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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Mention the good old days of television news and you risk sounding as musty as a gnarled old man who sits on a park bench muttering to passersby that no one could hit a baseball quite like Ty Cobb. But here goes. No one could earn your respect quite like John Chancellor. Last week, Chancellor retired from NBC News, where he had been since 1950, except for a stint as Voice of America director in the Johnson Administration. That amounts to 43 years in the news business.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2006 | Jim Newton, Times Staff Writer
Henry Weinstein, one of The Times' most respected journalists, has been named winner of the John Chancellor Award for Excellence, which recognizes a body of work marked by "courage, integrity, curiosity and intelligence." Weinstein will be honored at a black-tie dinner Tuesday night in New York City. The prize is awarded annually to a single journalist and is administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
John Chancellor, a mainstay at NBC News for more than 40 years, plans to retire sometime next year, the network confirmed Thursday. He turns 65 next month. The last of the commentators on any of the three major networks' nightly newscasts, Chancellor will continue appearing on "NBC Nightly News With Tom Brokaw" a few months beyond the presidential inauguration in January, a network spokeswoman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1996 | RICK DU BROW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He was the quiet man. In 43 years with NBC News, John Chancellor, who died Friday at 68, had seen it all and done it all, but he never flaunted it on-screen. He certainly knew all the tricks of the trade but never seemed interested in being a hotshot personality. He was lousy fodder for the gossip columns. Instead, he came across like a friendly teacher. Thus did he win the nation's trust as a reporter, anchor and commentator. His trademarks were understatement, intelligence--and a twinkle.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | SUSAN KING
John Chancellor, NBC's senior political analyst, was 33 when he covered the 1960 presidential campaigns of John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon for NBC. Thirty years later, he's hosting and narrating the Arts & Entertainment Network's "Campaign U60," a series of special programs this month that will follow the crucial events of the Kennedy-Nixon election. The series kicks off with "The 1960 Democratic National Convention," airing Wednesday at 6 and 10 p.m.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Chancellor, the venerated stalwart of NBC television news for 43 years who intoned the world's daily happenings from an anchor chair, then moved on to analyze and interpret events as the last network commentator, died Friday. He was 68. Chancellor, who had been ill with stomach cancer, died at his home in Princeton, N. J. "He was unique," former CBS News anchorman Walter Cronkite told CNN Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Chancellor's Back: John Chancellor, commentator for "NBC Nightly News," has recovered from heart surgery and will return to the program Wednesday, NBC announced Monday. Chancellor, 62, who underwent double-bypass surgery in late June, will make weekly appearances through September, an NBC spokeswoman said. Chancellor, who began working at NBC in 1950, will resume his normal schedule Oct. 2, with commentaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | From Times staff and wire service reports
NBC Nightly News commentator John Chancellor erroneously referred to former Gov. George C. Wallace as "the late governor," but that didn't bother Wallace, his spokesman said Wednesday. "Newsmen have been making mistakes about George Wallace all of his life," said spokesman Elvin Stanton. "It's something he brushes off." During Chancellor's commentary Tuesday night, he quoted Wallace as once saying governors were nothing more than "ornaments."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1996 | RICK DU BROW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He was the quiet man. In 43 years with NBC News, John Chancellor, who died Friday at 68, had seen it all and done it all, but he never flaunted it on-screen. He certainly knew all the tricks of the trade but never seemed interested in being a hotshot personality. He was lousy fodder for the gossip columns. Instead, he came across like a friendly teacher. Thus did he win the nation's trust as a reporter, anchor and commentator. His trademarks were understatement, intelligence--and a twinkle.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | GARY KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chancellor McCobb was named after veteran television broadcaster John Chancellor. Perhaps that explains why the Cal Poly Pomona senior has become so adept at calmly handling and making sense of bad news. Like his namesake, Chancellor McCobb has a way of putting things into perspective. McCobb, for example, was disappointed when his transcripts from Ontario High sent once-attentive Division I basketball recruiters into hiding. McCobb refused to whine.
NEWS
July 13, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Chancellor, the venerated stalwart of NBC television news for 43 years who intoned the world's daily happenings from an anchor chair, then moved on to analyze and interpret events as the last network commentator, died Friday. He was 68. Chancellor, who had been ill with stomach cancer, died at his home in Princeton, N. J. "He was unique," former CBS News anchorman Walter Cronkite told CNN Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Mention the good old days of television news and you risk sounding as musty as a gnarled old man who sits on a park bench muttering to passersby that no one could hit a baseball quite like Ty Cobb. But here goes. No one could earn your respect quite like John Chancellor. Last week, Chancellor retired from NBC News, where he had been since 1950, except for a stint as Voice of America director in the Johnson Administration. That amounts to 43 years in the news business.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1992 | RICK DU BROW
The grand era of commentary on nightly network TV news is long gone, but this week's NBC confirmation of John Chancellor's coming departure seemed to make it official. A significant field once populated by the likes of Eric Sevareid, Howard K. Smith, David Brinkley, Bill Moyers and Chancellor, it now is virtually deserted, robbing the Big Three networks of yet another arena that distinguished them from the pack.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
John Chancellor, a mainstay at NBC News for more than 40 years, plans to retire sometime next year, the network confirmed Thursday. He turns 65 next month. The last of the commentators on any of the three major networks' nightly newscasts, Chancellor will continue appearing on "NBC Nightly News With Tom Brokaw" a few months beyond the presidential inauguration in January, a network spokeswoman said.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | GARY KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chancellor McCobb was named after veteran television broadcaster John Chancellor. Perhaps that explains why the Cal Poly Pomona senior has become so adept at calmly handling and making sense of bad news. Like his namesake, Chancellor McCobb has a way of putting things into perspective. McCobb, for example, was disappointed when his transcripts from Ontario High sent once-attentive Division I basketball recruiters into hiding. McCobb refused to whine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Chancellor's Back: John Chancellor, commentator for "NBC Nightly News," has recovered from heart surgery and will return to the program Wednesday, NBC announced Monday. Chancellor, 62, who underwent double-bypass surgery in late June, will make weekly appearances through September, an NBC spokeswoman said. Chancellor, who began working at NBC in 1950, will resume his normal schedule Oct. 2, with commentaries on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | MIKE SPENCER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Average Americans have a luxury journalists don't possess--that of ignoring current events that might offend their sensibilities--anything from particularly ugly crimes to the plight of the homeless. They can skip right to the comics and pretend that whatever happened simply didn't. Journalists' livelihoods, on the other hand, mandate a heartbeat-away intimacy that can prove jarring and agonizing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1985 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
John Chancellor came to town this week to discreetly drumbeat for "Portrait of the Press, Warts and All," his NBC News documentary airing Saturday. But during 50 minutes with visiting members of the press, he also: --Said he was "disturbed, deeply" that the Public Broadcasting Service soon will air a program that focuses on complaints by a politically conservative media watchdog group, Accuracy in Media, about PBS's "Vietnam: A Television History" series broadcast in 1983.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | SUSAN KING
John Chancellor, NBC's senior political analyst, was 33 when he covered the 1960 presidential campaigns of John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon for NBC. Thirty years later, he's hosting and narrating the Arts & Entertainment Network's "Campaign U60," a series of special programs this month that will follow the crucial events of the Kennedy-Nixon election. The series kicks off with "The 1960 Democratic National Convention," airing Wednesday at 6 and 10 p.m.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | MIKE SPENCER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Average Americans have a luxury journalists don't possess--that of ignoring current events that might offend their sensibilities--anything from particularly ugly crimes to the plight of the homeless. They can skip right to the comics and pretend that whatever happened simply didn't. Journalists' livelihoods, on the other hand, mandate a heartbeat-away intimacy that can prove jarring and agonizing.
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