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NEWS
February 7, 1993
Many thanks for Beverly Beyette's "Around Town" column on John Charles Thomas (Jan. 20). It brought back memories of his radio concerts with Marguerite Daum at the Masonic Temple in Detroit in the late '30s. Free tickets were given on request and my girlfriend and I were there frequently, feeling privileged at a concert of this quality that we never could have afforded. I shall look forward to the upcoming CD. DOROTHY PRIME Northridge
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996
Daniel Cariaga generously called attention to the only person I know who locally sounded a fanfare to the late and great baritone Lawrence Tibbett on his 100th birthday: Los Angeles vocal musicologist and lecturer William R. Osteck ("The Baritone Time Didn't Forget," Oct. 27). Throughout the year Osteck has repeatedly performed his lecture on Tibbett. Widely acknowledged as a Keeper of the Sacred Baritonial Flame, Osteck is a popular speaker on both Tibbett and his sturdy-voiced contemporary, the late John Charles Thomas.
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NEWS
August 30, 1992 | MIKE WARD
The baritone voice of John Charles Thomas was familiar to radio listeners across the nation 50 years ago, but his fame had faded by his death in 1960. The centenary of his birth passed last year with little notice, disappointing a friend, William R. Osteck, who had hoped it would be the occasion for the reissue of some of Thomas' recordings of such songs as "Home on the Range" and "The Lord's Prayer."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996
Daniel Cariaga generously called attention to the only person I know who locally sounded a fanfare to the late and great baritone Lawrence Tibbett on his 100th birthday: Los Angeles vocal musicologist and lecturer William R. Osteck ("The Baritone Time Didn't Forget," Oct. 27). Throughout the year Osteck has repeatedly performed his lecture on Tibbett. Widely acknowledged as a Keeper of the Sacred Baritonial Flame, Osteck is a popular speaker on both Tibbett and his sturdy-voiced contemporary, the late John Charles Thomas.
NEWS
March 11, 1993 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earl Wrightson, the bearded baritone who became a major player in the American musical theater if not one of its superstars, has died at his Long Island home. Lois Hunt, his companion and most recent singing partner, said he was 77 and died Sunday of heart failure. For 50 years, Wrightson was heard on radio, seen on television and applauded in the nation's concert halls.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
The voice--a rich, deep baritone--filled the room. The song? "The Song Is You." The singer? John Charles Thomas. John Charles who? Alas, Thomas, who died 32 years ago in Apple Valley, is not exactly a Pavarotti, Domingo or Carreras. (Elizabeth Schaaf, archivist at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore--to which Thomas' widow Dorothy gave his paper and music library--reports a step toward correcting this situation: Out-of-print Victor Red Seal recordings have just been released on CD by Nimbus.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Here it is Jan. 2 already--the first day of the rest of the year--and William Osteck and Norman Fleishman are, in their own ways, still determined to wind up some unfinished show business this year. The two Los Angeles men don't know each other and operate separately in spheres of their own. They are offered up here because in their ways they are parts of a frequently ignored side of the entertainment industry. They are collectors of a sort. Fans. Admirers. Dreamers. Activists, too.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Antonia Brico, the formidable maestra who invaded the male-dominated world of symphonic conducting nearly 60 years ago but then was forced to leave it because of the rampant sexism of that day, has died in a Denver nursing home. The Associated Press reported Friday that the first woman to conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic (Aug. 1, 1930) and several other major symphony orchestras died Thursday.
NEWS
February 7, 1993
Many thanks for Beverly Beyette's "Around Town" column on John Charles Thomas (Jan. 20). It brought back memories of his radio concerts with Marguerite Daum at the Masonic Temple in Detroit in the late '30s. Free tickets were given on request and my girlfriend and I were there frequently, feeling privileged at a concert of this quality that we never could have afforded. I shall look forward to the upcoming CD. DOROTHY PRIME Northridge
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | MIKE WARD
The baritone voice of John Charles Thomas was familiar to radio listeners across the nation 50 years ago, but his fame had faded by his death in 1960. The centenary of his birth passed last year with little notice, disappointing a friend, William R. Osteck, who had hoped it would be the occasion for the reissue of some of Thomas' recordings of such songs as "Home on the Range" and "The Lord's Prayer."
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Glenhall Taylor, radio historian and pioneer radio writer, announcer, producer and director of such shows as "Burns and Allen" and "Ozzie and Harriet," has died. He was 94. Taylor died of pneumonia Dec. 28 in Wilcox Hospital in Kauai, Hawaii, said his son, retired Bank of America executive Glenhall Taylor Jr. The senior Taylor produced or directed hundreds of radio programs broadcast nationally from Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Informed opera lovers approached Royce Hall, UCLA, with some trepidation Saturday night. Sherrill Milnes was giving a recital. Normally, that would be cause for happy anticipation. Milnes is the latest--and, perhaps, the last--in a line of great American baritones. That lofty line began with Lawrence Tibbett and John Charles Thomas in the 1920s, and continued rapturously with Leonard Warren, Robert Weede and Robert Merrill.
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