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January 1, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who runs Panama has an office in the Presidential Palace and roars through town in a bulletproof limousine accompanied by armored cars full of large, heavily armed bodyguards who wear ominous dark glasses. He decides who can walk free and who goes to jail, when citizens can be on the street and when they have to be in their houses, and even what avenues are open to traffic.
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NEWS
January 1, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who runs Panama has an office in the Presidential Palace and roars through town in a bulletproof limousine accompanied by armored cars full of large, heavily armed bodyguards who wear ominous dark glasses. He decides who can walk free and who goes to jail, when citizens can be on the street and when they have to be in their houses, and even what avenues are open to traffic.
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NEWS
October 28, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush, who was in Hawaii on Saturday, nominated foreign service veteran John A. Bushnell as ambassador to Costa Rica, succeeding Deane Hinton. Bushnell has been deputy chief of mission to Panama since 1989.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that U.S. forces have scored a quick military victory in Panama, what do they do next? The danger facing American troops over the next few weeks and months, military analysts said Wednesday, is that the new civilian government headed by President Guillermo Endara may not be strong enough to rule on its own.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. troops smashed the regime of Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega today and installed a new government, but the military ruler who antagonized a superpower fled into hiding and his loyalists seized some Americans. More than 20,000 troops backed by warplanes began their invasion shortly after midnight Tuesday under a full moon, pounding Panamanian military installations in and around the capital with mortar, cannon and machine-gun fire.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Embassy in Rome will celebrate its annual Fourth of July party this week on the Fifth of July. If the embassy did not shift the date and insisted instead on clinging to the good old American way, no Italian or any other foreigner would show up, because on July 4, all of them will be watching the semifinal match of the World Cup soccer tournament.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1985 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Silvia Sweaney has always dreamed of owning a telescope, and now she figures there is a good reason to buy one. "I was looking to spend $1,200," said Sweaney, 34, ogling the gleaming tubes of mostly expensive telescopes on display at a Scope City store in Costa Mesa. "Because of Halley's Comet, I'm going to spend $2,400--which really means $3,000, including accessories." People such as Sweaney have caught Scope City President Maurice Sweiss, among other retailers, pleasantly off guard.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL and BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was in the wee hours of the morning last Wednesday, and Jorge Ortega and his mother were still up, putting the finishing touches on the Christmas tree in the apartment they shared in the modest barrio of Chorrillo. The television, tuned to a station beamed from a nearby U.S. military base, flickered quietly in the background.
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