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John Brown

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, But his soul goes marching on. --Author unknown * Wherever John Brown's soul may be, his son's body lies on an Altadena hilltop named for what may have been the most critical battle in the bloody Civil War that followed his father's storied death.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
On Wednesday night, the National Book Awards were presented at a black-tie dinner at Cipriani Wall Street in Manhattan. “The Oscars of the Book World,” host Mika Brzezinski called it, although, as Fran Lebowitz once sniffed, “It's the Oscars without money.” Brzezinski and Lebowitz represent what we might call the two opposing poles of the National Book Awards: celebrity and literature. Over the last decade or so - since a celebrated dust-up over the 2004 fiction finalists, only one of which had sold more than 2,000 copies - the National Book Foundation, which administers the prizes, has made a concerted effort to make them more high profile, more accessible, more fun. Don't get me wrong: I'm not suggesting that this has dumbed down the National Book Awards; just the contrary, in fact.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
High on an isolated summit above Altadena sits a crudely hewn headstone that may soon become a state point of historical interest. The stone marks the resting place of Owen Brown, son of abolitionist John Brown. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, responding to an appeal from John Brown's great-great granddaughters, on Tuesday asked the state Office of Historic Preservation to declare the site an official point of interest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
John Brown, the white abolitionist who sought to free black slaves with the barrel of a gun, is a recurring character in American literature. He's one of the ghosts that haunt Marilynne Robinson's "Gilead," and he's the messianic, brooding prophet at the heart of Russell Banks' epic "Cloudsplitter. " In the post-Civil War memoir of his contemporary, Frederick Douglass, Brown is a brave, principled man, with a plan to start a slave uprising that's plainly suicidal. In James McBride's new novel, "The Good Lord Bird," Brown is a comic figure, given to making religious speeches at strangely inappropriate moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can go home again, apparently. "John Brown's Body," Charles Laughton's stage adaptation of the epic Civil War poem by Stephen Vincent Benet, returned in a stirring revival to Santa Barbara's Lobero Theatre, the site of its premiere performance in 1952. This second installment in the Lobero Stage Company's inaugural season is far more substantial than the opener, the lavishly hollow "Death Takes a Holiday"--ironically, with substantially pared-down production values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1987 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
They all hated their names. Georgia Ricotta's gripe was having a cheese for a surname. "I am tired of being referred to as a cheese," she succinctly wrote the court. Clifford Morong's peeve was a matter of image. "I dislike Morong," the aspiring businessman scrawled, "as it is often misspelled Moron." Toddler Daisy Povieng's problem was a brother named Donald.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | JOHN LAIDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a small patch of grass alongside a quiet country road, a graying stone marker stands as the only memorial here to a man who links the city to one of the stormiest periods in American history. John Brown, the fierce anti-slavery crusader whose bloody raids in Kansas and Virginia helped plunge the nation into civil war, was born in a farmhouse at the site nearly 200 years ago. But while his memory is preserved at several historic locations, including Harper's Ferry, Va.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
John Brown, the white abolitionist who sought to free black slaves with the barrel of a gun, is a recurring character in American literature. He's one of the ghosts that haunt Marilynne Robinson's "Gilead," and he's the messianic, brooding prophet at the heart of Russell Banks' epic "Cloudsplitter. " In the post-Civil War memoir of his contemporary, Frederick Douglass, Brown is a brave, principled man, with a plan to start a slave uprising that's plainly suicidal. In James McBride's new novel, "The Good Lord Bird," Brown is a comic figure, given to making religious speeches at strangely inappropriate moments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2000 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for John George Brown, the man twice convicted of the 1980 killing of a Garden Grove police officer, tried to spare him the death penalty Monday by presenting witnesses who described Brown as a man troubled by a turbulent childhood. Two paternal uncles who had not seen Brown for nearly 30 years told jurors their nephew fled his Pawtucket, R.I., home when he was 15 to escape constant abuse from his parents. "They never gave him self-worth," Donald Brown, one of the uncles, testified.
BOOKS
May 1, 2005 | Eric Foner, Eric Foner is the DeWitt Clinton professor of history at Columbia University and author, most recently, of "Give Me Liberty! An American History."
John BROWN, the militant abolitionist who battled proslavery forces on the plains and led an assault on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry in the hope of inciting a slave insurrection, has always aroused powerful and conflicting emotions. An earlier generation of scholars, who saw the Civil War as needless carnage brought on by irresponsible fanatics, made Brown exhibit No. 1 -- a madman, criminal or, in today's lexicon, a terrorist who inflamed sectional hatred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
In the end, it was Heriberto Eddie Rodriguez's own words that saved his life. The prosecutor seeking his execution said Rodriguez's violent attacks against at least half a dozen Los Angeles County jail inmates, including one assault in which he beat and kicked a man to death, were proof that he was beyond redemption. But the 32-year-old former gang member took the witness stand in his defense and told jurors he was a changed man. He expressed remorse for his crime and denounced his membership in street and prison gangs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Even as he helped orchestrate the American Revolution and the creation of modern democracy, John Adams worried that the framers of history, more interested in portraiture than landscape, would choose one or two individuals - Benjamin Franklin, George Washington - to create a mythology of supermen who single-handedly built a nation. For years that fretful insight proved true, and though Adams eventually got his due, it certainly applies to other moments of cataclysmic change, none more so than the Civil War. Certainly in light of Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," one could be forgiven for believing that Abraham Lincoln was the driving force behind the abolition of slavery in America.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - John Henry Browne's first brush with the U.S. military was during the Vietnam War. The lanky attorney, then a student who drove a purple hippie van, was rejected for the draft because he was too tall. "I had done research, and I knew if you were over 6 foot 6 you were not qualified to go kill short people," said Browne, who has a 1969 photo of himself in an Uncle Sam hat towering above a sea of fellow antiwar protesters. "So I'd done a bunch of yoga and stretched myself - and I got some help from some Quaker doctors - and I went in with a letter saying I was close to 6-7, which I was at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2009 | Jack Leonard
A former airline baggage handler upset at having to pay his ex-girlfriend child support took their 4-year-old daughter for a walk along the Palos Verdes Peninsula and hurled the child off a 120-foot cliff to her death, a prosecutor told jurors Tuesday. Cameron John Brown, 47, decided to kill the girl as he waged a rancorous battle to reduce his court-ordered payments to her mother, whom he despised, Deputy Dist. Atty. Craig Hum told the jury at the close of a seven-week trial. Brown has long insisted he is innocent and told authorities that his daughter slipped and fell while throwing rocks off the bluff at Inspiration Point on Nov. 8, 2000.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2007
John Browne stepped down as chief executive of oil giant BP on Tuesday, three months earlier than planned, after losing a legal battle to prevent the publication of claims that he let a former boyfriend use company resources. London-based BP said that Tony Hayward, 49, who was scheduled to replace Browne on Aug. 1, took over the position immediately. BP said allegations that Browne misused resources were "unfounded or insubstantive."
BOOKS
May 14, 2006 | Jon Meacham, Jon Meacham, managing editor of Newsweek, is the author of "American Gospel: God, the Founding Fathers, and the Making of a Nation."
----- Sons of Providence The Brown Brothers, the Slave Trade, and the American Revolution Charles Rappleye Simon & Schuster: 402 pp., $27 ----- The Whiskey Rebellion George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty William Hogeland Scribner: 302 pp., $26.95 HIS wife was dead, his conscience stricken.
BOOKS
September 3, 1995 | Adam Begley, Adam Begley is at work on a book about nine contemporary novelists. He lives in Delavan, Wis
On Sunday, Oct. 16, 1859, John Brown led his doomed raid on the Harpers Ferry federal arsenal and armory. He was sure the guerrilla action would spark a slave insurrection in Virginia and Maryland and thus, by contagion of terror and violence, bring down the whole institution of slavery. A month and a half later, on the day of Brown's execution, at a memorial service in Concord, Mass., Henry David Thoreau proclaimed him a martyr to the cause of abolition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991
To take nothing away from your fine editorial or from King, I would like to point out that my great-great grandfather, "old" John Brown, was hanged at Harper's Ferry, West Virginia, 132 years ago for espousing and acting on the same principle "that all men are created equal." Yes--how long? I have a question: If we despise men of another color, are we not doubting the wisdom of our creator? ADELENE R. CRAIG Ventura
BOOKS
May 1, 2005 | Eric Foner, Eric Foner is the DeWitt Clinton professor of history at Columbia University and author, most recently, of "Give Me Liberty! An American History."
John BROWN, the militant abolitionist who battled proslavery forces on the plains and led an assault on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry in the hope of inciting a slave insurrection, has always aroused powerful and conflicting emotions. An earlier generation of scholars, who saw the Civil War as needless carnage brought on by irresponsible fanatics, made Brown exhibit No. 1 -- a madman, criminal or, in today's lexicon, a terrorist who inflamed sectional hatred.
SPORTS
March 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Azusa Pacific failed to win its first NAIA championship Tuesday, instead allowing unseeded John Brown to rally and become the first team from Arkansas to win the title, 65-55. Brandon Cole scored 25 points, including 12 on four straight possessions for the Golden Eagles of Siloam Springs, Ark. Pat Smits also made two three-point baskets in the final 1:49 for John Brown (24-11), which outscored Azusa (29-10) over the final five minutes, 13-6.
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