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John Coplans

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2003 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
John Coplans, an influential art critic, magazine editor and curator who successfully reinvented himself as a photographer at the age of 60, died in his sleep Thursday in New York City after a long illness. He was 83. Coplans co-founded Artforum Magazine in June 1962. Within five years it ranked among the most important journals of new art, pushing older rivals like Art News, Art in America and Art International to the side.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2003 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
John Coplans, an influential art critic, magazine editor and curator who successfully reinvented himself as a photographer at the age of 60, died in his sleep Thursday in New York City after a long illness. He was 83. Coplans co-founded Artforum Magazine in June 1962. Within five years it ranked among the most important journals of new art, pushing older rivals like Art News, Art in America and Art International to the side.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA- PHILP
NEW YORK--One of the art world's renowned figures lives in the Bowery district of lower Manhattan in a grafittied building flanked by restaurant supply shops that park their industrial-strength refrigerators on the sidewalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2002 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA- PHILP
NEW YORK--One of the art world's renowned figures lives in the Bowery district of lower Manhattan in a grafittied building flanked by restaurant supply shops that park their industrial-strength refrigerators on the sidewalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
John Coplans, the distinguished critic and former editor of Artforum magazine, was 60 when he took up photography in 1980. His large gelatin prints--the scale determined by his former work as an abstract painter--were initially of friends, then of portions of his own aging body. In Coplans' bluntly honest, penetrating vision, middle-age anatomy becomes a newly discovered terrain--drooping, creased, furred and yet also heroically sculptural.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1994 | CATHY CURTIS
"You see how the deception is made. That's very important to me, to see how the trick was done," Tony DeLap said of "The Great Escape," part of an exhibition of his work from the '60s and '70s at the Cal State Fullerton Main Art Gallery (through March 13). Settled into a battered couch in the airy studio he and a hired hand conjured out of a Corona del Mar garage 17 years ago, the 66-year-old artist said the piece was "my excuse to work with materials, instead of being purely conceptual.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1992 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
Some men feel bad about being men these days. Men's groups are forming to examine the masculine psyche. Some are looking at issues of emotions and emotional maturity. Others are thinking about bonding with each other. Still others are examining issues of power--whether or not they like having it. Which means men are thinking a lot about themselves. Not exactly something new.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1985 | RICK VANDERKYNFF
In 1965, Tony DeLap left the security of a comfortable teaching position at UC Davis--and a growing reputation as an artist in the San Francisco area--for the uncertainties of teaching at a brand new school in rural Orange County. The school was UC Irvine, where DeLap has now taught for 20 years, all the while widening his niche in the art world.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1988 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Edward Leffingwell strides into the room in a hurry. He's between meetings, following a bulging appointment book through the day, and he's feeling harried. Since he arrived from New York last July to become director of visual arts of the city's Cultural Affairs Department and head of the Municipal Art Gallery at Barnsdall Art Park, the 47-year-old bachelor hasn't stopped running from one meeting to another.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
Claude Monet did it with 20 views of Rouen Cathedral. Andy Warhol did it with an endless series of identical Brillo boxes. John Coplans did it by repeatedly Xeroxing his own bare hands. All these artists have been fascinated by the implications of creating separate, finished works that share a deliberately repetitive form or structure. In his elegant debut exhibition, "One of a Kind: Contemporary Serial Imagery" (to Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
John Coplans, the distinguished critic and former editor of Artforum magazine, was 60 when he took up photography in 1980. His large gelatin prints--the scale determined by his former work as an abstract painter--were initially of friends, then of portions of his own aging body. In Coplans' bluntly honest, penetrating vision, middle-age anatomy becomes a newly discovered terrain--drooping, creased, furred and yet also heroically sculptural.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
There may be no better outcome for a museum exhibition than being at once instructive and entertaining. One such is the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's 60-odd-work charmer "From Head to Toe: Concepts of the Body in Twentieth Century Art." You get the idea from the very first grouping. It contrasts a classic work of high theoretical seriousness, Picasso's 1908 Cubist "Head of a Woman," with Alexandra Exter's 1926 "Evening Dress"--a male puppet who looks pretty tipsy.
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