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John Burnham Schwartz

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NEWS
May 2, 1989 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Staff Writer
Tapping away on their manuscripts in the dead of night, fledgling novelists cherish their fantasies. There is the over-the-transom fantasy, an old standby in which the manuscript is submitted anonymously and becomes a best-seller. Or, there is the chance-encounter fantasy, in which the aspiring writer runs his grocery cart (skateboard, 1975 Toyota, fill in the blanks) into the famous editor, and voila! , instant publishing opportunity. But the senior thesis fantasy?
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2008 | Janice P. Nimura, Special to The Times
FOR nearly 15 years the world has watched the antifairy tale of Masako Owada, the cosmopolitan, Harvard-and-Oxford-educated, up-and-coming diplomat who had the singular misfortune to captivate Crown Prince Naruhito of Japan. Like a maiden in a storybook, she demurred three times and at last consented to abandon her career and become crown princess.
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BOOKS
September 20, 1998 | BRET LOTT, Bret Lott is the author of eight books, most recently "The Hunt Club," a novel, and "Fathers, Sons and Brothers," a memoir
"Reservation Road" is the story of a grief we'd rather not contemplate: the death of a child. And though stories like this don't always make for the most appealing reads precisely because this is a possibility every parent must secret away to make it through a day, what John Burnham Schwartz has given us is a dark and irresistible miracle: a heartbreaking thriller. On their way home from a Sunday afternoon picnic and evening outdoor concert in Canaan, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2008 | Janice P. Nimura, Special to The Times
FOR nearly 15 years the world has watched the antifairy tale of Masako Owada, the cosmopolitan, Harvard-and-Oxford-educated, up-and-coming diplomat who had the singular misfortune to captivate Crown Prince Naruhito of Japan. Like a maiden in a storybook, she demurred three times and at last consented to abandon her career and become crown princess.
BOOKS
January 20, 2008
Richard Rayner reviews "Duma Key," a novel by Stephen King. Janice P. Nimura reviews "The Commoner," a novel by John Burnham Schwartz. Tim Rutten reviews "God's Crucible: Islam and the Making of Europe, 570-1215" by David Levering Lewis. The following reviews are scheduled: Erik Himmelsbach reviews "Comedy at the Edge: How Stand-Up in the 1970s Changed America" by Richard Zoglin.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | JONATHAN SHIPLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
CLAIRE MARVEL A Novel By John Burnham Schwartz Nan A. Talese/Doubleday 304 pages; $25 John Burnham Schwartz has made a habit of discussing the pitfalls and pinnacles of love in his writing. In his first novel, "Bicycle Days," Schwartz tells the tale of a young American man coming of age in Japan. In "Reservation Road," the story is of a family whose son dies in a hit-and-run, detailing how the accident twists the characters' life trajectories.
SPORTS
January 9, 2002 | Tim Brown
Judging by the reaction to his latest book giveaway, Phil Jackson ought to save his money next year. Jackson hands out books on the first extended trip of each season, and this year's Lakers received theirs on Saturday's flight to Toronto. By Tuesday night, most of the players could not name the title or author of their book, and many had no intention of reading them anyway. Ah, the price of education.
BOOKS
July 24, 2005 | Emily Green, Emily Green is a Times staff writer.
Who is more vain than a writer? In the case of "The Secret Society of Demolition Writers," a dozen of them. We are told that Aimee Bender, Benjamin Cheever, Michael Connelly, Sebastian Junger, Elizabeth McCracken, Rosie O'Donnell, Chris Offutt, Marc Parent, Anna Quindlen, John Burnham Schwartz, Alice Sebold and Lauren Slater all contributed short stories to it. What editor Parent isn't telling is: Who wrote which one?
BOOKS
September 20, 1998 | BRET LOTT, Bret Lott is the author of eight books, most recently "The Hunt Club," a novel, and "Fathers, Sons and Brothers," a memoir
"Reservation Road" is the story of a grief we'd rather not contemplate: the death of a child. And though stories like this don't always make for the most appealing reads precisely because this is a possibility every parent must secret away to make it through a day, what John Burnham Schwartz has given us is a dark and irresistible miracle: a heartbreaking thriller. On their way home from a Sunday afternoon picnic and evening outdoor concert in Canaan, Conn.
NEWS
May 2, 1989 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Staff Writer
Tapping away on their manuscripts in the dead of night, fledgling novelists cherish their fantasies. There is the over-the-transom fantasy, an old standby in which the manuscript is submitted anonymously and becomes a best-seller. Or, there is the chance-encounter fantasy, in which the aspiring writer runs his grocery cart (skateboard, 1975 Toyota, fill in the blanks) into the famous editor, and voila! , instant publishing opportunity. But the senior thesis fantasy?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Neither involving as a study in grief nor compelling as a thriller about conscience, the cat-and-mouse tragedy "Reservation Road" is a misery windup so schematic and obvious it reduces its crisis-stricken characters to little more than emotional bumper cars. Based on a 1998 novel by John Burnham Schwartz, who adapted it with director Terry George, the Connecticut-set film quickly gets to its defining moment: a fatal hit-and-run.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2010 | Dean Kuipers
Reporting from Maui — We've been batting our way through W.S. Merwin's yard for a couple hours, swatting mosquitoes in the streambed under the dark wet canopy of towering, philodendron-draped mangoes and looking at some 700 species of palm trees, every one of which he has planted by hand. He stops to touch them, saying things like, "Oh, this is Carpoxylon macrocarpa ; they were thought to be extinct on Madagascar, but here it is. " Many of these trees are exceptionally rare.
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