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John Candy

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1994
As I was crossing the Mojave Desert, the radio report of John Candy's death was a bit overwhelming. I met him once, and he was a nice guy. The movie industry cannot afford to lose such quality comedians as the smiling Candy. As the desert road became longer, I remembered the thank-you card I wrote to him that I never mailed. I am a single father trying to raise four children. Entertainment is not an expense I can often afford. I often look for movies that will not offend or embarrass my family.
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NEWS
August 16, 1998 | Kevin Thomas
In an auspicious network movie debut, Kathleen Turner, in Friends at Last (KCBS Sunday at 9 p.m.), almost scratches her nails into the screen in an indelible portrayal of a loving wife starkly embittered by the shock of divorce. Susan Sandler's script for "Friends at Last," crucially set in the post-"Feminine Mystique" '60s and '70s, shines a stronger light on the nature of our divorce culture.
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NEWS
March 5, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Candy, the hefty comic who rose to fame in a series of slapstick films that brought smiles to the faces of studio financiers and shrieks of delight from his audiences, died Friday in Mexico, where he was filming. The star of "Uncle Buck," "Planes, Trains & Automobiles," "Stripes" and many other films was 43.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
A high-spirited mermaid fantasy and romantic comedy, with Tom Hanks (pictured) and John Candy drowned in the loveliness of fin-flipping Daryl Hannah (pictured). It's not as good as it seemed in 1984, but director Ron Howard and the actors give it a nice bright bounce and splash.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Candy was reportedly playing a hapless wagon master in the comedy Western "Wagons East" when he died suddenly Friday in Durango, Mexico, at age 43. The idea of Candy as wagon master is already enough to split your stitches. Candy was a great big bundle of comic exaggeration. Everything about his funniness was outsized--in his movies, and "SCTV" appearances, his appetite for victuals was matched by his appetite for grievance, babes and clamor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Writer-director Chris Columbus either values artistic integrity over star-power, or he's not quite as sharp as he looks. In both cases, he had the good fortune to have cast one of the most newly bankable, high-priced actors in Hollywood, young Macaulay Culkin, in a small part in his new film, "Only the Lonely"--only to virtually eliminate the $5-million kid from the movie's final edit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"The Great Outdoors" (citywide) is about as much fun as ants at a picnic for anyone over the age of 10. It's a crass, blah comedy about summer vacation perils that teams Dan Aykroyd and John Candy, but gives them next to nothing to work with. If the prolific and profit-making John Hughes weren't the writer--as well as the co-executive producer--of this scattershot nonsense directed frenetically by Howard Deutch, it's hard to imagine the film getting made, let alone attracting Aykroyd and Candy.
SPORTS
February 26, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Owner Bruce McNall and center Wayne Gretzky of the Kings and comedian John Candy, the new owners of the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League, have promised to turn the team into a high-profile, community-involved franchise. The three bought the team from Harry Ornest for $5 million.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
A high-spirited mermaid fantasy and romantic comedy, with Tom Hanks (pictured) and John Candy drowned in the loveliness of fin-flipping Daryl Hannah (pictured). It's not as good as it seemed in 1984, but director Ron Howard and the actors give it a nice bright bounce and splash.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John Candy will be remembered this season by the Toronto Argonauts, the CFL team he owned along with Wayne Gretzky and Bruce McNall. The team announced its players will wear embroidered gold crests in the shape of a Hollywood star with Candy's initials on their uniforms. The comedic actor, who became a part owner of the team in February 1991, died March 4 of a heart attack while filming a movie in Mexico. The Canada native was 43.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1994
As I was crossing the Mojave Desert, the radio report of John Candy's death was a bit overwhelming. I met him once, and he was a nice guy. The movie industry cannot afford to lose such quality comedians as the smiling Candy. As the desert road became longer, I remembered the thank-you card I wrote to him that I never mailed. I am a single father trying to raise four children. Entertainment is not an expense I can often afford. I often look for movies that will not offend or embarrass my family.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Candy, the hefty comic who rose to fame in a series of slapstick films that brought smiles to the faces of studio financiers and shrieks of delight from his audiences, died Friday in Mexico, where he was filming. The star of "Uncle Buck," "Planes, Trains & Automobiles," "Stripes" and many other films was 43.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1993
George Wendt, who played Norm on "Cheers," is starring in a TV movie for Fox that will be directed by John Candy. The comedy, which is being shot in Toronto, is called "Hostage for a Day" and features Wendt as a man who stages his own kidnaping to escape an unhappy marriage and unsatisfying job.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS
1985's The Goonies (NBC Sunday at 7 p.m.) is director Richard Donner's fast-paced childhood adventure about seven kids who burrow into the caves beneath a crumbling seaside restaurant in search of pirate treasure. Armed and Dangerous (CBS Saturday at 9:30 p.m.) is a terrible 1986 comedy that wastes John Candy and Eugene Levy, who have worked together since their "SCTV" days. SET YOUR VCR Body and Soul (KTTV Friday at 3 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Candy was reportedly playing a hapless wagon master in the comedy Western "Wagons East" when he died suddenly Friday in Durango, Mexico, at age 43. The idea of Candy as wagon master is already enough to split your stitches. Candy was a great big bundle of comic exaggeration. Everything about his funniness was outsized--in his movies, and "SCTV" appearances, his appetite for victuals was matched by his appetite for grievance, babes and clamor.
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