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John Cheever

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July 17, 1988 | James Salter, Salter's "Dusk and Other Stories" (North Point Press) was published in April
At a dinner party in Westchester one evening in the 1960s, the beautifully gowned woman next to John Cheever asked, "What is it you do, John?" "I'm a writer," he admitted. "How interesting," she said. "What do you write?" "Oh, stories mostly." "Well," she said, "I'm sorry, but I only read the New Yorker." That was one of the difficulties--he was born known and unknown, taken seriously or not taken at all. He was, pre-eminently, a New Yorker writer.
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April 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Mary Cheever, an accomplished author and poet best known as the enduring spouse and widow of John Cheever, has died, after surviving by decades a husband who used their lonely but lasting marriage as an inspiration for some of his most memorable stories. She was 95. She had been battling pneumonia and died Monday night at her colonial-style manor in Ossining, N.Y., her daughter, Susan Cheever , said. The home served as a well-publicized backdrop to John Cheever's facade as the gentleman scribe of "The Swimmer" and "The Five-Forty-Eight.
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BOOKS
October 13, 1991 | RICHARD EDER
In his later years, and looking back over his work, John Cheever wrote that his stories expressed "My feeling of life as intense and profoundly broken encounters." So do these intense and profoundly broken journals. Stretching over the last half of his life, they are a train ride through scenery that is bright and dark by turns, but always infected by the terrors of the journey and the destination.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Jasmine Elist
In F. Scott Fitzgerald's second novel, “The Beautiful and Damned,” he referred to alcohol as “the rose colored glasses of life.” When taking a close look at the lives of America's greatest authors, it may come as no surprise that often there has been a strong link between creativity and alcohol. The relationship between a writer and liquor is typically a love-hate relationship: beginning with love and following up with dependence, denial, anxiety and resentment. It was this complicated interaction of creativity and alcoholism that inspired author Olivia Laing to write “The Trip to Echo Spring: On Writers and Drinking” (Picador, $26)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1991
"Hemingway shot himself yesterday morning. There was a great man. . . . The most important thing he did for me was to legitimize manly courage, a quality that I had heard, until I came on his work, extolled by Scoutmasters and others who made it seem a fraud. He put down an immense vision of love and friendship, swallows and the sound of rain. There was never, in my time, anyone to compare with him."--John Cheever, in journals published in the New Yorker
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011
Short stories are often described in foodie terms, so what better way to cement the comparison than to pair the two at the Getty's "Delicious Shorts" series? Tim Curry, Christina Pickles and Denis O'Hare will read pieces by John Cheever, Tobias Wolff and T.C. Boyle, among others, with an array of gourmet goodies served alongside. Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, L.A. 3 and 7 p.m. Sat., 7 p.m. Sun. $30. http://www.getty.edu.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
To get in the Christmas spirit, you might want to read a good piece of literature,  something beyond “Twas the Night Before Christmas.”  In the spirit of giving, we've found three stories from three great writers of the 20th century that will put the holidays in a new light. The first is John Cheever's wonderfully funny 1949 story, “Christmas is a Sad Season for the Poor,” originally published in the New Yorker . Cheever's protagonist, Charlie, is an elevator operator for a Park Avenue apartment building.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Illinois Supreme Court ruled in favor of the widow of author John Cheever in her effort to control publication of a collection of his short stories. The ruling comes after a bitter three-year court battle. The state's highest court ruled that a contract between Mary Cheever and a Chicago publishing house seeking to publish the stories was not valid because it did not say how many stories or pages would be in the collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | Associated Press
Oprah Winfrey has blessed the book world's eternal underdog: the short story. Publishing's surest hitmaker announced Friday that her latest pick was Uwem Akpan's debut collection "Say You're One of Them," practically guaranteeing hundreds of thousands of sales, numbers generally unthinkable for short stories beyond works by Ernest Hemingway, John Cheever and other giants of the art form. Akpan, 38, is a native of Nigeria and an ordained Jesuit priest who in 2006 received a master's degree in creative writing from the University of Michigan.
BOOKS
February 17, 1991
As editor of "The Uncollected Stories of John Cheever," I appreciate the challenges faced by Elizabeth Mehren when she researched "A Cacaphony of Cheevers" (Dec. 2). Sorting out four years of litigation is no trifling task, and she crisply summarized the whole affair. I write only to clarify a few points that perhaps the demands of space precluded her from exploring. Yes, I sent a "working" list of stories to Ben Cheever in November, 1987. More important, in December of that year I discussed the entire project with Mrs. Cheever at her home: the subtitle "1930-1981" (certainly an indication of scope)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
To get in the Christmas spirit, you might want to read a good piece of literature,  something beyond “Twas the Night Before Christmas.”  In the spirit of giving, we've found three stories from three great writers of the 20th century that will put the holidays in a new light. The first is John Cheever's wonderfully funny 1949 story, “Christmas is a Sad Season for the Poor,” originally published in the New Yorker . Cheever's protagonist, Charlie, is an elevator operator for a Park Avenue apartment building.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
In his new biography, "Farther and Wilder: The Lost Weekends and Literary Dreams of Charles Jackson," Blake Bailey explores the tormented life of the author of "The Lost Weekend" - the once-celebrated 1944 novel that led to the Oscar-winning film - and his plunge into literary obscurity. The Portsmouth, Va.-based biographer has also written extensive books about John Cheever, winning a National Book Critics Circle Award, and of Richard Yates, for which Bailey was a finalist for the honor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011
Short stories are often described in foodie terms, so what better way to cement the comparison than to pair the two at the Getty's "Delicious Shorts" series? Tim Curry, Christina Pickles and Denis O'Hare will read pieces by John Cheever, Tobias Wolff and T.C. Boyle, among others, with an array of gourmet goodies served alongside. Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, L.A. 3 and 7 p.m. Sat., 7 p.m. Sun. $30. http://www.getty.edu.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009
The Battle for America 2008: The Story of an Extraordinary Election by Dan Balz and Haynes Johnson (Viking) A richly reported, closely observed account of the clash of ideals and gallery of historic candidates leading up to the election of a lifetime. The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America by Timothy Egan (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) The complex, tragic story of the biggest forest fire in American history, reconstructed at the grass-roots level.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009 | By Ed Park
1Comfortably over a thousand pages, "The Complete Stories of J.G. Ballard" "The Complete Stories of J.G. Ballard" (Norton: 1,216 pp., $35) isn't just a doorstop but the door itself, a portal to the worlds that Ballard (who died this year) hatched in his fictions. In the relentless consumer society of "The Subliminal Man," a giant ad is vandalized and revealed to be flashing the words "BUY NOW BUY NOW BUY NOW BUY NOW BUY NEW CAR NOW NEW CAR NOW NEW CAR NOW," followed by "YES" 10 times in a row. In the surreal "Vermilion Sands," artists make singing sculptures and poets plug commands into a Verse-Transcriber.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | Associated Press
Oprah Winfrey has blessed the book world's eternal underdog: the short story. Publishing's surest hitmaker announced Friday that her latest pick was Uwem Akpan's debut collection "Say You're One of Them," practically guaranteeing hundreds of thousands of sales, numbers generally unthinkable for short stories beyond works by Ernest Hemingway, John Cheever and other giants of the art form. Akpan, 38, is a native of Nigeria and an ordained Jesuit priest who in 2006 received a master's degree in creative writing from the University of Michigan.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Treetops" may well be Susan Cheever's masterpiece. All the praise in the world could not do justice to this book, nor can paraphrase encompass its majesty. At first glance, "Treetops" is simply a memoir of the author's mother--meant to balance her earlier, controversial book about her father, in which she yanked her deceased literary dad rather unceremoniously out of the closet, disclosing to the American reading public that John Cheever was bisexual.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
The Letters of John Cheever; edited by Benjamin Cheever (Simon & Schuster: $19.95; 381 pages) "My father died at about 4 p.m. in the master bedroom of his house in Ossining, New York. That was on June 18, 1982. Since then I've found a lot of moderately successful ways of bringing him back, of making him close and real. I wear his watch, re-read his books, speak with his friends. I read his letters." Benjamin Cheever has sought out and edited several hundred of John Cheever's letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Collected Stories and Other Writings John Cheever Library of America: 1,056 pp., $35 Complete Novels John Cheever Library of America: 960 pp., $35 Cheever A Life Blake Bailey Alfred A. Knopf: 774 pp.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2000
Patrick Goldstein makes many interesting and valid points about so-called "vanity productions" of certain movie stars ("Vanity, Thy Name Is Disaster," May 19), but why on Earth did he set the keynote by picking on Burt Lancaster and "The Swimmer"? Unlike most of the other misbegotten projects Goldstein cites, "The Swimmer" did not originate as the star's pet project. Unless I'm mistaken, at least one other major name, William Holden, had already turned down the lead in John Cheever's problematic allegory before Lancaster was cast by producer Sam Spiegel.
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