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John C Hueston

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February 25, 2007 | Judy Pasternak, Times Staff Writer
The Southern California lawyer who successfully prosecuted top Enron executives has been hired by the Navajo tribal government to seek a full cleanup of the old uranium mines contaminating the country's largest reservation. John C. Hueston, who gained fame for his questioning of Enron founder Kenneth L. Lay, contacted the tribe in November after reading articles in The Times about the poisoning of the Navajo homeland as the government mined uranium for use in nuclear weapons.
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February 25, 2007 | Judy Pasternak, Times Staff Writer
The Southern California lawyer who successfully prosecuted top Enron executives has been hired by the Navajo tribal government to seek a full cleanup of the old uranium mines contaminating the country's largest reservation. John C. Hueston, who gained fame for his questioning of Enron founder Kenneth L. Lay, contacted the tribe in November after reading articles in The Times about the poisoning of the Navajo homeland as the government mined uranium for use in nuclear weapons.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
While jurors deliberate the outcome of the fraud and conspiracy trial of Enron Corp. founder Kenneth L. Lay and former Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling, Lay is on trial again without a jury on charges stemming from his personal banking. The 64-year-old former chairman spent six days on the witness stand during the conspiracy trial, often combative and contentious with federal prosecutor John C. Hueston, who secured the indictment against Lay nearly two years ago.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Former Enron Corp. Chairman Kenneth L. Lay on Tuesday concluded his testimony by again asserting that the criminal case against him amounts to second-guessing by the government of decisions he made "in real time" as the energy company he founded veered toward collapse in late 2001. "I loved Enron very much and I loved Enron's employees very much," Lay said. "The most painful thing in my life was watching Enron go into bankruptcy." Lay, 64, and former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
The sideshow legal proceeding to the 3 1/2 -month Enron Corp. trial wound down Tuesday with company founder Kenneth L. Lay testifying that he had no intention to commit fraud when he violated provisions of a Depression-era banking law. Lay acknowledged his signature on forms explaining the law, known as Regulation U, but added, "I doubt I read in detail any of those loan documents." He portrayed himself as only vaguely familiar with the law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge agreed Thursday to sharply limit the contact between animal rights activists and researchers at UCLA who had been targeted for their work with animals. In a Santa Monica courtroom, Judge Gerald Rosenberg granted most of the terms sought by attorneys for the Regents of the University of California in a temporary restraining order against five individual activists and three animal rights groups.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2006 | From Reuters and the Associated Press
A federal prosecutor accused former Enron Corp. Chairman Kenneth L. Lay on Thursday of withholding key financial data from analysts and hiding his sales of millions of dollars of company stock in the months before Enron collapsed in December 2001. Prosecutor John C. Hueston pressed Lay about statements he made to analysts about the energy company's retail unit less than two months before the company filed for bankruptcy protection.
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May 17, 2007 | Judy Pasternak, Times Staff Writer
El Paso Natural Gas Co. is lending support to a new Navajo effort to force federal cleanup of one of the Cold War's last major toxic legacies. El Paso filed a lawsuit Tuesday in U.S. District Court against the Department of Energy and other federal agencies, seeking cleanup of debris from an old uranium processing mill that the company operated. "We view them as the appropriate party," El Paso spokesman Bruce Connery said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2006 | Molly Selvin and Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writers
Following a well-trod path of lawyers who have moved from government service into big private law firms, the U.S. attorney in Los Angeles announced that she will join the white-collar defense group at Gibson Dunn & Crutcher in January. Debra Wong Yang, the first Asian American top prosecutor in the United States, said Tuesday that she will sign on with the Los Angeles-based firm, co-chairing its crisis management group with Theodore B. Olson, the former U.S.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan and Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writers
The death of Enron Corp. founder Kenneth L. Lay early Wednesday raises the possibility that his conviction could be erased, complicating the federal government's effort to close the books on one of its most ambitious corporate fraud prosecutions. Lay, who at age 64 succumbed to a massive heart attack at a rented Colorado vacation home, was found guilty by a federal jury in May along with former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling of conspiracy and fraud.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2006 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
Solicited by top law firms across the country after reducing Kenneth L. Lay to stutters during the Enron trial, Assistant U.S. Atty. John C. Hueston announced Wednesday that he had decided to return home and work for a Southern California law firm. Hueston -- almost as famous for his late-night chin-up sessions in the Houston courthouse as for grilling the late founder of the fallen energy company -- will become a partner at Irell & Manella next month.
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