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January 29, 1989 | SUSAN REITER
"Film is like a language," says John Carrafa, who created substantial dance segments for two upcoming major films. "Once I had figured out what the rules were, I started to be able to speak it. Eventually you start thinking in that language." A leading dancer with Twyla Tharp from 1978 to 1987, Carrafa has choreographed sequences in "Sing" (Tri-Star Pictures) and "Rooftops" (New Visions) that help delineate youthful characters in tough, urban settings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2004 | Associated Press
Surf's up! "Good Vibrations," a new musical using more than 30 Beach Boys songs, will open on Broadway in January. The show will begin preview performances in early December at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre. An opening date will be announced shortly. "Good Vibrations" has a book by Richard Dresser and concerns a group of small-town teens who come to Southern California.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2004 | Associated Press
Surf's up! "Good Vibrations," a new musical using more than 30 Beach Boys songs, will open on Broadway in January. The show will begin preview performances in early December at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre. An opening date will be announced shortly. "Good Vibrations" has a book by Richard Dresser and concerns a group of small-town teens who come to Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1989 | SUSAN REITER
"Film is like a language," says John Carrafa, who created substantial dance segments for two upcoming major films. "Once I had figured out what the rules were, I started to be able to speak it. Eventually you start thinking in that language." A leading dancer with Twyla Tharp from 1978 to 1987, Carrafa has choreographed sequences in "Sing" (Tri-Star Pictures) and "Rooftops" (New Visions) that help delineate youthful characters in tough, urban settings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Robert Wise's "Rooftops" (citywide), a vibrant romantic fable, takes us into Manhattan's Alphabet City, that section of derelict Beaux Arts apartment buildings lining Avenues A, B, C and D and their cross streets on the Lower East Side. It is an area inhabited mainly by impoverished minorities, and it is menaced by drug traffic (and also by gentrification, but that's not part of this movie).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1989 | JULIE WHEELOCK
Dancer-choreographer Katherine LaNasa Hopper is relaxing in her Frank Gehry-designed home in Venice, describing the choreography for her first theater piece, "Rocking This Ship." The work for six dancers is part of a concert by Collage Dance Theatre this weekend at the Skylight Theatre in Hollywood--although without Hopper, who is scheduled to dance in "The Nutcracker" with Columbia City Ballet in South Carolina.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"I love you, but you don't love me. I would like to kill you, but I can't so I will hurt you instead." In the land of "Love! Valour! Compassion!," Terrence McNally's paean to friendship and love in the shadow of illness, eight male friends each know precisely what they're feeling and why they're feeling it, always. Trading off narration like a baton, the friends are staying at a country house on a series of holiday weekends.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Mae West said it's better to be looked over than overlooked. Claudia Shear's scintillating play "Dirty Blonde," which is ostensibly about West, examines a couple of her otherwise overlooked fans as much as it looks over the star herself. That's one reason why it's better than most stage treatments of screen stars. Most people probably feel that they belong in the "overlooked" category. At the Pasadena Playhouse, they get to vicariously share the spotlight with West.
NEWS
May 13, 2004 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
It looks like an Expressionist painting and sounds like a Bertolt Brecht-Kurt Weill musical. It grapples with gritty social issues, thumbs its nose at sentiment and goes by a name that makes people crinkle their noses in distaste. It is, in short, improbably entertaining. Welcome to "Urinetown," the little musical that, against all odds, rose to Broadway (where it won Tony Awards for book, score and director) and a national tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2003 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Mae West was every mother's nightmare and every man's dream. Voluptuous, brazenly blond and fond of risque double-entendres, she shocked polite society but appealed to untold numbers of women who wanted to be like her and men who just wanted her. Every time she said something like, "When women go wrong, men go right after them," she put a little dent in America's armor of prudery.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I wish." These restless words are at the beginning and the end of "Into the Woods," the wise and witty musical by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine. Even after "Into the Woods" opened on Broadway in 1987, wishes kept cropping up in Lapine's mind, as the librettist and director thought about the show. His wishing led to an altered version of "Into the Woods," now at the Ahmanson Theatre, with changes in the staging and design and a few slightly modified lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL
Broadway musicals based on movies are nothing unusual, but the recent crop of shows adapted from classic Hollywood dance musicals represent a strange, new breed of crypto-revival. Because the dance numbers in the original films are so familiar, audiences at such shows as Gower Champion's "42nd Street" and Twyla Tharp's "Singin' in the Rain" (bothcurrently running in New York) experience an eerie sense of double vision.
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