman Building, a classic downtown Los Angeles office and retail tower, has been purchased for almost $7.5 million by a developer who plans to convert it to condominiums. The 12-story building at 530 W. 7th St. was built in 1912 and served as the backdrop for one of the most famous scenes in movie history: Harold Lloyd perilously dangling from a clock high above the street in the 1923 silent film "Safety Last!" Long Beach-based Urban Pacific Builders and West Millennium Homes Inc.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | LEE DEMBART
Science, after all, is limited. In the areas where it holds sway--physical reality--it has no equal in its ability to understand the world and its power to affect it. But it cannot know everything. Values and morals, for example, elude scientific proof. Where are the limits? How much can science know? Questions along this frontier turn out to be devilishly difficult and so far unresolvable. Is there a complete physical explanation for the experience we call mind?
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | CAROLYN SEE
The three novellas collected in "I Cannot Get You Close Enough" address the common problems of parents: How can I love my child enough? How can I fake the kid out if I don't love him or her? And, finally, how can I keep from passing on my own neuroses, my neural tics, my sadness, my weirdness, my greed, my self-loathing, on to the next generation? Forget it, author Ellen Gilchrist says. You cannot ever love your child enough.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sometimes the exertion it takes to slide that mouse across its pad and type in a lengthy URL--to actually have to seek the content you desire online--is just too much. "Push" technology was supposed to do that heavy lifting for us, but it died an ignoble death, largely because it tried to push too much content to our digital doorsteps. But the essence of push lives on in the often overlooked world of mailing lists, one of the oldest and least glamorous corners of the Internet.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|