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John Cashen

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NEWS
February 26, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last two decades, John Cashen has played a pivotal role in creating the top-secret Stealth technology that makes planes and missiles invisible to enemy radar. But last Friday, he quit his job as chief scientist at Northrop Corp.'s B-2 bomber plant in Pico Rivera and moved to Australia to work at a government defense laboratory. Cashen, a brilliant and eccentric engineer known to colleagues as "Dr.
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NEWS
February 26, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last two decades, John Cashen has played a pivotal role in creating the top-secret Stealth technology that makes planes and missiles invisible to enemy radar. But last Friday, he quit his job as chief scientist at Northrop Corp.'s B-2 bomber plant in Pico Rivera and moved to Australia to work at a government defense laboratory. Cashen, a brilliant and eccentric engineer known to colleagues as "Dr.
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NEWS
May 2, 1985
John F. Cashen, vice president of advanced engineering and technology for Northrup Corp., was honored as the 1985 Engineering Alumnus of the Year at the annual recognition dinner staged by the UCLA School of Engineering and Applied Science. Cashen received his master's degree in electrical engineering from UCLA in 1967 and his Ph.D. in 1971.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aircraft designer Burt Rutan rolled out and demonstrated his latest creation Monday--an experimental jet fighter with such potential missions as shooting down enemy helicopters or drug-laden cargo planes. The aircraft was not paid for by the Pentagon and its design was not dictated by the military, explaining why it defies many of the government's most important conventions such as complexity, high cost and big bureaucracy.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acclaimed aircraft designer Burt Rutan said Wednesday that he is sick of "the lousy schools, crime, drugs, graffiti and proliferation of lawyers" in California and has decided to move his small Mojave firm, Scaled Composites Inc., to another state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
With a martini in hand, John Cashen was deep in a discussion of military electronics, when a 747 jetliner seemed to float past in slow motion onto LAX's south runway complex. Cashen, who pioneered the radar-evading design of the B-2 Stealth bomber, stopped to watch the plane - just a few hundred yards away - thunder past his table at the Proud Bird, the aerospace industry's favorite watering hole for more than a half-century. "There's no place else like this in the world," said Cashen, 76, who retired from Northrop Grumman in 1993 but still consults for the firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
When Thomas V. Jones took control of Northrop Corp. in 1960, it was a secondary aerospace company whose future was uncertain, but the legendary gambles Jones made over the next 30 years swept the company to the top ranks of the defense industry during the Cold War. Jones came from an era when the chiefs of U.S. aerospace companies laid huge bets on future projects, and over an extraordinary three-decade tenure as Northrop's chief executive he...
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Boeing Co. needed a wind tunnel recently to test the design of its new 777 passenger jet, the company sent its top-secret airplane model to a research facility operated by the Royal Aerospace Establishment in Britain. The nation's premier aircraft builder was forced abroad because the National Aeronautics and Space Administration had shut down the decrepit wind tunnel in Sunnyvale, about 40 miles south of San Francisco, that the company would otherwise have used.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A kite-shaped aircraft with smooth silver skin--easily mistaken for an alien space vehicle--was parked last week inside an El Segundo hangar that resembled a sterile operating room. From behind a glass-encased observation room, aerospace engineer David Mazur explained that the craft was actually a demonstration model for a military aircraft that he really couldn't say much about. Little, too, has been said about Northrop Grumman Corp.'
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