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John C Fremont

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1997
Re "The Rest Is History," Jan. 13. I would like to make a comment about the so-called Treaty of Cahuenga. Simply put, there was no such thing. The only thing that happened at Cahuenga on Jan. 13, 1847, was that the (Mexican) Army of California agreed to capitulate to a particular army of the United States. (John C. Fremont was technically a naval officer and got himself court-martialed for signing the "treaty" and other indiscretions). The Californios didn't much care for rule by Mexico City, and most Californios were glad to have the U.S. takeover, honor having been served with scattered fighting having taken place across much of the province.
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NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - She was called the "the most famous woman in Los Angeles. " That was how the wife of famed "Pathfinder" John C. Fremont was described in her Los Angeles Times obituary in 1902. Though she is not as well known today, she could be on the way to gaining a higher profile - one more than 12,100 feet high. Legislation to name a mountain peak in Yosemite National Park as Mt. Jessie Benton Fremont is now before Congress. Related: The ultimate guide to Yosemite The measure, a tribute to Jessie Benton Fremont's efforts to preserve the land that would become the park, comes on this year's 150th anniversary of President Lincoln signing the bill granting Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove, a stand of some of the world's largest trees, to the state of California as a public trust.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1997
Re "Historical Facts," Jan. 26. The capitulation at Cahuenga and the Treaty of Cahuenga are the same event; some favor the one or the other. Under the terms, each Mexican was to conform to U.S. law and accept the conditions of the capitulation by supporting the peace and tranquillity of the agreement, and all prisoners would be released. Those who did not wish to stay could leave for Mexico. Lt. Col. John C. Fremont has some major historical detractors who dispute his outstanding record as an explorer, surveyor and soldier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999
Historic Campo de Cahuenga, relatively unknown but probably the most significant historic place in California, must be preserved! This is the place where, in 1847, Col. John C. Fremont, representing the United States, accepted the surrender of Gen. Andres Pico's Mexican forces, thereby ending the war between the U.S. and Mexico. The signing of this treaty led to the subsequent inclusion of California as a state. During excavation by the MTA for the subway station near the front of the property along Lankershim Boulevard, a portion of the original foundation of the building was discovered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999
Historic Campo de Cahuenga, relatively unknown but probably the most significant historic place in California, must be preserved! This is the place where, in 1847, Col. John C. Fremont, representing the United States, accepted the surrender of Gen. Andres Pico's Mexican forces, thereby ending the war between the U.S. and Mexico. The signing of this treaty led to the subsequent inclusion of California as a state. During excavation by the MTA for the subway station near the front of the property along Lankershim Boulevard, a portion of the original foundation of the building was discovered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1998 | TOM BECKER
On Jan. 13, 1847, American soldier John C. Fremont didn't follow orders and instead helped produce the unofficial end to the Mexican-American War. Lt. Col. Fremont and Mexican Gen. Andres Pico signed the Campo de Cahuenga treaty, ending hostilities between the two nations and setting the wheels in motion for California to become part of the United States. Fremont was arrested and jailed for his actions, and although he was pardoned by President James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1985 | MAYERENE BARKER, Times Staff Writer
Members of the Campo de Cahuenga Assn., their ranks depleted by the passing of time, gathered Sunday for the 35th consecutive year to commemorate the signing of a treaty between Mexico and the United States that eventually led to statehood for California. "I thought there would be more here," said George Shipley, the 75-year-old president of the association that sponsors the event. "At one time, we had as many as 450 people attend this program."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Except for California's becoming the 31st state, the 50-year marriage between the pioneer soldier John C. Fremont and Jessie Benton may have been the most consequential union in California history. In any event, a careful observer of the 19th century couple's long and dramatic life together probably would want to revise the old maxim to read: Behind this great man was an even greater woman.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
It's bad enough admitting you live in the Valley, but what on earth could you show visiting know-it-alls from some place like New York or London or Gettysburg, Pa., for that matter? Sure it's all a bad rap, all those stereotypical jokes about the Valley and Valspeak and time warps. Nobody says "wellll, grody, fer surrrre" any more except obnoxious cousins from New York eager to wax up the old image that you have guacamole for brains and they are the Carborundum on which the cutting edge of hip is sharpened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
Map-making was his trade, but fortuitous timing and perhaps his own derring-do led explorer John C. "The Pathfinder" Fremont into history books as one of America's more spectacular and controversial figures. A native of Savannah, Ga., Fremont was on his third expedition with the U.S. Army Topographical Corps when he arrived in California on the eve of the Mexican War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
Except for California's becoming the 31st state, the 50-year marriage between the pioneer soldier John C. Fremont and Jessie Benton may have been the most consequential union in California history. In any event, a careful observer of the 19th century couple's long and dramatic life together probably would want to revise the old maxim to read: Behind this great man was an even greater woman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1998 | TOM BECKER
On Jan. 13, 1847, American soldier John C. Fremont didn't follow orders and instead helped produce the unofficial end to the Mexican-American War. Lt. Col. Fremont and Mexican Gen. Andres Pico signed the Campo de Cahuenga treaty, ending hostilities between the two nations and setting the wheels in motion for California to become part of the United States. Fremont was arrested and jailed for his actions, and although he was pardoned by President James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997 | ROB O'NEIL
Map-making was his trade, but fortuitous timing and perhaps his own derring-do led explorer John C. "The Pathfinder" Fremont into history books as one of America's more spectacular and controversial figures. A native of Savannah, Ga., Fremont was on his third expedition with the U.S. Army Topographical Corps when he arrived in California on the eve of the Mexican War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1997
Re "Historical Facts," Jan. 26. The capitulation at Cahuenga and the Treaty of Cahuenga are the same event; some favor the one or the other. Under the terms, each Mexican was to conform to U.S. law and accept the conditions of the capitulation by supporting the peace and tranquillity of the agreement, and all prisoners would be released. Those who did not wish to stay could leave for Mexico. Lt. Col. John C. Fremont has some major historical detractors who dispute his outstanding record as an explorer, surveyor and soldier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1997
Re "The Rest Is History," Jan. 13. I would like to make a comment about the so-called Treaty of Cahuenga. Simply put, there was no such thing. The only thing that happened at Cahuenga on Jan. 13, 1847, was that the (Mexican) Army of California agreed to capitulate to a particular army of the United States. (John C. Fremont was technically a naval officer and got himself court-martialed for signing the "treaty" and other indiscretions). The Californios didn't much care for rule by Mexico City, and most Californios were glad to have the U.S. takeover, honor having been served with scattered fighting having taken place across much of the province.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
It's bad enough admitting you live in the Valley, but what on earth could you show visiting know-it-alls from some place like New York or London or Gettysburg, Pa., for that matter? Sure it's all a bad rap, all those stereotypical jokes about the Valley and Valspeak and time warps. Nobody says "wellll, grody, fer surrrre" any more except obnoxious cousins from New York eager to wax up the old image that you have guacamole for brains and they are the Carborundum on which the cutting edge of hip is sharpened.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - She was called the "the most famous woman in Los Angeles. " That was how the wife of famed "Pathfinder" John C. Fremont was described in her Los Angeles Times obituary in 1902. Though she is not as well known today, she could be on the way to gaining a higher profile - one more than 12,100 feet high. Legislation to name a mountain peak in Yosemite National Park as Mt. Jessie Benton Fremont is now before Congress. Related: The ultimate guide to Yosemite The measure, a tribute to Jessie Benton Fremont's efforts to preserve the land that would become the park, comes on this year's 150th anniversary of President Lincoln signing the bill granting Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove, a stand of some of the world's largest trees, to the state of California as a public trust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1989 | Researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
The names of many Los Angeles streets have changed repeatedly over the years, reflecting the city's transformation from a tiny Mexican colonial town to a booming metropolis. Some streets, predictably, honor war heroes and explorers. But others have been named for trees, actors, land developers and--in one case--the proximity of a bullfighting ring. These days, it is not easy to change the name of a street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1985 | MAYERENE BARKER, Times Staff Writer
Members of the Campo de Cahuenga Assn., their ranks depleted by the passing of time, gathered Sunday for the 35th consecutive year to commemorate the signing of a treaty between Mexico and the United States that eventually led to statehood for California. "I thought there would be more here," said George Shipley, the 75-year-old president of the association that sponsors the event. "At one time, we had as many as 450 people attend this program."
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