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John Carr

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NEWS
April 1, 1989 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Alarmed by large withdrawals of deposits, federal banking regulators Friday seized control of financially ailing Gibraltar Savings, one of California's largest and oldest thrifts, and removed James N. Thayer as its chief executive. The move was part of the U.S. government's continuing effort to clamp down on insolvent and undercapitalized savings and loans across the country.
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BUSINESS
October 21, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
(Warning: Episode 4 spoilers ahead!) A few minutes into the pivotal scene in Sunday's "Homeland" between Carrie Mathison and the mysterious lawyer for the Iranians, I turned to my wife and said: "She's setting him up. "  I don't claim any powers of clairvoyance or any special skills at dramaturgy. But I am a fan of "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold," the 1963 novel that made  John le Carré a household name . And this narrative twist comes right out of that book. Readers of "The Spy" will remember that the title character, Alec Leamas, goes utterly to seed to smoke out a Soviet espionage recruiter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2011 | Kate Mather
Despite heated protest from residents and community groups in tony Hancock Park, Los Angeles officials this month approved plans to build a 6-foot fence along two sides of Getty House, the mayor's official residence. The fence, which would be taller than what zoning codes allow, was proposed by the Los Angeles Police Department after the Department of Homeland Security found that Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's home was at high risk of a security breach and needed to be fortified.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Richard Rayner
John le Carré's novels have responded brilliantly to the absence of the Cold War, which was, from 1963's classic "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold" to "The Secret Pilgrim" in 1990, their traditional domain. In one sense, though, whether set before or after the crumbling of the Berlin Wall, the subject of Le Carré's fiction has never changed. A theme always was, and remains, the question: How can the individual hope to take any effective action in the murk of politics? Le Carré's most famous (and best loved)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2000
John J. "Jack" Geoghegan, 82, book publisher who acquired John le Carre's landmark "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold." The 1963 novel from an unknown and pseudonymous British author (Le Carre's real name is David Cornwell) was offered to Geoghegan by a London literary agent as "an interesting thriller." Geoghegan had just assumed the presidency, and then the chairmanship, of the New York publishing company Coward-McCann and was looking for something well-written that would sell.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Those eager for "A Delicate Truth," the latest from spy master John le Carre, now have something to whet their appetites as they wait for his new novel's U.S. release on May 7.  Le Carre premiered a short film on his website Thursday in conjunction with the book's U.K. publication. The one-and-a-half minute teaser draws on the novel to deliver clues about the conspiracy at its heart.  There's little action, and no characters appear, but atmosphere and suspense are present in spades: a flashlight pans across a handwritten draft of the novel; a computer's screen saver bounces darkly around a screen; and a pigeon lifts off a branch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
This is Salman Rushdie's season of peacemaking. No, the great Indian British novelist hasn't forgiven the Iranian authorities who leveled a "Rushdie must die" fatwa against him back in 1989 for the perceived blasphemies in his novel "The Satanic Verses. " Nor has he made peace, as far as we know, with his second wife, Marianne Wiggins, who is the subject of a most unflattering portrait in Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton. " But in that same book Rushdie did, in effect, apologize at length to his third wife, Elizabeth West, for the poor judgment he showed in leaving her for his fourth wife, Padma Lakshmi, the statuesque beauty he first met under the Statue of Liberty.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
(Warning: Episode 4 spoilers ahead!) A few minutes into the pivotal scene in Sunday's "Homeland" between Carrie Mathison and the mysterious lawyer for the Iranians, I turned to my wife and said: "She's setting him up. "  I don't claim any powers of clairvoyance or any special skills at dramaturgy. But I am a fan of "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold," the 1963 novel that made  John le Carré a household name . And this narrative twist comes right out of that book. Readers of "The Spy" will remember that the title character, Alec Leamas, goes utterly to seed to smoke out a Soviet espionage recruiter.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Richard Rayner
John le Carré's novels have responded brilliantly to the absence of the Cold War, which was, from 1963's classic "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold" to "The Secret Pilgrim" in 1990, their traditional domain. In one sense, though, whether set before or after the crumbling of the Berlin Wall, the subject of Le Carré's fiction has never changed. A theme always was, and remains, the question: How can the individual hope to take any effective action in the murk of politics? Le Carré's most famous (and best loved)
BOOKS
April 20, 1986 | Morton Kamins, Kamins is a free-lance writer and reviewer. and
It's no accident that Proust's name recurs often in this novel, for John le Carre stalks the biggest of literary game here and comes home with his trophy--the masterly welding of an intricate page-turning spy thriller with the infinitely complex exploration of time and a man's memory. "A Perfect Spy" is a great vibrant cornucopia, spilling over with "something for everyone"--indeed something magnificent for everyone--a permanent addition to the canon of English literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Those eager for "A Delicate Truth," the latest from spy master John le Carre, now have something to whet their appetites as they wait for his new novel's U.S. release on May 7.  Le Carre premiered a short film on his website Thursday in conjunction with the book's U.K. publication. The one-and-a-half minute teaser draws on the novel to deliver clues about the conspiracy at its heart.  There's little action, and no characters appear, but atmosphere and suspense are present in spades: a flashlight pans across a handwritten draft of the novel; a computer's screen saver bounces darkly around a screen; and a pigeon lifts off a branch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
Filmmakers Z.S. Grant and John Carr have spent the better part of the past year ricocheting around the country, capturing the stories of politically minded street artists for their documentary series, "Voice of Art. " Their eight-episode Web series - currently airing on rapper Pharrell Williams' YouTube channel, i am OTHER - is as cutting edge and iconoclastic as the neon bright cast of characters featured in it. Each 34-minute episode is...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
This is Salman Rushdie's season of peacemaking. No, the great Indian British novelist hasn't forgiven the Iranian authorities who leveled a "Rushdie must die" fatwa against him back in 1989 for the perceived blasphemies in his novel "The Satanic Verses. " Nor has he made peace, as far as we know, with his second wife, Marianne Wiggins, who is the subject of a most unflattering portrait in Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton. " But in that same book Rushdie did, in effect, apologize at length to his third wife, Elizabeth West, for the poor judgment he showed in leaving her for his fourth wife, Padma Lakshmi, the statuesque beauty he first met under the Statue of Liberty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2011 | Kate Mather
Despite heated protest from residents and community groups in tony Hancock Park, Los Angeles officials this month approved plans to build a 6-foot fence along two sides of Getty House, the mayor's official residence. The fence, which would be taller than what zoning codes allow, was proposed by the Los Angeles Police Department after the Department of Homeland Security found that Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's home was at high risk of a security breach and needed to be fortified.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
THE FIRST recognizable English-language novels of espionage were published in the first decade of the 20th century -- and both have been continuously in print ever since. Rudyard Kipling's "Kim" came out in 1901, and Erskine Childers' "The Riddle of the Sands" followed two years later. You still can get a fairly spirited argument over which actually is the first true spy novel.
BOOKS
September 17, 2006 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of many books, including "Elia Kazan: A Biography" and "The Essential Chaplin."
BRUNO SALVADOR (known to one and all as "Salvo") is a young translator, working in London for a variety of masters -- lawyers, doctors and (how can it be otherwise, since he's the creation of John Le Carre?) a secret branch of the British government. He is, however, no ordinary linguistic mediator. He has what amounts to a genius for his craft, a mastery not just of the major languages of his native land, the Eastern Congo, but most of its tribal tongues as well.
BOOKS
January 14, 2001 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber writes the L.A. Confidential column for Book Review and is the author, most recently, of "Apocalypses."
Beautiful, young, wealthy, well-educated, Tessa Quayle is a crusader, the selflessly dedicated defender of those who cannot defend themselves, "that rarest thing: a lawyer who believes in justice." She is also an infuriating zealot, a royal nuisance, a pain in the neck of the vested interests that she assails in her heedless campaigns against iniquity, insensitivity and malfeasance. Tessa is horribly murdered in the opening pages of John le Carre's latest [im]morality tale.
BOOKS
September 17, 2006 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of many books, including "Elia Kazan: A Biography" and "The Essential Chaplin."
BRUNO SALVADOR (known to one and all as "Salvo") is a young translator, working in London for a variety of masters -- lawyers, doctors and (how can it be otherwise, since he's the creation of John Le Carre?) a secret branch of the British government. He is, however, no ordinary linguistic mediator. He has what amounts to a genius for his craft, a mastery not just of the major languages of his native land, the Eastern Congo, but most of its tribal tongues as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2001 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's a ruthless spy and a pathological liar to do in a post-Cold War world where none of the old rules apply and everything's up for grabs? Why, team up and turn the espionage game into the ultimate con and walk away with a fortune, of course. At least that's what Pierce Brosnan and Geoffrey Rush try to do in "The Tailor of Panama," the John Boorman film that opened last weekend to strong business in limited release ($1.8 million on 199 screens).
BOOKS
January 14, 2001 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber writes the L.A. Confidential column for Book Review and is the author, most recently, of "Apocalypses."
Beautiful, young, wealthy, well-educated, Tessa Quayle is a crusader, the selflessly dedicated defender of those who cannot defend themselves, "that rarest thing: a lawyer who believes in justice." She is also an infuriating zealot, a royal nuisance, a pain in the neck of the vested interests that she assails in her heedless campaigns against iniquity, insensitivity and malfeasance. Tessa is horribly murdered in the opening pages of John le Carre's latest [im]morality tale.
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