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John Cassavetes

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
John Cassavetes' name has become a kind of shorthand over the years. Filmmakers and critics tend to invoke it whenever hand-held close-ups zero in on characters who are drunk, distraught, dissembling, divulging their innermost fears or all of the above. What's missing from many such interpretations of so-called Cassavetian cinema is an appreciation of the singular compassion and acuity of a visionary. In the quarter-century since his death at 59, Cassavetes' uncategorizable work has lost none of its breathtaking intensity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
John Cassavetes' name has become a kind of shorthand over the years. Filmmakers and critics tend to invoke it whenever hand-held close-ups zero in on characters who are drunk, distraught, dissembling, divulging their innermost fears or all of the above. What's missing from many such interpretations of so-called Cassavetian cinema is an appreciation of the singular compassion and acuity of a visionary. In the quarter-century since his death at 59, Cassavetes' uncategorizable work has lost none of its breathtaking intensity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Independence is a crucial part of the legend of John Cassavetes, the original Method actor turned DIY filmmaker. For that reason his early forays into studio directing - he made 1961's "Too Late Blues" for Paramount and 1963's Stanley Kramer-produced "A Child Is Waiting" for United Artists - are usually thought of as footnotes at best, or compromised failures at worst (a view that has been ascribed to Cassavetes himself). But even in these minor works, the Cassavetes touch - the delicate way of handling emotional messiness, the tough but ultimately generous view of human behavior - is unmistakable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Renowned French director Agnes Varda, who was named this month as the guest artistic director of the AFI Fest 2013, has selected a program of four eclectic movies to be screened at the festival, which runs Nov. 7-14 in Hollywood.  The 85-year-old Varda, who directed her first feature, "La Pointe Courte," in 1955, has chosen films that have inspired her over the last six decades: Robert Bresson's acclaimed 1959 drama "Pickpocket"; John Cassavetes' 1974...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
John Cassavetes, the innovative film maker deeply admired by some but scorned by others for such off-center movies as "A Woman Under the Influence" and "Faces," died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 59. Actress Gena Rowlands, to whom he had been married since 1958 and who had starred in most of his films, was with him when he died about 10 a.m., said his publicist, Esme Chandlee. Chandlee said Cassavetes died from complications of cirrhosis of the liver.
NEWS
March 17, 2005 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
When I first read about the John Cassavetes retrospective, I couldn't wait for the chance to watch a collection of rarely seen TV programs -- many of them shot live -- from his youthful acting days. I arrived early for the screening, at the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills, anticipating a crowd of fans. Alas, my view was undisturbed for aisles. By the time the show started, four other people had turned up. Where were the aspiring actors, directors and hipster cineastes?
NEWS
January 13, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
John Cassavetes was a staple on live television in the 1950s, long before he became the director of such seminal film classics as "Shadows," "Faces" and "A Woman Under the Influence" and an award-winning movie star ("The Dirty Dozen," "Rosemary's Baby"). And even after the acclaim, he would continue to appear on the small screen well into the 1970s. But his influential films have long overshadowed his television work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Turn That Damned Thing Off!," a survey of the amusing, tantalizing--and sometimes merely obscure--ways in which experimental film makers have made use of television over the decades, will be presented by Filmforum tonight at 8 at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Independence is a crucial part of the legend of John Cassavetes, the original Method actor turned DIY filmmaker. For that reason his early forays into studio directing - he made 1961's "Too Late Blues" for Paramount and 1963's Stanley Kramer-produced "A Child Is Waiting" for United Artists - are usually thought of as footnotes at best, or compromised failures at worst (a view that has been ascribed to Cassavetes himself). But even in these minor works, the Cassavetes touch - the delicate way of handling emotional messiness, the tough but ultimately generous view of human behavior - is unmistakable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2012 | Dennis McLellan
A New York native of Sicilian heritage, Ben Gazzara was a strongly masculine, subtly menacing screen presence with a gravelly voice that one writer described as "saloon-cured" and another said could strip paint at 50 paces. The veteran actor, who died Friday in New York City, found fame on Broadway in the 1950s, starred in the TV series "Run for Your Life" in the 1960s and was closely identified on the big screen with independent filmmaker John Cassavetes. The cause of death was pancreatic cancer, said his attorney Jay I. Julien.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Peter Falk, the gravel-voiced actor who became an enduring television icon portraying Lt. Columbo, the rumpled raincoat-wearing Los Angeles police homicide detective who always had "just one more thing" to ask a suspect, died Thursday. He was 83. Falk, who reportedly suffered from dementia, died at his home in Beverly Hills, according to a statement from Larry Larson, a friend and an attorney for Falk's wife, Shera. In a more than 50-year acting career that spanned Broadway, movies and television, Falk appeared in more than 50 feature films, including "A Woman Under the Influence," "Husbands," "Luv," "Mikey and Nicky," "The In-Laws," "Wings of Desire," "The Great Race," "The Cheap Detective," "Cookie" and "The Princess Bride.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2009 | Mark Olsen
Actor Seymour Cassel had just tucked himself into a booth at Hollywood's venerable Musso & Frank Grill when he was reminded of an interview he did in the same spot for Rolling Stone magazine in 1972, alongside John Cassavetes, the iconic filmmaker with whom he is most closely associated. Like the restaurant, Cassel, now 74, may be older but seems remarkably unchanged. His unpredictable, live-wire energy, such a trademark from his roles for Cassavetes, was going full throttle. Cassel, who came to Hollywood in 1961, has a way with an anecdote and can drop some pretty impressive names -- there was the time, for example, when he introduced Charles Bukowski to Johnny Cash at Barney's Beanery -- and he manages to make it all sound plausible.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009 | Dennis Lim
After his death last September, Paul Newman received any number of tributes -- for his acting and his humanitarian efforts. Less remembered, and somewhat neglected throughout his career, was his work as a filmmaker. Newman, who majored in directing at the Yale Drama School, ventured behind the camera only on occasion -- he directed six films from the late '60s to the late '80s, most of them starring his wife, Joanne Woodward. John Cassavetes and Clint Eastwood notwithstanding, the figure of the actor-turned-director often conjures up the dreaded notion of the vanity project.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The versatility of Ulrich Mühe -- one of Germany's leading actors, who died last month of stomach cancer -- is on display in two movies being released on DVD today: "The Lives of Others" and "The Castle."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989
Sheila Benson speaks eloquently of John Cassavetes, who died Feb. 3 ("Cassavetes Left His Imprint on a Generation of Film Makers," Feb. 6). Fortunately for future generations, John's art was films. He will remain alive as long as there are audiences willing to look, listen and learn. A footnote to Benson's moving memorial: Cassavetes was trusting and generous and shared his gifts with others freely, with often unexpected results. For a novice director it seemed an impossible dream that John Cassavetes would star in my first film, a short comedy about a man getting a haircut.
NEWS
June 21, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
IT was inevitable that Zoe Cassavetes would enter the family business. After all, her father was actor-director John Cassavetes, one of the pioneers of the indie film movement. Her mom is award-winning actress Gena Rowlands, who was her husband's muse in the majority of his films. And her older siblings, Nick and Xan, have also established themselves as directors. "It never occurred to me not to do it," Zoe Cassavetes said. "The set was our house. It was such a fun atmosphere.
NEWS
March 17, 2005 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
When I first read about the John Cassavetes retrospective, I couldn't wait for the chance to watch a collection of rarely seen TV programs -- many of them shot live -- from his youthful acting days. I arrived early for the screening, at the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills, anticipating a crowd of fans. Alas, my view was undisturbed for aisles. By the time the show started, four other people had turned up. Where were the aspiring actors, directors and hipster cineastes?
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