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John C Lawn

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NEWS
January 5, 1985 | United Press International
Francis M. Mullen Jr. resigned Friday as head of the Drug Enforcement Administration to take a job in private industry. Mullen, 50, sent a letter of resignation to President Reagan, saying he was leaving government effective March 1. A spokesman said Mullen is considering two job offers in the private sector.
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NEWS
May 12, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Friday that he intends to name U.S. District Judge Robert C. Bonner of Los Angeles to head the Drug Enforcement Administration. The 48-year-old Bonner, U.S. attorney before his appointment to the bench less than a year ago, is considered a surprise choice to head the federal government's chief drug-fighting agency. Meanwhile, in a major shake-up at the Justice Department, Donald B. Ayer quit as the agency's No.
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NEWS
February 28, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John C. Lawn, who has headed the Drug Enforcement Administration for five tumultuous years, will resign next month to become an executive with the New York Yankees, the agency announced Tuesday. The former FBI agent presided over record increases in the ranks of drug-fighting agents but insisted from the start that the war on drugs could not be won through law enforcement alone.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only two years ago, a Navy commander who had done a bang-up job of training Bolivian naval officers to run anti-drug river patrols turned down an offer to extend his six-month tour with the Drug Enforcement Administration. As a career move, "it would have been to his detriment to continue to assist us," recalled DEA Administrator John C. Lawn, who was so pleased with the commander's performance that he had personally urged him to extend his temporary assignment.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Friday that he intends to name U.S. District Judge Robert C. Bonner of Los Angeles to head the Drug Enforcement Administration. The 48-year-old Bonner, U.S. attorney before his appointment to the bench less than a year ago, is considered a surprise choice to head the federal government's chief drug-fighting agency. Meanwhile, in a major shake-up at the Justice Department, Donald B. Ayer quit as the agency's No.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only two years ago, a Navy commander who had done a bang-up job of training Bolivian naval officers to run anti-drug river patrols turned down an offer to extend his six-month tour with the Drug Enforcement Administration. As a career move, "it would have been to his detriment to continue to assist us," recalled DEA Administrator John C. Lawn, who was so pleased with the commander's performance that he had personally urged him to extend his temporary assignment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan said Thursday that he will nominate John C. Lawn, deputy administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration and a former FBI agent, as DEA administrator.
NEWS
July 13, 1988
Panama continues to cooperate in fighting drug trafficking despite the U.S. indictment of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega and efforts to force him from power, the head of the Drug Enforcement Administration told a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee. John C. Lawn said that "recent political and economic turmoil seems to have caused a reduction in the use of Panama" as a money-laundering center for drug profits.
NEWS
October 8, 1985
The Drug Enforcement Administration, resuming a campaign to eradicate marijuana plants with herbicides, sprayed a six-acre plot of federal land in a remote area of New Mexico last weekend, the agency announced in Washington. DEA Administrator John C. Lawn said the land near Carlsbad contained between 35,000 and 40,000 mature marijuana plants and was sprayed from the air with the herbicide glyphosphate.
NEWS
March 2, 1986
The Drug Enforcement Administration said that half the cocaine seized in Florida by the end of 1985 contained a cancer-causing chemical, and officials warned that more than half the cocaine now on the streets nationwide is contaminated with the carcinogen. DEA Administrator John C. Lawn called the situation "extremely dangerous," although he said the extent of the health threat will not be known until an investigation is completed by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John C. Lawn, who has headed the Drug Enforcement Administration for five tumultuous years, will resign next month to become an executive with the New York Yankees, the agency announced Tuesday. The former FBI agent presided over record increases in the ranks of drug-fighting agents but insisted from the start that the war on drugs could not be won through law enforcement alone.
NEWS
January 5, 1985 | United Press International
Francis M. Mullen Jr. resigned Friday as head of the Drug Enforcement Administration to take a job in private industry. Mullen, 50, sent a letter of resignation to President Reagan, saying he was leaving government effective March 1. A spokesman said Mullen is considering two job offers in the private sector.
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