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John Clayton

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI
* The bassist is the co-leader of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, the resident group at the Hollywood Bowl. Getting Ready: I start by calling the KLON jazz hotline--(562) 985-7115--and get a listing of what's going on in town musically. I always hope there will be an afternoon jazz concert, especially during the summer.
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NEWS
May 27, 2004 | Lisa Rosen
Bassist, composer, arranger and co-leader, Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra. The orchestra will be playing the Ford Amphitheater on June 27, Aug. 22 and Sept. 19. I love to go fishing off the coast. A lot of people go fishing to meditate and connect with nature and all that. Well, I'm connecting with nature, but I'm on a mission to catch fish. It's really fun, what bait is working best, what areas are the best, reading the water, figuring out what kind of gear you need.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Does anyone remember natural sound? This is a rare and supposedly unpopular phenomenon that existed before the invention of microphones and amplifiers. There are those who are firmly convinced that it is extent; however, Friday and Saturday, when the John Clayton Trio appeared at the Loa in Santa Monica, natural sound came back in all its gentle, undistorted glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Los Angeles isn't lacking in multigenerational show business families -- mostly in the film world. Think Fondas, Douglases, etc. But jazz has its own examples, and two of them were on full display Saturday night in a Pasadena Jazz Institute program appropriately titled "Fathers and Sons." The concert, presented on the patio of the Pasadena Museum of California Art, featured the father and son duos of guitarists Dave and Larry Koonse and bassist John Clayton with his son, pianist Gerald Clayton.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
John Clayton remembers clearly when he was bitten by the writing bug. "I was playing with Count Basie in 1977, and I kept getting goose bumps when we played," said Clayton, the bassist, chief composer, arranger and co-leader of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra with his saxophone-playing brother Jeff, and drummer Jeff Hamilton. "In six weeks, I had the Basie band's book memorized, so I could really listen to what was going on. Then I got up the nerve to write a chart."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO
Money and looking good don't motivate John Clayton, nor, as he gets older, do pretentious shows of technique. Instead, the 39-year-old bassist is on a musical quest for something deeper, a personal and meaningful approach to jazz. "You don't think about the need to make a living," said Clayton, who fronts a group at the Horton Grand Hotel downtown this Friday and Saturday nights with his brother, 37-year-old saxophonist Jeff Clayton.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was an exquisite segment--about halfway through the Mancini Musicale at Royce Hall on Saturday night--that defined, more than any other, the great value of the Henry Mancini Institute. The piece was "The C Zone," written by bassist-bandleader-composer John Clayton for his son, pianist Gerald Clayton.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz made a powerful move into the spotlight of Los Angeles cultural life last month with the announcement that the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., under new Executive Vice President and Managing Director Willem Wijnbergen, has established an initiative that "extends the horizons of the association's activities to include jazz as a permanent part of its mission." The immediate consequence of the initiative will be the availability of more jazz at the Hollywood Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Clayton remembers clearly when he was bitten by the writing bug. "I was playing with Count Basie in 1977, and I kept getting goose bumps when we played," said Clayton, the bassist, chief composer, arranger and co-leader of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra with his saxophone-playing brother Jeff, and drummer Jeff Hamilton. The group plays tonight at the Pasadena Jazz Festival. "In six weeks, I had the Basie band's book memorized, so I could really listen to what was going on.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Los Angeles isn't lacking in multigenerational show business families -- mostly in the film world. Think Fondas, Douglases, etc. But jazz has its own examples, and two of them were on full display Saturday night in a Pasadena Jazz Institute program appropriately titled "Fathers and Sons." The concert, presented on the patio of the Pasadena Museum of California Art, featured the father and son duos of guitarists Dave and Larry Koonse and bassist John Clayton with his son, pianist Gerald Clayton.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was an exquisite segment--about halfway through the Mancini Musicale at Royce Hall on Saturday night--that defined, more than any other, the great value of the Henry Mancini Institute. The piece was "The C Zone," written by bassist-bandleader-composer John Clayton for his son, pianist Gerald Clayton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saxophonist Jeff Clayton's robust solos on behalf of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, the big band he leads with his brother John Clayton, always raise the question: What would the alto man sound like left to his own devices in a small group setting? An enthusiastic audience had the chance to find out Friday at Steamers Cafe in Fullerton, where Clayton fronted a quartet rounded out by pianist Donald Vega, bassist Christoph Luty and drummer Lorca Hart.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The dispute over the alleged resignation of Willem Wijnbergen from the post of L.A. Philharmonic managing director is bound to bring a moment of apprehension to fans who have anticipated his affection for jazz to have a beneficial effect upon the music's presence in the Southland. But, although the circumstances surrounding the Wijnbergen dispute are still somewhat unclear, the status of the Philharmonic's jazz initiative appears to remain solid.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Any doubts regarding the choice of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra as the resident jazz ensemble at the Hollywood Bowl were quickly overcome Thursday night at the International Assn. of Jazz Educators Conference at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim. Performing before a crowd that included most of the 6,000 to 7,000 attendees at the event, the orchestra gave a performance clearly illustrating that it has the potential to become one of the premier large jazz ensembles in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz made a powerful move into the spotlight of Los Angeles cultural life last month with the announcement that the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., under new Executive Vice President and Managing Director Willem Wijnbergen, has established an initiative that "extends the horizons of the association's activities to include jazz as a permanent part of its mission." The immediate consequence of the initiative will be the availability of more jazz at the Hollywood Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1997 | Don Heckman
A band with three bass players as the upfront soloists? Sounds like a guaranteed formula for low-frequency clutter. They might as well feature the tune "Mississippi Mud," since that's probably how it will sound. But all those apprehensions are brushed aside by the simple fact that this is a group of uncommonly gifted musicians--not simply players, not simply bass players, but musicians.
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