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SCIENCE
October 31, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
On Friday, only days after NASA tested its next big-ticket rocket, a ragtag group of space junkies in the Mojave Desert flew a bargain-basement rocket ship that could be the real future of spaceflight in the 21st century. Masten Space Systems sent its 10-foot-tall Xoie (pronounced Zoey) rocket soaring over a patch of scrub desert that stood in for the moon, a move that appeared to vault the company into the lead in the $2-million Northrop Grumman Lunar Lander Challenge. The contest is sponsored by NASA as part of its long-range effort to give a boost to private companies in the hope that they will someday take on such routine space tasks as delivering cargo to the International Space Station.
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SCIENCE
October 31, 2009 | John Johnson Jr.
On Friday, only days after NASA tested its next big-ticket rocket, a ragtag group of space junkies in the Mojave Desert flew a bargain-basement rocket ship that could be the real future of spaceflight in the 21st century. Masten Space Systems sent its 10-foot-tall Xoie (pronounced Zoey) rocket soaring over a patch of scrub desert that stood in for the moon, a move that appeared to vault the company into the lead in the $2-million Northrop Grumman Lunar Lander Challenge. The contest is sponsored by NASA as part of its long-range effort to give a boost to private companies in the hope that they will someday take on such routine space tasks as delivering cargo to the International Space Station.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 1999
TAKING WING: Far from being the ultimate indulgence, many businesses are finding that using private jets actually helps the bottom line, paying for themselves many times over. * COMING MONDAY CUTTING EDGE: The computer game industry is finding it must deal with new scrutiny. Software game maker John Carmack, above. * COMING TUESDAY WALL STREET, CALIFORNIA MONEY MAKE-OVER: A young couple who have made some financial missteps get advice on how to quickly boost savings.
SCIENCE
October 20, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Video game magnate-turned-space entrepreneur John Carmack predicted he would win at least one of two NASA-sponsored space prizes, following a successful test of his lunar lander model Thursday. "It went great," Carmack said after the 40-second flight over the southern New Mexico desert.
SCIENCE
October 23, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
NASA didn't have to write any checks at this year's X Prize Cup competition in Las Cruces, N.M., after judges decided Sunday not to honor any of the competitors in a $200,000 space elevator competition. Ben Shelef, an executive with the Spaceward Foundation that organized the competition, said the entry by the University of Saskatchewan climbed a 200-foot-high carbon fiber ribbon in just two seconds over the time allowed.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
LAS CRUCES, N.M. -- An attempt by video game designer-turned-rocketeer John Carmack to claim a NASA prize for designing a next-generation lunar lander ended in flames Saturday when Carmack's experimental craft crashed in the New Mexican desert. The liquid-oxygen-ethanol-powered craft plunged into the desert just after liftoff on the second leg of its flight, starting a small fire that was quickly doused, officials said.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2009 | Alex Pham
Id Software, creator of the Doom, Wolfenstein 3D and Quake games, has been sold to ZeniMax Media for an undisclosed amount. ZeniMax's Bethesda Softworks studio created the popular Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games. In a statement released Wednesday, ZeniMax said the development process at Id Software would remain untouched. Id will continue to operate as a studio under the direction of founder John Carmack. No changes will be made in the operations of Id's game development.
SCIENCE
October 22, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
John Carmack, legendary designer of the "Doom" and "Quake" computer game series, is head of Armadillo Aerospace of Mesquite, Texas. He is part of a new breed of space entrepreneurs trying to transform the dream of commercial spaceflight into a reality. Carmack, 36, took time to talk last week at the NASA-backed X Prize Cup Lunar Lander Challenges at Las Cruces International Airport in New Mexico. He has built two experimental moon landers, named Pixel and Texel. The X Prize is a series of space technology competitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2003 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
John Carmack and John Romero might not have the same name recognition as, say, Bill Gates or Steve Jobs, but they too are computer pioneers, well-known among video game devotees. That Americans spend more money on computer and video games than they spend on movie tickets is probably due, in large part, to the pair.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't long ago that John Carmack had given up on the Macintosh. The machine had too few users, it was too expensive for most people, and it was too slow for serious game players. Carmack's position was of more than casual interest to Apple Computer, the Macintosh's creator.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2002 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the going gets tough, the tough play games. With the semiconductor industry in the doldrums, chip makers Intel Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. are coaxing game developers to churn out bigger, faster games to give consumers a reason to run out and buy new computers. Intel and AMD always have helped software developers create programs that can soak up microprocessor power, but they recently have picked up the pace with game geeks. The reason: U.S.
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