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John C Mather

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BUSINESS
July 4, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would take reams of paper and rooms of statisticians to manually track costs for each of the 13 different defense programs under contract at Northrop Corp.'s Electronic Systems Division in Hawthorne. Since 1983, however, Bill Ponder, manager of administrative systems at the unit, has used a computer software program to help monitor the 5,000 subcontracts and 90,000 statistical tracking categories for each of the division's programs, which include the guidance system for the MX missile.
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BUSINESS
July 4, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would take reams of paper and rooms of statisticians to manually track costs for each of the 13 different defense programs under contract at Northrop Corp.'s Electronic Systems Division in Hawthorne. Since 1983, however, Bill Ponder, manager of administrative systems at the unit, has used a computer software program to help monitor the 5,000 subcontracts and 90,000 statistical tracking categories for each of the division's programs, which include the guidance system for the MX missile.
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SCIENCE
October 4, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Two astrophysicists from Berkeley and NASA won the 2006 Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for their discovery of the strongest evidence to date that the universe began with a big bang, a feat the Nobel committee said "marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." John C. Mather, 60, of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
For the first time, scientists have observed long-sought relics of the "Big Bang," the controversial theory that the universe was created by a primeval explosion 15 billion years ago. These relics--massive wisps of gas more than 500 million light-years long--are the largest and oldest structures ever observed, astrophysicist George Smoot of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory said Thursday at a meeting of the American Physical Society in Washington.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In recent years, scientists have been baffled by the discovery of huge bubbles in the universe that seem to be devoid of matter and by giant walls of galaxies that stretch on for hundreds of millions of light-years. No one could determine what mysterious forces would have created such giant structures. Some theorists have suggested that massive explosions might have swept some areas clean, creating the bubbles and pushing matter together to form great walls of galaxies.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2006 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
The NASA library in Greenbelt, Md., was part of John C. Mather's daily routine for years leading up to the astrophysicist's sharing of the 2006 Nobel Prize for shedding new light on the big bang theory of creation. He researched existing space hardware and instrumentation there while designing a satellite that collected data for his prize-winning discovery. So when he learned that federal officials were planning to close the library, Mather was stunned. "It is completely absurd," he said.
NEWS
October 4, 2006 | Andrew Malcolm and Brian Hanrahan, Times Staff Writers
Oh, Canada's drugs are OK The federal government will halt its controversial confiscation of discount drugs mailed to U.S. customers from Canadian pharmacies. The move by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which oversees Customs Border Patrol, reverses a policy that began 11 months ago -- around the time enrollment began for the Medicare drug plan. The initial justification for the confiscations was concern over the safety of drugs not manufactured in the United States.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Piercing through the early morning California sky on a tail of flame, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's last unmanned, expendable rocket soared into space at 6:34 a.m. Saturday. The 116-foot-tall Delta rocket carried with it the first of five orbiting astronomical observatories that NASA will launch during the next decade, a $150-million space telescope that is designed to study the afterglow of the creation of the universe.
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