Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Callahan
IN THE NEWS

John Callahan

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
September 8, 1991
Your article on cartoonist John Callahan ("Rolling Thunder," by Ann Japenga, July 28) was mesmerizing. Such incredible guts and determination coupled with a screwy talent should receive aid from those of us who can appreciate and even revere his gutty determination. A thought: Would it not be possible for one of our millionaires to alleviate the financial burdens of John Callahan, so that he doesn't have to worry about Medicaid payments being withheld because he makes a couple of bucks from his irreverent, somewhat mad but often wryly humorous gems?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
John Callahan, the quadriplegic cartoonist whose famously politically incorrect humor generated both praise and criticism, has died. He was 59. Callahan died Saturday at Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Ore., after undergoing surgery and treatment for a chronic bed sore, said Kevin Mullane, a longtime friend. Paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident in 1972 at age 21 and a recovering alcoholic since he was 27, Callahan began selling cartoons in the early 1980s and went on to be internationally syndicated in newspapers and magazines.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
John Callahan, the quadriplegic cartoonist whose famously politically incorrect humor generated both praise and criticism, has died. He was 59. Callahan died Saturday at Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Ore., after undergoing surgery and treatment for a chronic bed sore, said Kevin Mullane, a longtime friend. Paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident in 1972 at age 21 and a recovering alcoholic since he was 27, Callahan began selling cartoons in the early 1980s and went on to be internationally syndicated in newspapers and magazines.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1994 | JAMES GRANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the eyes are the entrance to the soul, then it doesn't seem much of a stretch that an artist's work may offer an invitation inside his brain. If that's the case, cartoonist and writer John Callahan must possess a brilliant, and twisted, mind indeed. The controversial artist's animated film, "I Think I Was an Alcoholic," is a highlight of the "24th International Tournee of Animation" running at the Nuart in West Los Angeles until Feb. 3.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1991 | Ann Japenga, Ann Japenga is a free-lance writer based in Washington state.
THERE'S AN UNEXPECTED PERK THAT GOES WITH THE JOB DEscription "recovering-alcoholic quadriplegic cartoonist": Women. Lots of them. Strange women approach John Callahan when he's tooling around Portland, Oregon, in his wheelchair; they tuck phone numbers in his blazer pocket ("Call me any time!"), mail him provocative photographs of themselves and consult him on matters more appropriate for Dr. Ruth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1994 | JAMES GRANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the eyes are the entrance to the soul, then it doesn't seem much of a stretch that an artist's work may offer an invitation inside his brain. If that's the case, cartoonist and writer John Callahan must possess a brilliant, and twisted, mind indeed. The controversial artist's animated film, "I Think I Was an Alcoholic," is a highlight of the "24th International Tournee of Animation" running at the Nuart in West Los Angeles until Feb. 3.
NEWS
May 9, 1985
A businessman was arrested on suspicion of deliberately setting a fire that caused $300,000 damage to a competitor's restaurant in Westwood, authorities said. Michael Shams, 31, owner of the Tanouri Restaurant, 1442 Westwood Blvd., was booked for investigation of arson in connection with a blaze at Shahrezad Persian Restaurant, 1422 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles Fire Department Capt. John Callahan said. Investigators found Shams at Harbor General-UCLA Medical Center, where he was being treated for burns.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | John M. Wilson \f7
William Hurt has beaten out such heavyweight production companies as Guber-Peters to nab the dramatic rights to the life story of John Callahan, paralyzed from the chest down in an L.A. car accident in 1972 at age 21. Callahan overcame alcoholism 11 years ago and today is a syndicated cartoonist in Portland, Ore., sketching offbeat, sometimes mordant cartoons with his weakened right hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Funeral services were held Saturday for a woman who saved her two children from a Hollywood hotel fire before falling to her death. A Fire Department honor guard attended services for Norma Galindo at Immaculate Heart of Mary, a Roman Catholic church in Hollywood. "We all saw the bravery that Norma Galindo showed at the fire scene and the firefighters recognize that and wanted to be here today to express that to her family," Deputy Fire Chief John Callahan said. The fire Aug.
MAGAZINE
September 8, 1991
I was enjoying the article until Callahan/you broke his personal anonymity. This anonymity is the 12th and last tradition of Alcoholics Anonymous, which, thankfully, most active members observe. LEE ANONYMOUS Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1991 | Ann Japenga, Ann Japenga is a free-lance writer based in Washington state.
THERE'S AN UNEXPECTED PERK THAT GOES WITH THE JOB DEscription "recovering-alcoholic quadriplegic cartoonist": Women. Lots of them. Strange women approach John Callahan when he's tooling around Portland, Oregon, in his wheelchair; they tuck phone numbers in his blazer pocket ("Call me any time!"), mail him provocative photographs of themselves and consult him on matters more appropriate for Dr. Ruth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1989 | John M. Wilson \f7
William Hurt has beaten out such heavyweight production companies as Guber-Peters to nab the dramatic rights to the life story of John Callahan, paralyzed from the chest down in an L.A. car accident in 1972 at age 21. Callahan overcame alcoholism 11 years ago and today is a syndicated cartoonist in Portland, Ore., sketching offbeat, sometimes mordant cartoons with his weakened right hand.
NEWS
May 9, 1985
A businessman was arrested on suspicion of deliberately setting a fire that caused $300,000 damage to a competitor's restaurant in Westwood, authorities said. Michael Shams, 31, owner of the Tanouri Restaurant, 1442 Westwood Blvd., was booked for investigation of arson in connection with a blaze at Shahrezad Persian Restaurant, 1422 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles Fire Department Capt. John Callahan said. Investigators found Shams at Harbor General-UCLA Medical Center, where he was being treated for burns.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|