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John Coffee

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BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Auditor Scott London isn't the only one dealing with a dented reputation. His former employer, KPMG, is scrambling to do damage control after an insider-trading scandal swept through its Los Angeles office. It has put many of the Big Four accounting firm's clients on edge, wondering if there's more to come as the federal government continues its investigation. The Department of Justice said London leaked inside information on five public companies, including Herbalife Ltd. and Skechers USA Inc., to a golfing buddy who then executed trades.
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BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- A giant Wall Street hedge fund has agreed to plead guilty in a major insider-trading case. The federal government's agreement with SAC Capital Advisors, the Connecticut-based fund run by billionaire Steven A. Cohen, is set to be announced at a news conference Monday by Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney in Manhattan. Bharara's office announced an indictment of SAC Capital in July, a rare criminal prosecution of a financial firm. Under the agreement, SAC Capital will pay $1.8 billion in penalties, according to court documents.
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BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Should federal prosecutors favor California as backdrop for cases against Wall Street firms? Earlier this year, there was the Justice Department's lawsuit against Standard & Poor's, which prosecutors accused of fueling the financial crisis with dubious ratings of mortgage investments. That case was filed in federal court in Los Angeles. Now there is another civil fraud case against a Wall Street firm -- this one out of Sacramento. As The Times reports Friday , U.S. Atty.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Should federal prosecutors favor California as backdrop for cases against Wall Street firms? Earlier this year, there was the Justice Department's lawsuit against Standard & Poor's, which prosecutors accused of fueling the financial crisis with dubious ratings of mortgage investments. That case was filed in federal court in Los Angeles. Now there is another civil fraud case against a Wall Street firm -- this one out of Sacramento. As The Times reports Friday , U.S. Atty.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and E. Scott Reckard
NEW YORK - The widely expected $13-billion settlement between JPMorgan Chase & Co. and the federal government started to take shape with details in a key deal unveiled Friday. The New York bank agreed to pay $5.1 billion to the regulator overseeing mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, even as JPMorgan kept hashing out the broader pact with federal and state agencies. The Federal Housing Finance Agency had accused the bank and two others JPMorgan bought during the housing crisis of misleading Fannie and Freddie about mortgages and mortgage-backed securities it sold the companies from 2005 to 2007.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -  JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s stunning $2-billion loss serves as a “wonderful poster boy for the Volcker rule,” a leading securities law expert said. “Banks that are too big to fail can't be allowed to lose their shirt,” Columbia Law School professor John Coffee told The Times.  “The Volcker rule faces overwhelming opposition in the financial community, but this is sort of a poster boy for just what can go wrong,” Coffee said. The Volcker rule, named for former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, refers to a provision of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law that aims to curtail speculative trading by banks.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- A former senior KPMG auditor's leaks could threaten the reputation of one of the country's biggest accounting firms, industry experts said. Auditors like Scott London, a former senior partner in KPMG's office in Los Angeles, are privy to client companies' financial secrets -- valuable data which he told the Los Angeles Times he shared with an unnamed friend who then traded stocks using the illicit tips. The scandal is evidence that apparently none of corporate America's most trusted names is immune to the temptations of insider trading.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- A giant Wall Street hedge fund has agreed to plead guilty in a major insider-trading case. The federal government's agreement with SAC Capital Advisors, the Connecticut-based fund run by billionaire Steven A. Cohen, is set to be announced at a news conference Monday by Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney in Manhattan. Bharara's office announced an indictment of SAC Capital in July, a rare criminal prosecution of a financial firm. Under the agreement, SAC Capital will pay $1.8 billion in penalties, according to court documents.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to resolve a tortuous and costly legal battle, Dow Corning Corp. reached a tentative agreement with negotiators for women with silicone breast implants Wednesday to pay $3.2 billion to settle claims by more than 170,000 women that the implants harmed their health. The settlement would compensate women based on the seriousness of injury they claim, providing up to $300,000 for those who have a severely debilitating illness.
SPORTS
June 30, 1995 | John Ortega
Kadrina Coffee of Palmdale High has taken the term late-season charge to another level. While most of the region's top performers have hung up their spikes for the summer, the Falcon freshman has been on a tear since an asthma attack limited her to a seventh-place finish in the 400 meters in last month's Southern Section Division I championships. She helped Palmdale to a school-record time of 3 minutes 47.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and E. Scott Reckard
NEW YORK - The widely expected $13-billion settlement between JPMorgan Chase & Co. and the federal government started to take shape with details in a key deal unveiled Friday. The New York bank agreed to pay $5.1 billion to the regulator overseeing mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, even as JPMorgan kept hashing out the broader pact with federal and state agencies. The Federal Housing Finance Agency had accused the bank and two others JPMorgan bought during the housing crisis of misleading Fannie and Freddie about mortgages and mortgage-backed securities it sold the companies from 2005 to 2007.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Auditor Scott London isn't the only one dealing with a dented reputation. His former employer, KPMG, is scrambling to do damage control after an insider-trading scandal swept through its Los Angeles office. It has put many of the Big Four accounting firm's clients on edge, wondering if there's more to come as the federal government continues its investigation. The Department of Justice said London leaked inside information on five public companies, including Herbalife Ltd. and Skechers USA Inc., to a golfing buddy who then executed trades.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- A former senior KPMG auditor's leaks could threaten the reputation of one of the country's biggest accounting firms, industry experts said. Auditors like Scott London, a former senior partner in KPMG's office in Los Angeles, are privy to client companies' financial secrets -- valuable data which he told the Los Angeles Times he shared with an unnamed friend who then traded stocks using the illicit tips. The scandal is evidence that apparently none of corporate America's most trusted names is immune to the temptations of insider trading.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -  JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s stunning $2-billion loss serves as a “wonderful poster boy for the Volcker rule,” a leading securities law expert said. “Banks that are too big to fail can't be allowed to lose their shirt,” Columbia Law School professor John Coffee told The Times.  “The Volcker rule faces overwhelming opposition in the financial community, but this is sort of a poster boy for just what can go wrong,” Coffee said. The Volcker rule, named for former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, refers to a provision of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law that aims to curtail speculative trading by banks.
SPORTS
June 30, 1995 | John Ortega
Kadrina Coffee of Palmdale High has taken the term late-season charge to another level. While most of the region's top performers have hung up their spikes for the summer, the Falcon freshman has been on a tear since an asthma attack limited her to a seventh-place finish in the 400 meters in last month's Southern Section Division I championships. She helped Palmdale to a school-record time of 3 minutes 47.
SPORTS
December 16, 1988
Gary Stevens rode 5 winners at Hollywood Park Thursday, boosting his total for the meeting to 39. He is 15 ahead of runner-up Patrick Valenzuela. Stevens won with Basic Grey ($17.80) in the first race, Romaxe ($6) in the third, Featurepresentation ($8.40) in the fourth, Matt's Gene ($6.60) in the fifth and Ship's Log ($11.60) in the ninth. Survive took the lead near the sixteenth pole and drew off for a 1 3/4-length victory over Young Flyer, ridden by Laffit Pincay, in the feature race.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. regulators are probing whether Merrill Lynch & Co. adequately informed investors about losses from sub-prime mortgages before announcing a larger-than-expected $8.4-billion write-down last week, said a person with knowledge of the matter.
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