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John Cameron Mitchell

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dislocation was a constant in the formative years of John Cameron Mitchell. As an Army brat--he was the son of a general--he moved repeatedly in the U.S. and Europe. Add to that a deep-seated sense he had since childhood of being different from those around him, of being a freak.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Chris Barton
John Cameron Mitchell's rock musical "Hedwig and the Angry Inch" is making a comeback. An off-Broadway hit that debuted in 1998 and became a cult film starring Mitchell in 2001, the rock musical is scheduled to return for a weeklong run at the Roxy Theatre Nov. 1-7. The play previously appeared at the Roxy in 2006 for a run that starred Donovon Leitch, and Leitch will reprise his lead role as Hedwig. The story of a heartbroken, East German-born glam rocker and victim of a botched sex change that gives the play its name, "Hedwig" became the test case musical for rock fans who claimed to not like musicals thanks to its infectious songs.
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NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On the set of his first movie, "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," future "Rabbit Hole" director John Cameron Mitchell was decked out in drag ? and running around the set barking orders at Teamsters. His father, then an Army major general, was visiting the set that day. "He told me, 'Oh, you're doing what I do,'" recalls Mitchell. On most sets, that's the truth: A director's vision may be one thing, but how he or she achieves it through managing cast, crew and a thousand other tiny details is another.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On the set of his first movie, "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," future "Rabbit Hole" director John Cameron Mitchell was decked out in drag ? and running around the set barking orders at Teamsters. His father, then an Army major general, was visiting the set that day. "He told me, 'Oh, you're doing what I do,'" recalls Mitchell. On most sets, that's the truth: A director's vision may be one thing, but how he or she achieves it through managing cast, crew and a thousand other tiny details is another.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elzbieta Czyzewska, the Polish film and stage star who provided the inspiration for Oscar-nominated Sally Kirkland's title role in "Anna" a few years back, has a leading role herself in Louis Yansen's "Misplaced" (Monica 4-Plex), a warm and incisive independent production of modest budget and impressive impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
"You're either on the bus, or you're off the bus" was a rallying cry of the '60s counterculture, and the same holds true in many ways for "Shortbus," the new film from writer-director John Cameron Mitchell, whose previous work was "Hedwig and the Angry Inch." In tracing the physical connections and spiritual-existential malaise of a group of post-Sept. 11 New Yorkers in their 20s and 30s, Mitchell's new film is full of sex -- real people having actual sex -- in various gender permutations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2012 | By Chris Barton
John Cameron Mitchell's rock musical "Hedwig and the Angry Inch" is making a comeback. An off-Broadway hit that debuted in 1998 and became a cult film starring Mitchell in 2001, the rock musical is scheduled to return for a weeklong run at the Roxy Theatre Nov. 1-7. The play previously appeared at the Roxy in 2006 for a run that starred Donovon Leitch, and Leitch will reprise his lead role as Hedwig. The story of a heartbroken, East German-born glam rocker and victim of a botched sex change that gives the play its name, "Hedwig" became the test case musical for rock fans who claimed to not like musicals thanks to its infectious songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2007 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
"Ilove you, I really . . . love you," the wan Brett Ratner look-alike unconvincingly testifies to his beautiful fiancee in the second episode of HBO's "Tell Me You Love Me." The couple progresses to some explicit sex that looks as if it might soon get pretty hot . . . until the woman breaks the mood mid-motion by demanding he admit he was flirting with a waitress earlier in the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
There's usually a film here that kicks up dust with boundary-pushing sexuality. In 2003, it was "The Brown Bunny," which included a graphic oral-sex scene that writer-director and star Vincent Gallo took great pains to tell everyone was real, not staged. This year's provocateur is "Shortbus." And it has everyone buzzing. In one scene, a man is lying in a tub of water making a video of his, um, privates.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the screen, the rip-roaring rock musical "Hedwig and the Angry Inch" retains all the excitement and energy it had on stage while adding depth, clarity and emotional texture. The result is a movie that absorbs its theatricality so smoothly and imaginatively that it never feels merely like a stage adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2007 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
"Ilove you, I really . . . love you," the wan Brett Ratner look-alike unconvincingly testifies to his beautiful fiancee in the second episode of HBO's "Tell Me You Love Me." The couple progresses to some explicit sex that looks as if it might soon get pretty hot . . . until the woman breaks the mood mid-motion by demanding he admit he was flirting with a waitress earlier in the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
"You're either on the bus, or you're off the bus" was a rallying cry of the '60s counterculture, and the same holds true in many ways for "Shortbus," the new film from writer-director John Cameron Mitchell, whose previous work was "Hedwig and the Angry Inch." In tracing the physical connections and spiritual-existential malaise of a group of post-Sept. 11 New Yorkers in their 20s and 30s, Mitchell's new film is full of sex -- real people having actual sex -- in various gender permutations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
There's usually a film here that kicks up dust with boundary-pushing sexuality. In 2003, it was "The Brown Bunny," which included a graphic oral-sex scene that writer-director and star Vincent Gallo took great pains to tell everyone was real, not staged. This year's provocateur is "Shortbus." And it has everyone buzzing. In one scene, a man is lying in a tub of water making a video of his, um, privates.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2001 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dislocation was a constant in the formative years of John Cameron Mitchell. As an Army brat--he was the son of a general--he moved repeatedly in the U.S. and Europe. Add to that a deep-seated sense he had since childhood of being different from those around him, of being a freak.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the screen, the rip-roaring rock musical "Hedwig and the Angry Inch" retains all the excitement and energy it had on stage while adding depth, clarity and emotional texture. The result is a movie that absorbs its theatricality so smoothly and imaginatively that it never feels merely like a stage adaptation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elzbieta Czyzewska, the Polish film and stage star who provided the inspiration for Oscar-nominated Sally Kirkland's title role in "Anna" a few years back, has a leading role herself in Louis Yansen's "Misplaced" (Monica 4-Plex), a warm and incisive independent production of modest budget and impressive impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2011
NIGHT LIFE New York City's infamous dance party Mattachine crashes La Cita, with director John Cameron Mitchell (himself no stranger to raucous music, he helmed "Hedwig and the Angry Inch") hosting and DJing. With performance artist Amber Martin. La Cita, 336 S. Hill St., L.A. 9 p.m. Sun. $3. (213) 687-7111.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Miles Teller almost died a few years ago. After spending a few days at a Connecticut music festival, he and two buddies were road tripping home to Florida. Cruising down the highway at 75 mph, Teller's friend tried to switch lanes and nearly hit another vehicle. He jerked the steering wheel back but lost control of the car, which went across three lanes of traffic, into a grass median, and flipped seven times. Teller was thrown 25 feet and awoke covered in blood. "I still have two rocks in my face," the boyish 23-year-old actor said, showing off scars on his chin, neck and shoulder.
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