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John Corcoran

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
TV news fibs in so many ways. If it's not the playacting of ratings sweeps series, it's the false promise, made to hold viewers through a commercial, that titillating stories are "coming up next." If it's not on-camera reporters taking bows for the work of off-camera field producers, it's newscasts blending electronic press kits in with staff-gathered news. These are relatively small deceptions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1998
John Corcoran's article on interpreting news cliches into "real-speak" ("What Newscasters Say [and What They Mean]," Counterpunch, Feb. 16) prompts me to add a few that undoubtedly were used by his former TV station (but could be applied to any major market TV news operation): "Regrettably, John Corcoran is no longer with us." (The dumbing-down of our target audience sealed his doom.) "We know he'll be successful in his future endeavors." (We fear he's going to end up in the movie business.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Santa Monica's art scene has sunk further into recessionary gloom with the loss of another gallery. And not just any gallery. James Corcoran--who in 1986 started the city's art gallery boom by moving his prestigious showcase from West Hollywood to the beach--will terminate his exhibition program at the end of February.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Santa Monica's art scene has sunk further into recessionary gloom with the loss of another gallery. And not just any gallery. James Corcoran--who in 1986 started the city's art gallery boom by moving his prestigious showcase from West Hollywood to the beach--will terminate his exhibition program at the end of February.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1998
John Corcoran's article on interpreting news cliches into "real-speak" ("What Newscasters Say [and What They Mean]," Counterpunch, Feb. 16) prompts me to add a few that undoubtedly were used by his former TV station (but could be applied to any major market TV news operation): "Regrettably, John Corcoran is no longer with us." (The dumbing-down of our target audience sealed his doom.) "We know he'll be successful in his future endeavors." (We fear he's going to end up in the movie business.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
In college, John Corcoran used his excellent vocabulary to make a strong vocal impression in class, but often handed in other students' term papers and sought out copies of tests before his exams. During his subsequent 18-year career in teaching, much of it in Oceanside schools, he never wrote on the blackboard and had students do all the reading in class.
OPINION
January 20, 1991
Is it possible to withdraw the Nobel Peace Prize from Gorbachev? JOHN CORCORAN, Playa del Rey
MAGAZINE
August 9, 1987 | NINA EASTON, Nina Easton is West Coast correspondent for the American Banker.
THE PARK WAS CLOSED the day the moving equipment rumbled across the tawny Palos Verdes bluffs toward Marineland. The orders that had come down the day before were accompanied by strict warnings against leaking the news. The afternoon was growing warm and hazy as 33-year-old Gail Laule pulled on her wet suit and jumped into a 650,000-gallon tank containing two killer whales.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2009
The fact that Jin is still alive is indeed good news for "Lost" fans ["So What Became of Jin?" by Maria Elena Fernandez, Feb. 6]. He survived an exploding ship, exposure, dying of thirst, drowning, a storm at sea, starvation, island moving and time travel. But most incredible of all, he managed not to get eaten by the shark the show has been jumping all season long. John Corcoran Jr. Calabasas
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1990 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
TV news fibs in so many ways. If it's not the playacting of ratings sweeps series, it's the false promise, made to hold viewers through a commercial, that titillating stories are "coming up next." If it's not on-camera reporters taking bows for the work of off-camera field producers, it's newscasts blending electronic press kits in with staff-gathered news. These are relatively small deceptions.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
In college, John Corcoran used his excellent vocabulary to make a strong vocal impression in class, but often handed in other students' term papers and sought out copies of tests before his exams. During his subsequent 18-year career in teaching, much of it in Oceanside schools, he never wrote on the blackboard and had students do all the reading in class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1990
"A person who makes a contribution has a better chance to get access than someone who does not"--a quote from Sen. Cranston (in his deposition to the Senate Ethics Committee) as to why he intervened on behalf of Charles Keating with the bank regulators. This certainly says a lot about Cranston's view of the workings of democracy. JOHN CORCORAN Playa del Rey
NEWS
March 25, 1985
The Irish Republican Army said it killed a man who had provided information to police, and it offered what it called a 14-day amnesty to other informers. An IRA statement in Dublin said John Corcoran, 45, father of eight, was killed after revealing "under questioning" that for several years he had provided police with information, including that which led to the arrest of three men charged with a 1981 post office robbery.
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