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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1991 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Browning gave the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove a run for its money Saturday night at Don Wash Auditorium. According to general manager Yaakov Dvir-Djerassi, Browning commands the largest fee ever offered by the board--$8,000--a sum that sent organizers racing for corporate sponsorship. Pianist and orchestra collaborated in Rachmaninoff's "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini," which requires lightning-quick repartee between solo and orchestral forces.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
John Brown, the white abolitionist who sought to free black slaves with the barrel of a gun, is a recurring character in American literature. He's one of the ghosts that haunt Marilynne Robinson's "Gilead," and he's the messianic, brooding prophet at the heart of Russell Banks' epic "Cloudsplitter. " In the post-Civil War memoir of his contemporary, Frederick Douglass, Brown is a brave, principled man, with a plan to start a slave uprising that's plainly suicidal. In James McBride's new novel, "The Good Lord Bird," Brown is a comic figure, given to making religious speeches at strangely inappropriate moments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jun'ichi Hirokami, the Tokyo-born conductor who again led the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Hollywood Bowl Thursday, wasn't even born when John Browning, soloist of the evening, first appeared there, in 1953. Earlier that summer, the American pianist had turned 20, but already was marked for high achievement. The intervening years have seen his promise fulfilled and the competition winner of the 1950s has become a respected veteran.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Even as he helped orchestrate the American Revolution and the creation of modern democracy, John Adams worried that the framers of history, more interested in portraiture than landscape, would choose one or two individuals - Benjamin Franklin, George Washington - to create a mythology of supermen who single-handedly built a nation. For years that fretful insight proved true, and though Adams eventually got his due, it certainly applies to other moments of cataclysmic change, none more so than the Civil War. Certainly in light of Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," one could be forgiven for believing that Abraham Lincoln was the driving force behind the abolition of slavery in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
John Browning, a pianist whose trademarks were elegance and brilliant technique, died Sunday at his home in Sister Bay, Wis. He was 69. Browning died of heart failure, his agent, Shirley Kirshbaum, said Wednesday. Like many other pianists of his generation, including Leon Fleisher, Malcolm Frager, Gary Graffman and Byron Janis, Browning was overshadowed by Van Cliburn, a classmate at the Juilliard School, after the young Texan won the gold medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1958.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES
Pianist John Browning usually hears the ghost of Rachmaninoff when he plays the composer's "Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini," which he'll do again Saturday, when he'll appear with the Orange County Symphony of Garden Grove. "All of us pianists can hear in our ear the so-called Rachmaninoff tradition, the way he played it," Browning, 57, said in a recent phone interview from his home in New York. "He was, in many ways, the most extraordinary pianist of anybody's memory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2000 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, John Brown's body lies a-moldering in the grave, But his soul goes marching on. --Author unknown * Wherever John Brown's soul may be, his son's body lies on an Altadena hilltop named for what may have been the most critical battle in the bloody Civil War that followed his father's storied death.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You can go home again, apparently. "John Brown's Body," Charles Laughton's stage adaptation of the epic Civil War poem by Stephen Vincent Benet, returned in a stirring revival to Santa Barbara's Lobero Theatre, the site of its premiere performance in 1952. This second installment in the Lobero Stage Company's inaugural season is far more substantial than the opener, the lavishly hollow "Death Takes a Holiday"--ironically, with substantially pared-down production values. Peter Hunt's deceptively simple staging relies on three principal performers--Linda Purl, Duncan Regehr and David Naughton, who read passages selected by Laughton from more than 300 pages of verse in Benet's tapestry of interwoven lives caught up in the convulsive struggle to shape the conscience and future of America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
High on an isolated summit above Altadena sits a crudely hewn headstone that may soon become a state point of historical interest. The stone marks the resting place of Owen Brown, son of abolitionist John Brown. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, responding to an appeal from John Brown's great-great granddaughters, on Tuesday asked the state Office of Historic Preservation to declare the site an official point of interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1987 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
They all hated their names. Georgia Ricotta's gripe was having a cheese for a surname. "I am tired of being referred to as a cheese," she succinctly wrote the court. Clifford Morong's peeve was a matter of image. "I dislike Morong," the aspiring businessman scrawled, "as it is often misspelled Moron." Toddler Daisy Povieng's problem was a brother named Donald.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
SEATTLE - John Henry Browne's first brush with the U.S. military was during the Vietnam War. The lanky attorney, then a student who drove a purple hippie van, was rejected for the draft because he was too tall. "I had done research, and I knew if you were over 6 foot 6 you were not qualified to go kill short people," said Browne, who has a 1969 photo of himself in an Uncle Sam hat towering above a sea of fellow antiwar protesters. "So I'd done a bunch of yoga and stretched myself - and I got some help from some Quaker doctors - and I went in with a letter saying I was close to 6-7, which I was at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2009 | Jack Leonard
A former airline baggage handler upset at having to pay his ex-girlfriend child support took their 4-year-old daughter for a walk along the Palos Verdes Peninsula and hurled the child off a 120-foot cliff to her death, a prosecutor told jurors Tuesday. Cameron John Brown, 47, decided to kill the girl as he waged a rancorous battle to reduce his court-ordered payments to her mother, whom he despised, Deputy Dist. Atty. Craig Hum told the jury at the close of a seven-week trial. Brown has long insisted he is innocent and told authorities that his daughter slipped and fell while throwing rocks off the bluff at Inspiration Point on Nov. 8, 2000.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2007
John Browne stepped down as chief executive of oil giant BP on Tuesday, three months earlier than planned, after losing a legal battle to prevent the publication of claims that he let a former boyfriend use company resources. London-based BP said that Tony Hayward, 49, who was scheduled to replace Browne on Aug. 1, took over the position immediately. BP said allegations that Browne misused resources were "unfounded or insubstantive."
BOOKS
May 1, 2005 | Eric Foner, Eric Foner is the DeWitt Clinton professor of history at Columbia University and author, most recently, of "Give Me Liberty! An American History."
John BROWN, the militant abolitionist who battled proslavery forces on the plains and led an assault on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry in the hope of inciting a slave insurrection, has always aroused powerful and conflicting emotions. An earlier generation of scholars, who saw the Civil War as needless carnage brought on by irresponsible fanatics, made Brown exhibit No. 1 -- a madman, criminal or, in today's lexicon, a terrorist who inflamed sectional hatred.
SPORTS
March 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Azusa Pacific failed to win its first NAIA championship Tuesday, instead allowing unseeded John Brown to rally and become the first team from Arkansas to win the title, 65-55. Brandon Cole scored 25 points, including 12 on four straight possessions for the Golden Eagles of Siloam Springs, Ark. Pat Smits also made two three-point baskets in the final 1:49 for John Brown (24-11), which outscored Azusa (29-10) over the final five minutes, 13-6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
John Browning, a pianist whose trademarks were elegance and brilliant technique, died Sunday at his home in Sister Bay, Wis. He was 69. Browning died of heart failure, his agent, Shirley Kirshbaum, said Wednesday. Like many other pianists of his generation, including Leon Fleisher, Malcolm Frager, Gary Graffman and Byron Janis, Browning was overshadowed by Van Cliburn, a classmate at the Juilliard School, after the young Texan won the gold medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1958.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1987 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
They all hated their names. Georgia Ricotta's gripe was having a cheese for a surname. "I am tired of being referred to as a cheese," she succinctly wrote the court. Clifford Morong's peeve was a matter of image. "I dislike Morong," the aspiring businessman scrawled, "as it is often misspelled Moron." Toddler Daisy Povieng's problem was a brother named Donald.
BOOKS
September 30, 2001 | SVEN BIRKERTS, Sven Birkerts is the author of five books of essays and will publish a memoir next year
Eccentric genius bird artist John James Audubon seems to exert considerable attraction on the literary imagination. Years ago, Robert Penn Warren wrote a meditative book-length poem, "Audubon: A Vision" from his life and far-flung wanderings. Earlier this year novelist Maureen Howard used the man as a central figure in part of "Big as Life: Three Tales for Spring," a suite of thematically resonant tales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2000 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convicted cop killer who spent 16 years awaiting his execution before winning a new trial was ordered back to death row Friday. Orange County Superior Court Judge John Ryan called the murder "cold-blooded" before he affirmed a jury's recommendation that John George Brown, 53, be returned to death row for the 1980 slaying of a Garden Grove police officer. Reed's widow, Linda, and his sister, Suzanne Reed Schumacher, read statements before the sentencing.
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