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John Coltrane

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NEWS
February 11, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL
For years, much of Coltrane's later output was snubbed by fans and critics alike, and that's a shame; some of his most intense and emotional work was produced late in his career. Indeed, the jazz world is still playing catch-up with his heroic experimentation of the mid-'60s. For this album, the quartet played "Brazilia," "Nature Boy" and "Song of Praise," but "Chim Chim Cheree" is the mind-boggler, all but unrecognizable as a tune from Disney's "Mary Poppins."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
That Phil Ramone was a musical force in the recording studio is undeniable, and the evidence lies in the range of his accomplishments. For example, within one three-year period in the early 1960s, Ramone mixed Lesley Gore's smash hit "It's My Party," recorded Marilyn Monroe seducing President John F. Kennedy in song on his birthday and engineered essential double-quartet recordings by jazz innovators Ornette Coleman and Eric Dolphy. Ramone, who died Saturday in his late 70s or early 80s, depending on sources, would have been only around 30 at the time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2000
Dennis Sandole, 87, jazz guitarist and teacher of such luminaries as John Coltrane. After teaching himself to play the guitar at age 19, Sandole played in a neighborhood band in Philadelphia. By the early 1940s, he was playing with major swing-era bands including those led by Charlie Barnet, Boyd Raeburn, Tommy Dorsey and Ray McKinley. He also recorded film soundtracks and played in recording sessions for Frank Sinatra and Billie Holiday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Some musicians are famous for 15 minutes. Others stay famous (and rich) for 50 years. Then there are those like Terry Callier, the Chicago soul and bluesman who died Saturday at 67 of cancer. Possessed with a sweetly disarming baritone voice that shone through songs like "Ordinary Joe" and "Dancing Girl," and a wealth of conceptual ambition, Callier and his hard-to-classify music never quite found their audience in the 1960s and '70s, at least not on the level attained by funky friends like Curtis Mayfield.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
John Coltrane's primary recording career was decidedly brief: It began in 1955 with albums he made with Miles Davis for Prestige Records and concluded with "Interstellar Space," an album on the Impulse! label recorded only a few months before he died in 1967. Fortunately, Coltrane recorded prolifically--more than 70 Coltrane CDs are currently available, though many of these are from live concerts and are no doubt duplicates. Happily, most of his oeuvre is simply first-rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2004 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Elvin Jones, the jazz drummer whose dynamic sound was a vital component to John Coltrane's seminal quartet in the 1960s, has died. He was 76. Jones died Tuesday of heart failure at a hospital in Englewood, N.J., according to his wife, Keiko. She said he had been in failing health for some time. From the 1960s on, Jones was a key force in the evolution of jazz drumming with a style that critics viewed as sometimes ferocious, often subtle and always original.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The image of John Coltrane will loom large over the Playboy Jazz Festival this weekend at the Hollywood Bowl. The impact of his airy sound and dense improvisational style has made him, arguably, the most influential musician of the last four decades. But it has taken the approaching 75th anniversary of his birth (Sept. 23) to trigger some long overdue acknowledgment of his vital importance to jazz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first Hindu temple in the San Fernando Valley has opened in a small, nondescript wooden building on a busy Chatsworth street. Although its humble beginning doesn't compare to the elegant complex of Hindu shrines near Malibu Canyon, the temple nevertheless has carved out a distinction in a uniquely Southern California way. The swami for the Chatsworth temple is Alice Coltrane, a black convert to Hinduism and widow of celebrated jazz saxophonist John Coltrane.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer.
Branford Marsalis tells of once sitting with bassist Buster Williams and listening to one of his tracks on the Shirley Horn album "It Had to Be You." Says Marsalis: "I had a solo where I sounded a little like Ben Webster, then I sounded like myself. Then I threw in a lick--I didn't know where it came from. 'Wow, that sounds just like John Coltrane.' Buster said, 'A lot of us would like to sound like him.'
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1997 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
The picture of John Coltrane made by photographer William Claxton in 1960 at New York's Guggenheim Museum shows the legendary jazz saxophonist intently pondering the meaning of an exhibition of modern art. What makes the photograph unique is not the surroundings; Coltrane was receptive to artistic expression that reached well beyond the jazz arena. What is surprising is the lack of a horn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012
JAZZ The son of a jazz royalty in Alice and John Coltrane, Ravi Coltrane may never fully escape his parents' shadow, but on his latest album "Spirit Fiction" he sounds utterly at peace with that reality. A knotty and expressive release that nods toward his mother and father's restless creativity while at the same time encapsulating a logical extension of it, the quietly addictive album may be Coltrane's best yet. Here he performs in a quartet anchored by fiery young drummer E.J. Strickland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Paul Motian, an influential and much-admired jazz drummer who first gained renown in the late 1950s as part of the Bill Evans Trio and later became a composer and the leader of his own groups, has died. He was 80. Motian died Tuesday at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City of complications from myelodysplastic syndrome, a bone marrow disorder, said Tina Pelikan, a spokeswoman for ECM Records. During his nearly six-decade career, Motian (pronounced like "motion") spent a substantial amount of time with two of the finest jazz pianists: Evans and Keith Jarrett.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rashied Ali, a free-jazz drummer who backed John Coltrane and accompanied him in a ground-breaking duet album in the final months of the jazz master's life, died Wednesday in New York City. He was 76. His wife, Patricia Ali, said he died at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital of a blood clot in his lung. Ali joined Coltrane's group in the mid-1960s during the saxophonist's period of avant-garde jazz experimentation. When Coltrane decided to use two drummers in a concert at the Village Gate in November 1965, he chose Ali to back up drummer Elvin Jones.
BOOKS
September 16, 2007 | RJ Smith, RJ Smith is author of "The Great Black Way: L.A. in the 1940s and the Lost African-American Renaissance." He is a senior editor at Los Angeles magazine.
Once, there was a review. Jazz musician Don Ellis, critiquing John Coltrane's latest release in a 1965 issue of Jazz magazine, wrote: "It is a basic fact of life (psychologically and physiologically) that any one thing repeated for too long a time without variation becomes boring." As Ben Ratliff notes in his profound little book, "Coltrane: The Story of a Sound," the next issue of Jazz ran a letter in response from free-jazz trumpeter Charles Moore.
NEWS
August 12, 2007 | Gene Seymour, Newsday
Even now, with its walls stripped bare, its chipped basement walls showing the effects of water damage, and its frayed carpeting, it was possible to see John Coltrane's Long Island house for what it had been -- and what it could become. Steve Fulgoni, who has led the charge to turn the Dix Hills home of the legendary saxophonist-composer into a historic showplace, can see it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2007 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Alice Coltrane, the jazz performer and composer who was inextricably linked with the adventurous musical improvisations of her late husband, legendary saxophonist John Coltrane, has died. She was 69. Coltrane died Friday at West Hills Hospital and Medical Center in West Hills, according to an announcement from the family's publicist. She had been in frail health for some time and died of respiratory failure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rashied Ali, a free-jazz drummer who backed John Coltrane and accompanied him in a ground-breaking duet album in the final months of the jazz master's life, died Wednesday in New York City. He was 76. His wife, Patricia Ali, said he died at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital of a blood clot in his lung. Ali joined Coltrane's group in the mid-1960s during the saxophonist's period of avant-garde jazz experimentation. When Coltrane decided to use two drummers in a concert at the Village Gate in November 1965, he chose Ali to back up drummer Elvin Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1987 | CHRISTINE VICARS
Alice McCleod met John Coltrane in 1962, and the next five years could not have been more full. Alice, a jazz pianist, was 26. Coltrane, a tenor and soprano saxophonist, was 10 years older and already a jazz great. The couple's friendship quickly turned to love. They married and had four children. Alice became the keyboard player in Coltrane's jazz quartet. Through him, she learned to play the harp. He also introduced her to Eastern philosophy, religion, music and meditation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2004 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Elvin Jones, the jazz drummer whose dynamic sound was a vital component to John Coltrane's seminal quartet in the 1960s, has died. He was 76. Jones died Tuesday of heart failure at a hospital in Englewood, N.J., according to his wife, Keiko. She said he had been in failing health for some time. From the 1960s on, Jones was a key force in the evolution of jazz drumming with a style that critics viewed as sometimes ferocious, often subtle and always original.
BOOKS
March 14, 2004 | Michael Stillman
Listen to the coal rolling, rolling through the cold steady rain, wheel on wheel, listen to the turning of the wheels this night black as coal dust, steel on steel, listen to these cars carry coal, listen to the coal train roll.
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